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May 16, 2011

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A "published" family legend has my gggfather drowning in the Mississippi River on 8 March 1846 while working as a "leadman" on the steamer GLOBE. This has never been documented or substantiated in any way, just word of mouth family legend. I have researched obituaries and every kind of record I could find from Nauvoo to St Louis without any record of this accidental death. One day I put "Richard Hardman drowning" in the search feature of GenealogyBank.com and got a hit. No it was not from a paper along the Mississippi, but rather from the SAYBROOK Connecticut Constitution dated 2 June 1847. The item describes Richard Hardman as one of the hands on board the steamer Globe falling from plank before the steamer reached the wharf. I feel this similarity of name, steamer name, situation are not just a fluke. The only variance is the location and the date. I am trying to establish the shipping routes of the Steamer Globe thinking perhaps it plied the Mississippi River as well as the east coast. It is very possible that Richard was with the steamer on a continuing basis trying to make a living for his family which was stranded in Nauvoo. I endorse GenealogyBank.com and hope this leads me to information to refute long standing unsubstantiated family legend.

Senior citizens cannot afford the above prices to join.. Come out cheaper going to a library or geneology center.

I signed up for one year of GenealogyBank.com and it probably will ONLY be one year. At $59 per year, the price is much too high for anyone outside of a professional genealogist (i.e., one who is getting paid to do this type of work and probably has the cost of things like GenealogyBank.com subsidized by their employer).

One other comment...I notice that a lot of the search tips I receive from Legacy blogs, other genealogists, webinar trainings, etc. always seem to reference activities that my mostly working class and poor relatives probably would never have come close to (e.g., professional societies, businesses they might have owned, Letters to the Editor, Society sections of newspapers, etc.). In fact, the ONLY example in the short article above that might apply to my ancestors is the "Wanted by the Law" one! :)

It would be nice to have someone write a book or a how-to article about how to research COMMON FOLK instead of the "royal" types that seem to appear in all the examples I come across during my reading and training.

I cancelled my subscription within 30 days. I did not find ANYTHING for any of my ancestors, or news papers for their areas. I have much better luck with footnote and ancestry.

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