Register for Webinar Wednesday - Introduction to Quaker Genealogy Research by Craig Scott, MA, CG, FUGA

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This lecture examines how Quakers created records at the various types of meetings, be they Yearly, Quarterly or Monthly. It examines the types of records, their value to a researcher and where they can be found.

Join us and Craig Scott, MA, CG, FUGA for the live webinar Wednesday, March 29, 2017 at 2pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion. 

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About the presenter

CraigScott-144x144Craig Roberts Scott, MA, CG, FUGA is the author of The ‘Lost Pensions’: Settled Accounts of the Act of 6 April 1838 (Revised) and Records of the Accounting Officers of the Department of the Treasury, Inventory 14 (Revised). His most recent work is Understanding Revolutionary War and Invalid Pension Ledgers, 1818 – 1872, and the Payment Vouchers They Represent. He has authored seventeen books and several articles in the National Genealogical Society Quarterly, Family Chronicle and other genealogical publications. He is the President and CEO of Heritage Books, Inc., a genealogical publishing firm with over 5,300 titles in print. A professional genealogical and historical researcher for more than thirty years, he specializes in the records of the National Archives. He is a member of the Company of Military Historians on the editorial board of the National Genealogical Society Quarterly, and is a Director of the Association of Professional Genealogists. A faculty member for several years of the Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research, Samford University and the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy, and recently the Genealogical Institute of Pittsburgh. He is the coordinator for the 3rd Annual Heritage Books Genealogical Conference and Cruise. He was awarded the Grahame T. Smallwood, Jr. Award in 2008 and UGA Silver Tray Award in 2009. He became a Fellow, Utah Genealogical Association in 2014.

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Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 at:

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We look forward to seeing you all there!


Your Migration Secret Weapon - the New York State Census

  CoveredWagon

Those of us with westward migrating ancestors know how difficult it can be to trace people from their destination to their point of origin and vice versa. Even harder is finding the short stops along the way.

Many genealogists have learned to use the United States Federal Census as a clue to migration. By looking at the birth location of children in a migrating family, we can often determine some of the stops a family made on their journey westward. The only challenge is that the Federal Census is only enumerated every 10 years. That's a big gap!

New York's Role in Migration

New York played a big role in the lives of migrating families. Families who originated in New England often passed through New York, often stopping there for a few years before moving on. New York residents as well joined the migration west heading to Ohio and beyond.

The Trouble with New York

The challenge for many researchers is that the trail goes cold in New York. Vital records for most towns in New York state didn't start until the 1870s or later. If you have New England ancestors traveling west this come as a cold shock when you're used to vital records going back to the 1600s. Researching in New York is frustrating to say the least.

Your New Secret Weapon

All is not lost! You were on the right track when you used the U.S. Federal Census. While we may not have the advantage of New York vital records we do have the New York State Census.

The New York State Census was taken for the years 1825, 1835, 1845, 1855, 1865, 1875, 1892, 1905, 1915 and 1925. Not all counties in New York have extant records for all years but for 1855-1905 the coverage is very good
with the exception of a few counties.

Each of the census years asks for different information, of varying value to genealogists. It's the 1855, 1865 and 1875 censuses that I want to bring your attention to. These three censuses asked for the county of birth. If
your ancestors are making stops within New York before moving on, this information is invaluable in tracing their steps.

In addition, the three censuses indicate if a person owned land and the 1855 census mentions the “years resident in the town or city”.

An Example in Action

One of my "challenging" families is David Allen, his wife Mariah and their five kids. Between a common surname, transcription errors and migration I was fit to be tied tracking down this family.

Then I found them in the 1855 New York State Census. The family was living in Volney, Fulton City, Oswego County, New York. David was listed as being born Jefferson County, New York according to the 1855 census. His wife Mariah (no maiden name yet discovered) was also born in Jefferson County about 1823. Their first child Henry was born about 1844 also in Jefferson County.

The 1855 New York State Census showing the David Allen family. Please note the image has been altered to show the headers directly above the family listing. Ancestry.com
The 1855 New York State Census showing the David Allen family. Please note the image has been altered to show the headers directly above the family listing. Ancestry.com

The next child, Elizabeth, only one year younger that Henry, was born in Lewis County. A second daughter, Eleanor, was also born in Lewis County about 1849. The last child, Charles, only 11 months old was born in Oswego County.

This tells me I can place the family in Jefferson County, New York at least up until 1844. They are in Lewis County from about 1845 to no later than 1854. They arrive in Oswego County in time for Charles’ birth around 1854.

But there’s another clue. Column 13 – “Years resident in this city or town” – shows that the Allens have been in Volney, Fulton City for 2 years thus changing their likely arrival date in Oswego County to 1853. Column 20 – “Owners of land” – indicates that the Allen family did not own any land.

This one census helped to clear up where the family started and where they stopped along the way in New York on the travel west. It gave me new locations to search for new records. By 1860 the family had moved on the Manlius, LaSalle County, Illinois.

If your family traveled west during the mid-nineteenth century be sure to check the 1855, 1865 and 1875 New York State censuses (available on Ancestry.com) to find the clues to solving their migration mysteries.

Unfortunately the Allen family remains a bit of a mystery for me. In the 1880 US Federal Census I find a David Allen, Maria Allen and son Charles Allen of appropriate ages in Faribault, Rice County, Minnesota. But I also find in a different 1880 census a John Slocumb, Elizabeth Slocumb and a widowed Maria Allen living in Port Huron, St. Clair County, Michigan. A Michigan marriage record indicates that a Libbie Maria Allen born in Lewis County, New York married John Slocumb in 1877. It will take a bit more digging to determine which is my Allen family!

For help researching your New York ancestors see our New York series by expert Jane Wilcox in the Legacy library!

 

Marian Pierre-Louis is the Social Media Marketing Manager for Legacy Family Tree. She is also a speaker, writer and the host of The Genealogy Professional podcast. Check out her webinars in the Legacy library.

 

 


Picture This: Images You Can Freely Use - free webinar by Judy Russell now online for limited time

2017-03-22-image500blog

The recording of today's webinar, "Picture This: Images You Can Freely Use" by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL is now available to view at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com/BCG for free for a limited time.

Webinar Description

There *are* images out there for use in your genealogical writing and speaking, free, and free from copyright. Learn to find and use them safely.

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 27 minute recording of "Picture This: Images You Can Freely Use" is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership

883Carmack's Guide to Copyright and Contracts: A Primer for Genealogists, Writers and Researchers - 9.95

Genealogy is one of the most popular hobbies on the Internet. Genealogists love to share information about their families, and the very nature of the Internet fosters this practice. Probably because there is so much free information on the Web, many individuals have formed the false conclusion that "if it is on the Internet, anyone has a right to use the information as he/she sees fit." Despite the best of intentions, therefore, people will occasionally post content on a website or transmit it by e-mail without proper permission to do so.

The issue of copyright is an aspect of genealogical research that may never have crossed your mind. As copyright lawyer Karen Kreider Gaunt puts it, "Numerous misconceptions surround even basic issues, such as work for hire, fair use, public domain, and publication. An author or genealogist operating under one of these misconceptions could find herself faced with serious misunderstandings, loss of business and clients, harm to reputation and goodwill, and, at worst, litigation in federal court."

Ms. Gaunt's observations raise such fundamental questions as, "What is and what is not protected by copyright? What is in the public domain? Can I use information I find on the Internet? What constitutes fair use? When do I need to ask permission to use someone else's information, even if I quote it? And so on.

Fortunately, you can find the answers to these and similar questions in this book aimed primarily at genealogists and written in layman's terms. With Carmack's Guide to Copyright and Contracts in hand, you will be able to determine:

  • What are your rights to your own genealogical discoveries?
  • What can/should you do if someone has infringed on your copyright?
  • When do you need to ask someone's permission to reprint their work?
  • What are works in the public domain and how to find them?
  • Can someone tape your lecture without your permission?

In scarcely 100 pages, Carmack's Guide to Copyright and Contracts informs its readers about all aspects of copyright law. Each chapter in the book lays out a specific principle of copyright or contracts and then addresses the topic with situations specifically applicable to genealogists. Subjects covered in this fashion include: (1) Copyright Basics, (2) Fair Use, the Public Domain, and Seeking Permissions, (3) Illustrations, Images, Photographs, and Maps, (4) Works for Hire, (5) Collaboration Agreements, (6) Journals/Magazine Contracts, (7) Book contracts, (8) Electronic Contracts, and (9) Self-Publication Contracts. The author also provides an extremely useful glossary of terms found in contracts and matters of copyright. Rounding out the volume are an up-to-date bibliography; a resource directory of websites, links, and online articles; and an index to the book's contents.

119 pages | Published 2005, reprinted 2007 | PDF Edition

Buybutton-144

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 488 classes, 677 hours of genealogy education)
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Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • Introduction to Quaker Genealogy Research by Craig Scott, MA, CG, FUGA. March 29.
  • Exploring AncestryDNA's New Genetic Communities by Blaine Bettinger, Ph.D., J.D. March 30
  • Preserve, Share, and Search Your Digital Pictures with Google Photos by Geoff Rasmussen. April 5.
  • Your Whiteboard in the Cloud: Trello for Genealogists by Lisa Alzo. April 12.
  • Complete Photo Restoration in 4 Easy Steps by Eric Basir. April 14.
  • The Genealogy in Government Documents by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA. April 18.
  • Neighborhood Reconstruction: Effective Use of Land Records by Mary Hill, AG. April 19.
  • Finding and Using Land Ownership Maps by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA. April 26.
  • Researching Criminal Records by Ron Arons. April 28.
  • Take Me Back to Where I Belong: Transportation Records of the Freedmen’s Bureau by Angela Walton-Raji. May 3.
  • Beginning Danish Research by Charles Fritz Juengling, AG. May 10.
  • New York City and State Governmental Vital Records by Jane Wilcox. May 12.
  • MAXY DNA: Correlating mt-at-X-Y DNA with the GPS by Debbie Parker Wayne, CG, CGL. May 16.
  • Remember Me: Lifestreaming and the Modern Genealogist by Thomas MacEntee. May 17.
  • WikiTree: Free for All without a Free-for-All by Eowyn Langholf. May 24.
  • The Great War: Researching Your World War I Ancestors by Michael L. Strauss, AG. May 31.
  • Researching Your Minnesota Ancestors by Paula Stuart-Warren, CG, FMGS, FUGA. June 7.
  • How Harry Potter Can Teach You About DNA by Blaine Bettinger. June 14.
  • What Now? Your Next Steps with Autosomal DNA Testing by Diahan Southard. June 16.
  • Beating the Bushes: Using the GPS to Find Jacob Bush's Father by Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL. June 20.
  • Virtual Family Reunions: Super Easy, Super Fun by Pat Richley and Russ Worthington. June 21.
  • Canada's Top 10 by Kathryn Lake Hogan. June 28.
  • Censational Census Strategies by Mary Kircher Roddy. July 5.
  • Google Books: the tool you should use every day! by Lisa Louise Cooke. July 12.
  • Tips for Snapping Pics: How to Take Perfect Family Photographs by Jared Hodges. July 14.
  • Analyzing Documents Sparks Ideas for Further Research by Angela Packer McGhie, CG. July 18.
  • The Firelands, The Connecticut Western Reserve, and the Ohio Territory by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen, AG. July 19.
  • Family History Adhesive: The Science of Why History Binds Families and the Simple Tech of How to Do It by Janet Hovorka. July 26.
  • Tracing Your West Country Ancestors by Kirsty Gray. August 2.
  • A Taxing Matter: Using Tax Lists in Genealogy by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL. August 9.
  • Using Pictures with Legacy Family Tree by Geoff Rasmussen. August 11.
  • Analyzing Probate Records of Slaveholders to Identify Enslaved Ancestors by LaBrenda Garrett-Nelson, JD, LLM, CG. August 15.
  • Finding Your Ancestors in German Directories by Ursula C. Krause. August 16.
  • How to do Mexican Research and Be Successful by Jonathan Walker. August 23.
  • Getting Started with Evidentia by Edward A. Thompson. August 30.
  • Top Tech Tips for the Technologist and the Genealogist by Geoff Rasmussen. September 6.
  • Finding Isaac Rogers by Nicka Smith. September 13.
  • The ABCs and 123s of Researching Your Ancestor's School Records by Melissa Barker. September 15.
  • When Does Newfound Evidence Overturn a Proved Conclusion? by Tom Jones, Ph.D, CG, CGL. September 19.
  • WolframAlpha for Genealogists by Thomas MacEntee. September 20.
  • Quick Guide to Texas Research by Deena Coutant. September 27.
  • No Easy Button: Using “Immersion Genealogy” to Understand Your Ancestors by Lisa Alzo. October 4.
  • Southern States Migration Patterns by Mary Hill, AG. October 11.
  • Is Your Society Growing? Social Media may be your saving grace by Pat Richley. October 13.
  • Databases, Search Engines, and the Genealogical Proof Standard by David Ouimette, CG. October 17.
  • The WPA: Sources for Your Genealogy by Gena Philibert-Ortega. October 18.
  • Midwestern & Plains States Level Census Records by Paula Stuart-Warren, CG, FMGS, FUGA. October 25.
  • Is this the End? Taking Your German Brick Walls Down Piece by Piece by Luana Darby and Ursula C. Krause. November 1.
  • New York City Genealogical Research: Navigating Through The Five Boroughs by Michael L. Strauss, AG. November 8.
  • Using Non-Population Schedules for Context and Evidence by Jill Morelli. November 10.
  • British and Irish research: the differences by Brian Donovan. November 15.
  • Research in Federal Records: Some Assembly Required by Malissa Ruffner, JD, CG. November 21.
  • Understanding Alabama by Rorey Cathcart. November 29.
  • Finding Your Roots in Catholic Records by Lisa Toth Salinas. December 6.
  • I Thought He Was My Ancestor: Avoiding the Six Biggest Genealogy Mistakes by James M. Baker, PhD, CG. December 13.
  • Finding Your Nordic Parish of Birth by Jill Morelli. December 15.
  • The Law and the Reasonably Exhaustive (Re)Search by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL. December 19.
  • Palmetto Pride - South Carolina for Genealogist by Rorey Cathcart. December 20.
  • Problems and Pitfalls of a Reasonably Shallow Search by Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL. December 27.

Print the 2017 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


Are You My Grandpa? Men of the Same Name - BCG webinar by Rebecca Whitman Koford, CG now online for limited time

2017-03-21-image500blog

The recording of today's Board for Certification of Genealogists webinar, "Are You My Grandpa? Men of the Same Name" by Rebecca Whitman Koford, CG is now available to view at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com/BCG for free for a limited time.

Webinar Description

This lecture reviews tactics for sorting our ancestors from other men or women of the same name in the same general time period and location. Several case studies show how these methods were effective.

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 27 minute recording of "Are You My Grandpa? Men of the Same Name" is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 487 classes, 675 hours of genealogy education)
  • On-demand access to the instructor handouts (now 2,238 pages)
  • On-demand access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Chance for a members-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
  • Ability to view which webinars you are registered for
  • Use of the playlist, resume watching, and jump-to features

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year
  • Monthly membership: $9.95/month

Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • Picture This: Images You Can Freely Use by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL. March 22.
  • Introduction to Quaker Genealogy Research by Craig Scott, MA, CG, FUGA. March 29.
  • Preserve, Share, and Search Your Digital Pictures with Google Photos by Geoff Rasmussen. April 5.
  • Your Whiteboard in the Cloud: Trello for Genealogists by Lisa Alzo. April 12.
  • Complete Photo Restoration in 4 Easy Steps by Eric Basir. April 14.
  • The Genealogy in Government Documents by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA. April 18.
  • Neighborhood Reconstruction: Effective Use of Land Records by Mary Hill, AG. April 19.
  • Finding and Using Land Ownership Maps by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA. April 26.
  • Researching Criminal Records by Ron Arons. April 28.
  • Take Me Back to Where I Belong: Transportation Records of the Freedmen’s Bureau by Angela Walton-Raji. May 3.
  • Beginning Danish Research by Charles Fritz Juengling, AG. May 10.
  • New York City and State Governmental Vital Records by Jane Wilcox. May 12.
  • MAXY DNA: Correlating mt-at-X-Y DNA with the GPS by Debbie Parker Wayne, CG, CGL. May 16.
  • Remember Me: Lifestreaming and the Modern Genealogist by Thomas MacEntee. May 17.
  • WikiTree: Free for All without a Free-for-All by Eowyn Langholf. May 24.
  • The Great War: Researching Your World War I Ancestors by Michael L. Strauss, AG. May 31.
  • Researching Your Minnesota Ancestors by Paula Stuart-Warren, CG, FMGS, FUGA. June 7.
  • How Harry Potter Can Teach You About DNA by Blaine Bettinger. June 14.
  • What Now? Your Next Steps with Autosomal DNA Testing by Diahan Southard. June 16.
  • Beating the Bushes: Using the GPS to Find Jacob Bush's Father by Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL. June 20.
  • Virtual Family Reunions: Super Easy, Super Fun by Pat Richley and Russ Worthington. June 21.
  • Canada's Top 10 by Kathryn Lake Hogan. June 28.
  • Censational Census Strategies by Mary Kircher Roddy. July 5.
  • Google Books: the tool you should use every day! by Lisa Louise Cooke. July 12.
  • Tips for Snapping Pics: How to Take Perfect Family Photographs by Jared Hodges. July 14.
  • Analyzing Documents Sparks Ideas for Further Research by Angela Packer McGhie, CG. July 18.
  • The Firelands, The Connecticut Western Reserve, and the Ohio Territory by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen, AG. July 19.
  • Family History Adhesive: The Science of Why History Binds Families and the Simple Tech of How to Do It by Janet Hovorka. July 26.
  • Tracing Your West Country Ancestors by Kirsty Gray. August 2.
  • A Taxing Matter: Using Tax Lists in Genealogy by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL. August 9.
  • Using Pictures with Legacy Family Tree by Geoff Rasmussen. August 11.
  • Analyzing Probate Records of Slaveholders to Identify Enslaved Ancestors by LaBrenda Garrett-Nelson, JD, LLM, CG. August 15.
  • Finding Your Ancestors in German Directories by Ursula C. Krause. August 16.
  • How to do Mexican Research and Be Successful by Jonathan Walker. August 23.
  • Getting Started with Evidentia by Edward A. Thompson. August 30.
  • Top Tech Tips for the Technologist and the Genealogist by Geoff Rasmussen. September 6.
  • Finding Isaac Rogers by Nicka Smith. September 13.
  • The ABCs and 123s of Researching Your Ancestor's School Records by Melissa Barker. September 15.
  • When Does Newfound Evidence Overturn a Proved Conclusion? by Tom Jones, Ph.D, CG, CGL. September 19.
  • WolframAlpha for Genealogists by Thomas MacEntee. September 20.
  • Quick Guide to Texas Research by Deena Coutant. September 27.
  • No Easy Button: Using “Immersion Genealogy” to Understand Your Ancestors by Lisa Alzo. October 4.
  • Southern States Migration Patterns by Mary Hill, AG. October 11.
  • Is Your Society Growing? Social Media may be your saving grace by Pat Richley. October 13.
  • Databases, Search Engines, and the Genealogical Proof Standard by David Ouimette, CG. October 17.
  • The WPA: Sources for Your Genealogy by Gena Philibert-Ortega. October 18.
  • Midwestern & Plains States Level Census Records by Paula Stuart-Warren, CG, FMGS, FUGA. October 25.
  • Is this the End? Taking Your German Brick Walls Down Piece by Piece by Luana Darby and Ursula C. Krause. November 1.
  • New York City Genealogical Research: Navigating Through The Five Boroughs by Michael L. Strauss, AG. November 8.
  • Using Non-Population Schedules for Context and Evidence by Jill Morelli. November 10.
  • British and Irish research: the differences by Brian Donovan. November 15.
  • Research in Federal Records: Some Assembly Required by Malissa Ruffner, JD, CG. November 21.
  • Understanding Alabama by Rorey Cathcart. November 29.
  • Finding Your Roots in Catholic Records by Lisa Toth Salinas. December 6.
  • I Thought He Was My Ancestor: Avoiding the Six Biggest Genealogy Mistakes by James M. Baker, PhD, CG. December 13.
  • Finding Your Nordic Parish of Birth by Jill Morelli. December 15.
  • The Law and the Reasonably Exhaustive (Re)Search by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL. December 19.
  • Palmetto Pride - South Carolina for Genealogist by Rorey Cathcart. December 20.
  • Problems and Pitfalls of a Reasonably Shallow Search by Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL. December 27.

Print the 2017 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


Register for Webinar Wednesday - Picture This: Images You Can Freely Use by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL

Register

There *are* images out there for use in your genealogical writing and speaking, free, and free from copyright. Learn to find and use them safely.

Join us and Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL for the live webinar Wednesday, March 22, 2017 at 2pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion. 

Download the syllabus

In preparation for the webinar, download the supplemental syllabus materials here.

Registerbut 

Or register for multiple webinars at once by clicking here.

Not sure if you already registered?

Login to view your registration status for this webinar (available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers).

Test Your Webinar Connection

To ensure that your webinar connection is ready to go, click here.

Can't make it to the live event?

No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

JudyRussell-144x144A genealogist with a law degree, Judy G. Russell is a lecturer, educator and writer who enjoys helping others understand a wide variety of genealogical issues, including the interplay between genealogy and the law. She has a bachelor's degree in political science and journalism from George Washington University in Washington, D.C. and a law degree from Rutgers School of Law-Newark, and holds Certified Genealogist and Certified Genealogical Lecturer credentials from the Board for Certification of Genealogists where she serves as a member of the Board of Trustees. She has worked as a newspaper reporter, trade association writer, legal investigator, defense attorney, federal prosecutor, law editor and, until recently Judy was an adjunct member of the faculty at Rutgers Law School. Judy is a Colorado native with roots deep in the American south on her mother's side and entirely in Germany on her father's side. Visit her website at www.legalgenealogist.com.

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  • 1pm Central
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  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone.

We look forward to seeing you all there!


Geoff's MyHeritage experiment post #2 - Smart Matching, and a surprise at the end

In week two of my investigation into MyHeritage.com I will look into their Smart Matching technology. My initial post explained that just like I have experimented with other genealogy technologies, I felt it was time to give MyHeritage a solid look. Last week I described my experience of importing my Legacy-generated GEDCOM file into a new online tree. It went smoothly and I ended up with a private online tree.

Well, mostly private. This "mostly private" part concerned me enough that I sent an email to the company to get clarification. They responded nearly immediately. What I learned from their response not only satisfied my concern, but gave me great confidence in and respect for their Smart Matching.

What is Smart Matching?

Less than two days after importing my tree, I received the following email which 1) defines a Smart Match and 2) presented me with 45 Smart Matches:

Sm1

I recognized one of the Smart Matches as being on my father-in-law's side. And since we're now living with him as we await the completion of the construction of our new house, maybe researching one of his ancestors will earn me some points.

This Smart Match shows that the Fanny Maria Stewart in my tree could be the same person as a Fanny Maria Stewart in a potential relative's tree. If I determine that they are identical, it looks like I may be able to add a photograph and quite a bit of personal information that I did not previously have.

Sm2

I clicked on the Learn More button and was presented with this screen (click to enlarge):

Sm3

Because I did not start with much information about Fanny, I was not able to determine if they were the same or not. In the absence of an "I'm not sure" button, I instead opened Legacy to take a closer look:

Sm4

Sure enough, they are the same person. And even better, I chose someone who ended up in my state of Idaho! I had no idea my father-in-law had family here. I wonder if he knows....

Using Legacy's Relationship Calculator (Tools > Calculator > Relationship), I learned that Fanny is the wife of my father-in-law's great-granduncle. I love Legacy! Maybe MyHeritage has a similar relationship calculator. Good for them if they do!

Sm5

After my closer look, I can with confidence click on the orange Yes button.

Sm6

This took me to a Review Match screen where it compares what I have in my tree with what the other submitter has in their tree.

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Scrolling to the bottom, it compares our trees in graphical format. Clearly, there is a lot that I could add to my tree from theirs. Yet, any good genealogist knows to use content from others' trees as clues and not as evidence or conclusions. Regardless, it looks like they've done a lot of work and I love the many photographs they have.

Sm23

Before clicking on the Confirm Match button, I noticed an arrow to its right. Clicking on it popped up a message that I could save this submitter's data to my tree - "only New and Improved information will be saved." Like I just mentioned, I probably would not want to do that without verifying the data. Instead, I will just click on the Confirm Match button.

Sm9

Not knowing for sure what or if anything would automatically be added to my tree, I was relieved when I saw the next screen. Although I probably will not use its functionality, it has arrows pointing from the right side to the left side indicating that I could copy bits and pieces of information if I desired. It's actually quite similar to the FamilySearch tools in our Legacy Family Tree software.

SM10

At the very bottom it showed two photographs that I could add to my tree, and since I love photos of my ancestors, to see how it works, I clicked on the copy button. Pretty easy.

Scrolling to the end, two buttons await my next click - "Extract all info" or "Save to tree." Clicking "Save to tree" I would expect that the only thing that would be copied to my tree would be the one photo. Let's do it.

Sm11

The "Review Match" screen appeared along with a confirmation of when I confirmed the match.

Sm12

Just below her picture, I am going to click on the "View in Tree" link.

Sm13

Just like that, her picture now appears in my private online tree.

Conclusions

  • MyHeritage did a good job of correctly presenting me with a possible match to Fanny.
  • If I ever wanted to, it appears to be very simple to copy information from another tree to mine.
  • Yet is the ease of copying going to contribute to the duplication of inaccurate trees? 
  • I am still going to treat data like this as clues and follow up with solid genealogical research.
  • I will always be a believer that someone else may hold a missing piece of my family's puzzle and so I continue to believe that it's okay to look at others' trees.
  • In each step, there was a link to contact the submitter of the information. If I am looking to get in touch with a submitter, it seems to be pretty simple.

More Smart Matches?

The email I received showed 45 possible Smart Matches. Clicking on the "Matches by People" option of the Discoveries menu shows that MyHeritage has been busy since they sent me the email. 

Sm14

Check this out:

Sm15

I don't know whether to be excited or overwhelmed by those numbers. Keep in mind, I uploaded my entire tree - my side, my wife's side, ancestors that I'm not currently researching, ancestors that I think about every day. Wondering if I could narrow the matches down, I clicked on the "Sort by" menu and then clicked on Relation.

Sm16

This is where things started getting, in my kids' words, "sketchy." 

Sm22

Among the first Smart Matches, when sorted by Relation, was my grandmother! It showed that there were three matches. How could there be Smart Matches to my grandmother, who is alive, when I thought my tree, and the living people in it, were private? This shows that Grandma is a Smart Match to someone in the "Fjeldsted Web Site," the "Reed Web Site," and the "McCall Web Site." 

Sm18

Clicking on the orange Review Match buttons definitely shows that Grandma does appear in these other websites as a living person. Her personal details and the personal details of her children are there as well. This is where I became concerned with the privacy.

I sent an email to MyHeritage asking them to help me understand this experience as it relates to their privacy policy. My email to them was sent at 10:34am. Their response to me was sent at 11:39am. Impressive. I halfway expected to learn about some little-known "gotcha" fine print in their privacy policy. While they did point me to their privacy policy, the feeling I had after reading through it was that of amazement. What they are doing really is incredible - in a good way! Here's the copied/pasted policy from https://www.myheritage.com/FP/Company/popup.php?p=privacy_policy

What are Smart Matches™ and how do they affect your privacy?

Smart Matches™ is a technology developed and owned by MyHeritage to find matches between family trees, by looking for individuals that they have in common, and bridging across differences in spelling, phonetics, facts and languages. Smart Matches™ are very useful in that they facilitate discoveries of unknown relatives and reuniting families whose ties have been disconnected over time.

Other MyHeritage users may receive notifications regarding Smart Matches™ between individuals in their family tree and individuals in your family tree. Smart Matches™ may also be found on living individuals in your tree. If you are concerned about the privacy of your family tree, to the extent that you do not wish to allow potential relatives to find and view parts of it, you can disable Smart Matches™ for your family tree(s). See "Privacy Preferences" below. By default, Smart Matches™ are enabled.

With permission from MyHeritage, I also am including their follow-up comments to me:

It is very rare that we have people concerned by this, and their remedy is to turn off the Smart Matching. When others cannot match with your tree, you too do not get matches with other trees, so 99.99% of the people prefer to keep it enabled. The ability to match living relatives is very helpful, because many discoveries and family reunions happen that way. btw, if the other user didn't have your children in his tree already, he won't see their details in a Smart Match, to protect their privacy. If he does have them in the tree, he is very likely related to you, and he knows about them already, and in that case hiding information such as their age defeats the purpose of having matches.

So these three other trees in which my grandmother was listed as a Smart Match already had the living details about my grandmother and her children. So like MyHeritage wrote, they are likely close relatives, and someone I would probably actually want to communicate with. And if they did not already have the private information about Grandma, I never would have matched to their tree anyways. Without this explanation, or the careful attention to the explanation of how their Smart Matching works, some may be concerned, like I was. In my opinion, this is actually very good technology, and like they said, if it bothers you, you can easily disable Smart Matches.

Smart Matches in the Tree

I also learned that while browsing the tree in the chart mode, you can tell if a person has Smart Matches if they have a little green icon. Just give it a click and their list of matches appear.

Sm19

Surprise at the end - Smart Matches in Legacy 9.0

For the first "official" time ever, I'm announcing here that the soon-to-be-released Legacy 9.0 will have built-in hinting. Instead of going out to sites like FamilySearch, GenealogyBank, or even MyHeritage, Legacy will do the searching for you! 

Sm20

Above, Jeremiah Brown's new Hint icon shows the number of 9+. Clicking on it shows 39 hints from MyHeritage, 23 hints from GenealogyBank, and 1 hint from FindMyPast. Clicking on each one will present the results. While I could go visit each site each month on my own, Legacy is using some pretty advanced logic to find results that you may miss on your own.

Sm21

Coming soon to Legacy 9.0!

What's Next

This post was a little longer than I intended it to be, but I think I now have a good grasp of the ins and outs of MyHeritage's Smart Matches tool and like what I see. Coming up next, I will report on the second of the seven unique technologies from the MyHeritage webinar - Record Matches. Stay tuned.


6 New Classes Added to Irish Series

12-class Irish Series by John Grenham

The most comprehensive beginning Irish genealogy course available online just got better. Originally a 6-class series,  the course has now been extended to twelve classes. It is taught by the foremost Irish genealogy authority, John Grenham. He is the author of the definitive Irish genealogy guide Tracing Your Irish Ancestors. The now twelve-class series introduces you to Irish genealogy and then progressively takes you through the major Irish records sources. Taught with humor and an authentic Irish accent, Grenham brings together Irish research in a way only the most knowledgeable Irish researcher can.

John Grenham

Foundations of Irish Genealogy by John GrenhamJohn Grenham came to Irish professional genealogy in 1981, as one of the panel of Irish Genealogical Office researchers and later worked for Hibernian Research. As in-house researcher for the Genealogical Office in 1990-91, he was instrumental in setting up the GO Consultation Service, the forerunner of the current Advisory Services in the National Library of Ireland and National Archives of Ireland.

He was Project Manager with the Irish Genealogical Project from 1991 to 1995 and later went on to develop and market his own genealogical software, 'Grenham’s Irish Recordfinder'.  He ran the Irish Times/Irish Ancestors website from 1998 to 2016. It now runs on his own site. In 2005, he was the first Genealogist-in-Residence at Dublin City Library and Archive. He is responsible for developing most of the heritage databases on databases.dublincity.ie.

He was awarded a fellowship of The Irish Genealogical Research Society in 2007 and of the Genealogical Society of Ireland in 2010. Among his publications are the standard guide to Irish genealogy, Tracing your Irish Ancestors (4th ed.2012), Clans and Families of Ireland (1995),Generations (1996), “The Genealogical Office and its Records” in The Genealogical Office (1999), Grenham’s Irish Surnames (CD-ROM, 2003),The Atlantic Coast of Ireland (2014) and numerous articles and columns in the UK magazine Your Family Tree. He wrote the “Irish Roots” column and blog in The Irish Times between 2009 and 2016. The blog is now at www.johngrenham.com/blog. In 2011 and 2014, he was co-presenter of the Irish television show “The Genealogy Roadshow“. In 2014, 2015 and 2016, he delivered a ten-week diploma in family history course at City Colleges in Dublin.

The new additional 6-classes in the Foundations of Irish Genealogy series

These join the original 6-classes in the series:

We're working hard to give our webinar subscribers the educational classes they need to maximize their genealogical research!

All twelve of these classes are bonus classes in the webinar library. The webinar previews are always free for non-members to watch.

New to webinars and online education? Learn more about the online genealogy education classes at Legacy Family Tree Webinars.

The individual classes

Foundations of Irish Genealogy 7 of 12: Census Substitutes

Because of the destruction of almost all 19th-century censuses in 1922, census substitutes have taken on an unnatural importance for Irish research. This talk gives an overview of the range of records involved, moving along the spectrum from things that are somewhat census-like to strange beasts that are nothing at all like a census, but still highly useful.

Foundations of Irish Genealogy 7: Census Substitutes

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Foundations of Irish Genealogy 8 of 12: Newspapers

The usefulness of Irish newspapers as a research tool has been completely transformed by digitization. The talk outlines the main geographic areas covered by newspapers since the 18th century and provides a guide to online access, as well as some very useful offline sources. 

Foundations of Irish Genealogy 8: Newspapers

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Foundations of Irish Genealogy 9 of 12: Wills and Directories

Both of these sources concern those with at least some property to their name, and both are now much easier to search online. The talk details relevance, locations and access, online and offline. 

Foundations of Irish Genealogy 9: Wills and Directories

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Foundations of Irish Genealogy 10 of 12: Registry of Deeds

Since 1704, the Registry of Deeds in Dublin has been providing legal registration of property transactions, often recording precious extended-family information in the process. The LDS Family History Library has a full set of the records up to 1929 on 2686 microfilms, but they are woefully misunderstood and underused. The talk covers the nature of the transactions, the individuals involved and the main routes of access, with examples and images of the records. This talk also covers the Genealogical Office. 

Foundations of Irish Genealogy 10: Registry of Deeds

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Foundations of Irish Genealogy 11 of 12: The Valuation Office

Griffith's Valuation is the best-known 19th-century Irish census substitute. But the published Valuation itself is only the tip of the iceberg. Before publication, a huge surveying operation produced mountains of documents, most now available online, and after publication revisions were produced continually up to the 1980s, providing an excellent source of information on possible living relatives. The talk details the creation of the records, their locations and access, online and offline. 

Foundations of Irish Genealogy 11: The Valuation Office

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Foundations of Irish Genealogy 12 of 12: Occupational Records

 An overview of the most important occupational sources for Irish genealogy, with a large part devoted to the records of Irishmen in the British Army.

Foundations of Irish Genealogy 12: Occupational Records by John Grenham

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Register for Tuesday's BCG Webinar - Are You My Grandpa? Men of the Same Name by Rebecca Whitman Koford, CG

Register

This lecture reviews tactics for sorting our ancestors from other men or women of the same name in the same general time period and location. Several case studies show how these methods were effective.

This webinar is hosted and sponsored by the Board for Certification of Genealogists.

Join the Board for Certification of Genealogy and Rebecca Whitman Koford, CG for the live webinar Tuesday, March 21, 2017 at 8pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion. 

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About the presenter

Rebecca-Koford-144x144Rebecca Whitman Koford holds a Certified Genealogist® credential. Her focus is in American research with special emphasis in Maryland and has been taking clients and lecturing since 2004. She has spoken for the National Genealogical Society Conference, Maryland State Archives, and for groups in Maryland, Virginia, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Washington, D.C., and Delaware. She is a board member of the Maryland Genealogical Society and volunteers at the Family History Center in Frederick, Maryland. She has published articles in the NGS Magazine and the Maryland Genealogical Society Journal. She is a graduate of the ProGen Study Group, an online peer-led study program based on the book Professional Genealogy by Elizabeth Shown Mills; she was appointed ProGen Administrator in January 2015. Rebecca is currently very enthusiastic about the Society of Preservation Patriots project sponsored by FGS, an effort to digitize original military records from the National Archives. Rebecca lives in Mt. Airy, Maryland, with three active teenagers and a very patient husband.

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Michele Simmons Lewis receives Certified Genealogist credential from BCG!

MicheleCongratulations to our very own Michele Simmons Lewis, CG who was notified today that she received the Certified Genealogist credential from the Board for Certification of Genealogists. Michele is one of our senior technical support staff members and is the face of our Legacy User Group on Facebook. Becoming certified is a really big deal and we are so proud of her!

We continue to support genealogy standards by hosting the webinar series for the Board for Certification of Genealogists, held the third Tuesday evening of each month. Visit www.familytreewebinars.com/BCG to register for their upcoming webinars and to view the classes in their library. And who knows, maybe we'll see Michele's picture appear on this page soon.


Why are Irish records so weird? Free webinar by Ireland's John Grenham now available for limited time

2017-03-15-image500blog

The recording of today's webinar, "Why are Irish records so weird?" by John Grenham is now available to view at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com for free for a limited time.

Webinar Description

Not all Irish records were destroyed in 1922, but the burning of the Public Record Office in that year did leave an immense gap. As a result, Irish genealogical research has to deal with idiosyncratic, fragmentary and sometimes marginally relevant records in ways that can seem very strange to those used to British, US or Australian sources. In addition, Ireland came late to digitization and has done it unsystematically. To be polite. This talk unravels the ways in which marginal records have become essential for Irish research, and the peculiarities in using them online.

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 28 minute recording of "Why are Irish records so weird?" is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership

9780806371528Tracing Your Irish Ancestors by John Grenham - PDF or Printed book

The best book ever written on Irish genealogy, the 4th edition of Tracing Your Irish Ancestors retains the familiar structure of previous editions but is now more useful than ever. Combining the key features of a textbook and a reference book, it describes the various steps in the research process while at the same time providing an indispensable body of source materials for immediate use.
 
The biggest change from previous editions is in its approach to the Internet. Online research is now an essential part of any Irish family history project, so the 4th edition serves as a directory to online records, discussing their uses and outlining research strategies. The sheer scale of the data available online makes a guide such as this all the more essential, and in the hands of a master it is indispensable.
 
Along with its step-by-step instructions in the location and use of traditional genealogical records, its discussion of civil records of birth, marriage, and death, as well as land records and wills, and its list of Roman Catholic parish records and source lists-—all expanded, updated, and indexed-—it is easily the most useful book in Irish genealogy.

608 pages | Published 2012 | Printed Edition
 
"The most comprehensive and authoritative book on Irish genealogy available."-—Heritage Quest
 
"Highly recommended for anyone doing Irish research."--Federation of Genealogical Societies Forum
 
"It is one of the most up-to-date and thorough source books for serious researchers of Irish family history."--American Reference Books Annual
 
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Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • Are You My Grandpa? Men of the Same Name by Rebecca Whitman Koford, CG. March 21.
  • Picture This: Images You Can Freely Use by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL. March 22.
  • Introduction to Quaker Genealogy Research by Craig Scott, MA, CG, FUGA. March 29.
  • Preserve, Share, and Search Your Digital Pictures with Google Photos by Geoff Rasmussen. April 5.
  • Your Whiteboard in the Cloud: Trello for Genealogists by Lisa Alzo. April 12.
  • Complete Photo Restoration in 4 Easy Steps by Eric Basir. April 14.
  • The Genealogy in Government Documents by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA. April 18.
  • Neighborhood Reconstruction: Effective Use of Land Records by Mary Hill, AG. April 19.
  • Finding and Using Land Ownership Maps by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA. April 26.
  • Researching Criminal Records by Ron Arons. April 28.
  • Take Me Back to Where I Belong: Transportation Records of the Freedmen’s Bureau by Angela Walton-Raji. May 3.
  • Beginning Danish Research by Charles Fritz Juengling, AG. May 10.
  • New York City and State Governmental Vital Records by Jane Wilcox. May 12.
  • MAXY DNA: Correlating mt-at-X-Y DNA with the GPS by Debbie Parker Wayne, CG, CGL. May 16.
  • Remember Me: Lifestreaming and the Modern Genealogist by Thomas MacEntee. May 17.
  • WikiTree: Free for All without a Free-for-All by Eowyn Langholf. May 24.
  • The Great War: Researching Your World War I Ancestors by Michael L. Strauss, AG. May 31.
  • Researching Your Minnesota Ancestors by Paula Stuart-Warren, CG, FMGS, FUGA. June 7.
  • How Harry Potter Can Teach You About DNA by Blaine Bettinger. June 14.
  • What Now? Your Next Steps with Autosomal DNA Testing by Diahan Southard. June 16.
  • Beating the Bushes: Using the GPS to Find Jacob Bush's Father by Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL. June 20.
  • Virtual Family Reunions: Super Easy, Super Fun by Pat Richley and Russ Worthington. June 21.
  • Canada's Top 10 by Kathryn Lake Hogan. June 28.
  • Censational Census Strategies by Mary Kircher Roddy. July 5.
  • Google Books: the tool you should use every day! by Lisa Louise Cooke. July 12.
  • Tips for Snapping Pics: How to Take Perfect Family Photographs by Jared Hodges. July 14.
  • Analyzing Documents Sparks Ideas for Further Research by Angela Packer McGhie, CG. July 18.
  • The Firelands, The Connecticut Western Reserve, and the Ohio Territory by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen, AG. July 19.
  • Family History Adhesive: The Science of Why History Binds Families and the Simple Tech of How to Do It by Janet Hovorka. July 26.
  • Tracing Your West Country Ancestors by Kirsty Gray. August 2.
  • A Taxing Matter: Using Tax Lists in Genealogy by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL. August 9.
  • Using Pictures with Legacy Family Tree by Geoff Rasmussen. August 11.
  • Analyzing Probate Records of Slaveholders to Identify Enslaved Ancestors by LaBrenda Garrett-Nelson, JD, LLM, CG. August 15.
  • Finding Your Ancestors in German Directories by Ursula C. Krause. August 16.
  • How to do Mexican Research and Be Successful by Jonathan Walker. August 23.
  • Getting Started with Evidentia by Edward A. Thompson. August 30.
  • Top Tech Tips for the Technologist and the Genealogist by Geoff Rasmussen. September 6.
  • Finding Isaac Rogers by Nicka Smith. September 13.
  • The ABCs and 123s of Researching Your Ancestor's School Records by Melissa Barker. September 15.
  • When Does Newfound Evidence Overturn a Proved Conclusion? by Tom Jones, Ph.D, CG, CGL. September 19.
  • WolframAlpha for Genealogists by Thomas MacEntee. September 20.
  • Quick Guide to Texas Research by Deena Coutant. September 27.
  • No Easy Button: Using “Immersion Genealogy” to Understand Your Ancestors by Lisa Alzo. October 4.
  • Southern States Migration Patterns by Mary Hill, AG. October 11.
  • Is Your Society Growing? Social Media may be your saving grace by Pat Richley. October 13.
  • Databases, Search Engines, and the Genealogical Proof Standard by David Ouimette, CG. October 17.
  • The WPA: Sources for Your Genealogy by Gena Philibert-Ortega. October 18.
  • Midwestern & Plains States Level Census Records by Paula Stuart-Warren, CG, FMGS, FUGA. October 25.
  • Is this the End? Taking Your German Brick Walls Down Piece by Piece by Luana Darby and Ursula C. Krause. November 1.
  • New York City Genealogical Research: Navigating Through The Five Boroughs by Michael L. Strauss, AG. November 8.
  • Using Non-Population Schedules for Context and Evidence by Jill Morelli. November 10.
  • British and Irish research: the differences by Brian Donovan. November 15.
  • Research in Federal Records: Some Assembly Required by Malissa Ruffner, JD, CG. November 21.
  • Understanding Alabama by Rorey Cathcart. November 29.
  • Finding Your Roots in Catholic Records by Lisa Toth Salinas. December 6.
  • I Thought He Was My Ancestor: Avoiding the Six Biggest Genealogy Mistakes by James M. Baker, PhD, CG. December 13.
  • Finding Your Nordic Parish of Birth by Jill Morelli. December 15.
  • The Law and the Reasonably Exhaustive (Re)Search by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL. December 19.
  • Palmetto Pride - South Carolina for Genealogist by Rorey Cathcart. December 20.
  • Problems and Pitfalls of a Reasonably Shallow Search by Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL. December 27.

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New Book - American Settlements and Migrations by Lloyd de Witt Bockstruck

8125Brand new in 2017 and now available in the Legacy Family Tree online store!

This book provides a synopsis of the original patterns of settlement and migration for the United States. Mr. Bockstruck discusses each of the 50 states, however, his emphasis is on the states and territories that were established between the colonial period and the middle of the nineteenth century. For each state the author examines pioneers’ places of origin, reasons for settlement, specific places of settlement in America, names of pioneering families, migrations within and between states, and more. Equally important, throughout the volume he names the key sources for further research.

The study of migration is inextricably intertwined with family history. By combining a knowledge of history and geography, therefore, the family historian can extend the family pedigree across the country. Every detail represents a potential clue to an elusive ancestor, from the name of a shipping line, port of embarkation, and clusters of fellow passengers, to the nature of soil available to the colonist, church membership, and status of roadways.
 
Some members of the family may not have ventured away from the ancestral home. Others went westward but did not continue as far as some of their kinfolk. They may have generated the records further inland that would enable the family historian to bridge an ancestral geographical gap. Finding earlier places of residence could enable one to determine the place of nativity of an ancestor. Following such paths could enable one to locate relatives who remained in the East or dropped off earlier along the migration route, thereby identifying the immigrant or colonist who founded the family in the New World and perhaps the ancestral home in the Old World as well.
 
The study of migration/immigration follows several principles. Firstly, one must understand the local history of one’s ancestral homes. For example, as late as 1950, the state possessing greatest percentage of residents of British descent was Utah. Why? Utah was settled by Mormons, and this relatively new religious group was mostly composed of New England Puritan stock. Moreover, that church’s first missionary efforts abroad were in conducted in the British Isles, and those converts joined them in Utah.
 
Secondly, migrations are also tied to similar climatic belts. Colonists and immigrants often sought out lands that were capable of growing the crops with which they were familiar, as in the case of Scandinavian settlement in Minnesota and the Dakotas.
 
Thirdly, migration rests upon forces that draw immigrants to a new home. It may also apply to those forces that drove them away from their home. In some instances both aspects may apply. For instance, more than 150,000 natives of Virginia were living in the states of the Old Northwest Territory in 1850—an area accessible to them and possessing terrain and sols with which they were familiar.
 
Still other factors impinging on migration and settlement include available modes of transportation, religious preference or ethnicity, economic factors such as famines and floods, and foreign wars, revolutions, and other aspects of statecraft. Bockstruck contrasts colonial migrations, for example, with those following American Independence. During the colonial period, individuals and groups moved from the southern colonies to the northern colonies, and vice versa. Until the 1750s, colonists utilized sailing ships as the primary mode of transportation between colonies. They did not move from the East to the West until after the French and Indian War, when the Braddock and Forbes roads were built to enable the military forces to go into the interior to challenge the French in the Ohio River Valley. Such roads were necessary to move heavy military equipment, such as canons, and materiel to the war front.
 
American Settlements and Migrations is arranged by region and thereunder by state. Each chapter outlines not only the events, persons, and forces that contributed to a state’s settlement but also offers untold clues to the reader’s own ancestors. Might an 18th-century South Carolina forebear have been part of the British expulsion of the French from Nova Scotia? Was your Welsh ancestor part of the Pennsylvania migration to work in the Knoxville, Tennessee mining industry? Your Irish Famine-era ancestor was living in Boston in 1860, but is the gap in his genealogy attributable to the fact that he might have entered North America through the Canadian Port of St. John, Newfoundland. These are just some of hundreds of possibilities Mr. Bockstruck gets you to consider. His new primer may be just the clue finder you have been looking for.

108 pages | Paperback | Published 2017
 
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Geoff's MyHeritage experiment post #1 - starting my tree

There is an online genealogy service that for years I dismissed. I already have my data in Legacy Family Tree software AND manage a research-in-progress tree at both FamilySearch and Ancestry - do I really need my data in yet another tree? This is what I thought before viewing Mike Mansfield's excellent webinar, "7 Unique Technologies for Genealogy Discoveries at MyHeritage." Afterwards my opinion completely changed. I was impressed both with Mike as a speaker and with their technology. About a year later I published the "Top 20 Webinars of All Time" list, and was shocked to see that this class came in at number three - of all time! And now that MyHeritage has entered the DNA community, I've decided that they deserve more of my genealogical time and a solid look. 

This post is the first of a series where I will investigate and report on my use and impressions of each of the "seven unique technologies" that Mike introduced.

  1. Smart Matching
  2. Record Matches
  3. Newspaper & Free-Text Matching
  4. Record Detective
  5. Instant Discoveries
  6. SearchConnect
  7. Global Name Translation

Combined with the other two MyHeritage-related webinars...

...I have become very impressed with their technology. As with any other genealogy technology, when I learn a little of its potential, I try to make time for a thorough investigation. Previous investigations have resulted in my support and love for tech like AniMap, Google Photos, Flip-Pal, and GoToWebinar. Now it's MyHeritage's turn. Either I'll like it or I won't, and I look forward to giving you my honest opinions of what I learn.

In this first post, I will describe my thought and decision making process as I determine how I will use the site. Initial questions I have include:

  • Should I just use their search form to see if I get any matches in their trees or records, or like Mike suggested, should I first upload my tree to take advantage of their automated searching?
  • If I do upload my tree, should I upload my entire tree or just the branches I am currently researching?
  • How does MyHeritage protect my privacy?
  • What about DNA? Will they let me import the raw results of the DNA tests I've completed elsewhere? If so, is their pool of testers large enough to be of any value to me?

How Should I Start?

In a previous MyHeritage-related webinar I uploaded a GEDCOM that I created from Legacy to demonstrate how the process worked. It was simple. But because I am beginning my serious investigation into their site, want to begin fresh, and to be able to demonstrate for you the steps involved, I've gone ahead and removed anything I previously shared.

Next is the decision of "how should I start my tree?" The Family Tree tab at MyHeritage shows that I can manually start a new tree or import a GEDCOM. 

1

Since my time is valuable and because I already have my data in Legacy, I've decided to create and import a GEDCOM into their system. Should I import all 23,702 individuals, or should I import just the ancestors I am actively researching? A few minutes go by...I've decided to import my entire family file for this reason - DNA. Although I do not yet know anything about their DNA services, with my experience at other DNA sites, I've learned that the more I share the more genetic matches I find.

Good, another decision made. This is way easier than all the decisions I'm making about the new house we are building.

Privacy

Since the file I will upload will contain information about my living family, I'd better check out MyHeritage's privacy policy. Hopefully they give me complete control over what is public and private. Reading their privacy policy here has given me the confidence that I can share my personal information without fear of it becoming public. I've pasted a portion of their policy below.

The user decides to what degree information on the family tree and other information from the family site will be visible to and discoverable by other users, by setting the Privacy Preferences (described in a detailed section below). The user decides whether to build the family tree on the Website on his/her own, or to make it a collaborative effort by inviting family members to assist, using facilities available on the Website for inviting members. If other members are invited, they make similar choices on entering information into the family tree. All information is entered into the Website directly and is not collected implicitly. The Website prevents information on living people from being disclosed to strangers, to protect privacy, and such information if entered will not be visible outside the family site or discoverable by search engines such as Google. It is often useful however to allow deceased people entered into the family tree to be visible to and searchable by other people, to allow one's distant relatives to discover it.

The personal information that you and other users enter is stored in the Website only for the purpose of delivering the Service to you and the other users, i.e. displaying the family tree, printing the family tree, searching historical records, and other genealogy features.

Creating the GEDCOM file

The first step is to create the GEDCOM file. This is done in Legacy Family Tree. Follow the steps below.

1. Go to File >  Export > GEDCOM file

2

To change WHO you will include in the file, click on the Record Selection button. To change any privacy settings for whom you will export, click on the Privacy Options button. I'm going to leave things as they are because of my reasoning above.

2. Click the "START EXPORT" button in the upper right, select the location (the desktop is a good spot) and enter the name of the file.

3

1 minutes 28 seconds later:

4

Importing the GEDCOM into MyHeritage

1. On the Family Tree tab at www.myHeritage.com, click on the Browse button, locate and select the GEDCOM you just created, and click the orange Import GEDCOM button.

20 seconds later the upload was complete (1:28pm):

5

Thinking this would take a while, I got up to go eat some lunch. Then Pavlov's Theory proved true once again - I got the email notification sound on my phone which meant I immediately checked my inbox. It was just one minute later that I received the following:

6

Wow, that was quick.

Clicking the link took me to my tree where the first thing I noticed was the balloons - it's my son's 15th birthday in 12 days. Thanks for the reminder! 

7

Tree Settings

I next went to the Tree Settings page to make sure that the privacy settings are what I expected them to be.

8

Since I'm not certain what a "site member" is yet, I'm going to turn off the ability for site members to "download the family tree file" and for now I'm going to change the permissions so I am the only person who can edit the family tree.

Privacy Settings

The privacy settings are on its own page.

9

The first option of "include family tree in MyHeritage historical search engines" concerned me as I do not want any living individuals in my tree to be searchable. Hovering over the little information icon, it explained that only deceased individuals will be searchable and viewable to others.

So far so good.

Conclusion

At this point, I am comfortable with my tree and its privacy settings. It was easy to upload and the resulting tree looks appealing and easy to navigate. If I never do any more with MyHeritage, at the very least, I now have another backup of my entire tree just in case. I took a quick peek at the Discoveries page to see if it had found any Smart Matches or Record Matches yet. It hadn't, but I didn't expect it to be that quick. I'll check back in a few days to see what it has found for me.

What's Next

Coming up next, I will report on the first of the seven unique technologies from the webinar - Smart Matches. Stay tuned.


Register for Webinar Wednesday - Why are Irish records so weird? by John Grenham

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Not all Irish records were destroyed in 1922, but the burning of the Public Record Office in that year did leave an immense gap. As a result, Irish genealogical research has to deal with idiosyncratic, fragmentary and sometimes marginally relevant records in ways that can seem very strange to those used to British, US or Australian sources. In addition, Ireland came late to digitization and has done it unsystematically. To be polite. This talk unravels the ways in which marginal records have become essential for Irish research, and the peculiarities in using them online.

Join us and John Grenham for the live webinar Wednesday, March 17, 2017 at 2pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion. 

Download the syllabus

In preparation for the webinar, download the supplemental syllabus materials here.

Registerbut 

Or register for multiple webinars at once by clicking here.

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Login to view your registration status for this webinar (available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers).

Test Your Webinar Connection

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Can't make it to the live event?

No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

JohnGrenham-144x144John Grenham came to Irish professional genealogy in 1981, as one of the panel of Irish Genealogical Office researchers and later worked for Hibernian Research. As in-house researcher for the Genealogical Office in 1990-91, he was instrumental in setting up the GO Consultation Service, the forerunner of the current Advisory Services in the National Library of Ireland and National Archives of Ireland.

He was Project Manager with the Irish Genealogical Project from 1991 to 1995 and later went on to develop and market his own genealogical software, 'Grenham's Irish Recordfinder'.  He ran the Irish Times/Irish Ancestors website from 1998 to 2016. It now runs on his own site. In 2005, he was the first Genealogist-in-Residence at Dublin City Library and Archive. He is responsible for developing most of the heritage databases on databases.dublincity.ie.

He was awarded a fellowship of The Irish Genealogical Research Society in 2007 and of the Genealogical Society of Ireland in 2010. Among his publications are the standard guide to Irish genealogy, Tracing your Irish Ancestors (4th ed.2012), Clans and Families of Ireland (1995), Generations (1996), "The Genealogical Office and its Records" in The Genealogical Office (1999), Grenham's Irish Surnames (CD-ROM, 2003), The Atlantic Coast of Ireland (2014) and numerous articles and columns in the UK magazine Your Family Tree. He wrote the "Irish Roots" column and blog in The Irish Times between 2009 and 2016. The blog is now at www.johngrenham.com/blog. In 2011 and 2014, he was co-presenter of the Irish television show "The Genealogy Roadshow". In 2014, 2015 and 2016, he delivered a ten-week diploma in family history course at City Colleges in Dublin.

His website is www.johngrenham.com.

Add it to your Google Calendar

With our Google Calendar button, you will never forget our upcoming webinars. Simply click the button to add it to your calendar. You can then optionally embed the webinar events (and even turn them on and off) into your own personal calendar. If you have already added the calendar, you do not have to do it again - the new webinar events will automatically appear.

Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Wednesday, March 15, 2017 at:

  • 2pm Eastern (U.S.)
  • 1pm Central
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  • 11am Pacific

Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email both 1 day and 1 hour prior to the live webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone.

We look forward to seeing you all there!


Dutch Genealogy - new Legacy QuickGuide by John Boeren now available

Legacy QuickGuidesTM have quickly become one of the more popular resources for genealogists. Each guide contains four (sometimes five, sometimes more) pages of valuable information covering a variety of genealogy research topics, dozens of clickable links, and are written by genealogists and family historians who are experts in the subject areas. We've added another new Legacy QuickGuide: Dutch Genealogy by John Boeren. Now choose from 85 Legacy QuickGuides!

Dutch GenealogyDutch Genealogy - 2.95  

The Dutch Genealogy Legacy QuickGuide™ contains valuable research strategy to help you find your Dutch ancestors. This handy 8-page PDF guide can be used on your computer or mobile device for anytime access.
 
Many have ancestors of Dutch origin; some of them arrived as early settlers in the 17th century, others as immigrants in the 19th and 20th century. Dutch research requires knowledge of the Dutch language, which makes it a challenge for researchers from other countries. The good thing is that Dutch archives are full with documents that survived wars and other calamities. Many archives and collections go back in time more than 400 years. And if you are lucky, you will find traces of your ancestors back to the 13th or 14th century. An ever-growing digital collection of genealogical records makes online research quite easy. 
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Now choose from 85!

Purchase for just $2.95

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Home on the Range: Kansas Research Tips - free webinar by Cari Taplin, CG now available for limited time

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The recording of today's webinar, "Home on the Range: Kansas Research Tips" by Cari Taplin, CG is now available to view at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com for free for a limited time.

Webinar Description

This class will cover the main research strategies for finding your Kansas ancestors, including important historical events that influenced settlers, immigration and migration trends, and major record groups and repositories.

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 32 minute recording of "Home on the Range: Kansas Research Tips" is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership

Kansas GenealogyLegacy QuickGuide: Kansas Genealogy 2.95

Looking to find those elusive ancestors in the Sunflower State? The Kansas Genealogy Legacy QuickGuide™ contains useful information including a timeline of Kansas history events, tips on Kansas research strategy, outline of major immigrant groups, and more. Also included are links to websites and resources covering vital records, church records, census records, as well as general Kansas resources. This handy 6-page PDF guide can be used on your computer or mobile device for anytime access.

Click here to purchase for 2.95.

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 479 classes, 665 hours of genealogy education)
  • On-demand access to the instructor handouts (now 2,203 pages)
  • On-demand access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
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  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
  • Ability to view which webinars you are registered for
  • Use of the playlist, resume watching, and jump-to features

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year
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Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • Why are Irish records so weird? by John Grenham. March 15.
  • Are You My Grandpa? Men of the Same Name by Rebecca Whitman Koford, CG. March 21.
  • Picture This: Images You Can Freely Use by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL. March 22.
  • Introduction to Quaker Genealogy Research by Craig Scott, MA, CG, FUGA. March 29.
  • Preserve, Share, and Search Your Digital Pictures with Google Photos by Geoff Rasmussen. April 5.
  • Your Whiteboard in the Cloud: Trello for Genealogists by Lisa Alzo. April 12.
  • Complete Photo Restoration in 4 Easy Steps by Eric Basir. April 14.
  • The Genealogy in Government Documents by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA. April 18.
  • Neighborhood Reconstruction: Effective Use of Land Records by Mary Hill, AG. April 19.
  • Finding and Using Land Ownership Maps by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA. April 26.
  • Researching Criminal Records by Ron Arons. April 28.
  • Take Me Back to Where I Belong: Transportation Records of the Freedmen’s Bureau by Angela Walton-Raji. May 3.
  • Beginning Danish Research by Charles Fritz Juengling, AG. May 10.
  • New York City and State Governmental Vital Records by Jane Wilcox. May 12.
  • MAXY DNA: Correlating mt-at-X-Y DNA with the GPS by Debbie Parker Wayne, CG, CGL. May 16.
  • Remember Me: Lifestreaming and the Modern Genealogist by Thomas MacEntee. May 17.
  • WikiTree: Free for All without a Free-for-All by Eowyn Langholf. May 24.
  • The Great War: Researching Your World War I Ancestors by Michael L. Strauss, AG. May 31.
  • Researching Your Minnesota Ancestors by Paula Stuart-Warren, CG, FMGS, FUGA. June 7.
  • How Harry Potter Can Teach You About DNA by Blaine Bettinger. June 14.
  • What Now? Your Next Steps with Autosomal DNA Testing by Diahan Southard. June 16.
  • Beating the Bushes: Using the GPS to Find Jacob Bush's Father by Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL. June 20.
  • Virtual Family Reunions: Super Easy, Super Fun by Pat Richley and Russ Worthington. June 21.
  • Canada's Top 10 by Kathryn Lake Hogan. June 28.
  • Censational Census Strategies by Mary Kircher Roddy. July 5.
  • Google Books: the tool you should use every day! by Lisa Louise Cooke. July 12.
  • Tips for Snapping Pics: How to Take Perfect Family Photographs by Jared Hodges. July 14.
  • Analyzing Documents Sparks Ideas for Further Research by Angela Packer McGhie, CG. July 18.
  • The Firelands, The Connecticut Western Reserve, and the Ohio Territory by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen, AG. July 19.
  • Family History Adhesive: The Science of Why History Binds Families and the Simple Tech of How to Do It by Janet Hovorka. July 26.
  • Tracing Your West Country Ancestors by Kirsty Gray. August 2.
  • A Taxing Matter: Using Tax Lists in Genealogy by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL. August 9.
  • Using Pictures with Legacy Family Tree by Geoff Rasmussen. August 11.
  • Analyzing Probate Records of Slaveholders to Identify Enslaved Ancestors by LaBrenda Garrett-Nelson, JD, LLM, CG. August 15.
  • Finding Your Ancestors in German Directories by Ursula C. Krause. August 16.
  • How to do Mexican Research and Be Successful by Jonathan Walker. August 23.
  • Getting Started with Evidentia by Edward A. Thompson. August 30.
  • Top Tech Tips for the Technologist and the Genealogist by Geoff Rasmussen. September 6.
  • Finding Isaac Rogers by Nicka Smith. September 13.
  • The ABCs and 123s of Researching Your Ancestor's School Records by Melissa Barker. September 15.
  • When Does Newfound Evidence Overturn a Proved Conclusion? by Tom Jones, Ph.D, CG, CGL. September 19.
  • WolframAlpha for Genealogists by Thomas MacEntee. September 20.
  • Quick Guide to Texas Research by Deena Coutant. September 27.
  • No Easy Button: Using “Immersion Genealogy” to Understand Your Ancestors by Lisa Alzo. October 4.
  • Southern States Migration Patterns by Mary Hill, AG. October 11.
  • Is Your Society Growing? Social Media may be your saving grace by Pat Richley. October 13.
  • Databases, Search Engines, and the Genealogical Proof Standard by David Ouimette, CG. October 17.
  • The WPA: Sources for Your Genealogy by Gena Philibert-Ortega. October 18.
  • Midwestern & Plains States Level Census Records by Paula Stuart-Warren, CG, FMGS, FUGA. October 25.
  • Is this the End? Taking Your German Brick Walls Down Piece by Piece by Luana Darby and Ursula C. Krause. November 1.
  • New York City Genealogical Research: Navigating Through The Five Boroughs by Michael L. Strauss, AG. November 8.
  • Using Non-Population Schedules for Context and Evidence by Jill Morelli. November 10.
  • British and Irish research: the differences by Brian Donovan. November 15.
  • Research in Federal Records: Some Assembly Required by Malissa Ruffner, JD, CG. November 21.
  • Understanding Alabama by Rorey Cathcart. November 29.
  • Finding Your Roots in Catholic Records by Lisa Toth Salinas. December 6.
  • I Thought He Was My Ancestor: Avoiding the Six Biggest Genealogy Mistakes by James M. Baker, PhD, CG. December 13.
  • Finding Your Nordic Parish of Birth by Jill Morelli. December 15.
  • The Law and the Reasonably Exhaustive (Re)Search by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL. December 19.
  • Palmetto Pride - South Carolina for Genealogist by Rorey Cathcart. December 20.
  • Problems and Pitfalls of a Reasonably Shallow Search by Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL. December 27.

Print the 2017 webinar brochure here.

See you online!