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January 2015

Grab Your Genealogy by the Horns: Five Ways to Take Control of Your Research in 2015

Thanks to guest blogger, Lisa Alzo, for this great article!

IStock_000002185419SmallCan you believe that it is almost 2015? It is now time to evaluate what we accomplished during the previous 12 months, and set new goals for the coming year. “Out with the old and in with the new.” In the Chinese New Year, 2015 is designated as the year of the Goat (also translated as "Sheep" or "Ram").

Perhaps, like me, you have a list of genealogy-related tasks you plan to work on. If you want to grab your genealogy by the horns, here are five ways to take control of your research in 2015.

1. Define your goals. List all the tasks you hope to accomplish with your genealogy research in 2015 (find elusive ancestors, break down brick walls, start writing your family history, scan your photographs, organize your digital and paper files, etc.). Next, take your list a step further and break those items you've listed down—into weekly, monthly, quarterly, annual goals—to help set benchmarks for completing them. When you track your success, you will feel a sense of accomplishment. Once you declare your goals, don’t let them stay buried in a journal, or become part of your digital clutter. Print out your list and hang it in your office where you can see the goals and focus on them each day.

2. Let go of old habits. Genealogists are often creatures of habit. We often search the same databases in the same way or get distracted by the latest technology tools or apps. Some of our habits may also be hurting our research progress (for example, not keeping a research log, letting our filing get backlogged, or neglecting to copy down a source citation for records or documents we find. This year, identify your problem areas and make a point to do better.

3. Get organized. To do your best research, you need to set yourself up for success. Perhaps you need to clean up your genealogy database, create a template for your research log, file that stack of papers, scan those photographs, or locate the materials you need to write about your ancestors. Shop for supplies (archival safe filing products—check Hollinger Metal Edge, or your local office supply store) purchase or download software or apps you need (e.g. Legacy Family Tree software, Evernote, Dropbox, etc.). For help with organizing your materials, pick up a copy of the book, How to Archive Family Keepsakes by Denise May Levenick (aka The Family Curator). If scanning photographs is on your list, then another “must have” is Geoff Rasmussen’s book Digital Imaging Essentials.

4. Don’t go it alone. No genealogist is an island. As genealogists we are accustomed to working solo. Find a research partner who understands the challenges of chasing down ancestors, someone who can help you stay focused on your goals, and keep you motivated to make 2015 a great year for your genealogy. There are groups you can join too on Facebook or Google Plus. Check out the “Genealogy on Facebook” List compiled by Katherine R. Willson, to find a group that fits your interests. You don’t have to solve your brick wall problems alone when you have genea-friends who share the same passion, frustrations, and successes as you.

5. Hit the reset button. When you began your genealogy were you just a name collector? Do you question the validity of some of your data? Have you been inconsistent with source documentation? Do you practice start and stop genealogy and forget where you left off? If you find that your genealogy documentation is completely out of control, or discover major holes in your research, perhaps you need to step back, regroup and start again. If so, join professional genealogist Thomas MacEntee for the Genealogy Do-Over. There is a Facebook group (search for Genealogy Do-Over) you can join if you are planning to be a part of the Genealogy Do-Over, or if you just want to watch and track participant progress and learn new research tricks - this is the place for you to ask questions and also share advice about the Genealogy Do-Over. This is a 13-week program, broken down into specific tasks each week. The schedule of topics is posted at Geneabloggers. The list is representative and your mileage may differ . . . meaning that your research habits and specific research projects may warrant different areas of concentration in terms of skill building. Participants (and viewers) may agree or disagree with the topics or the order of the topics, so you can add or remove topics that you feel are not relevant to your specific genealogy research project. Each week, a post will appear at GeneaBloggers covering the Genealogy Do-Over topics. Posts will include tips, advice and resources. There will also be a special Legacy webinar “My Genealogy Do-Over - A Year of Learning from Research Mistakes” presented by Thomas MacEntee on Wednesday, January 21, 2015. Register for this webinar at FamilyTreeWebinars.com.

I am ready to make 2015 my best genealogy year ever. How about you?


New book and webinar for your iPad or tablet: Turn Your iPad into a Genealogy Powerhouse by Lisa Louise Cooke

Have an iPad or Android mobile device? Then you'll enjoy this book and webinar from Lisa Louise Cooke.

IpadBook: Turn Your iPad into a Genealogy Powerhouse - 18.95

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These pages are packed with the tools you need to get the most out of your tablet:

  • An in depth look at over 65 apps that are ideal for the genealogist
  • 32 Fabulous Tips and Tricks that will make you a power user
  • See it for yourself with recommended online videos

Do you have a tablet other than an iPad? No problem! Comparable apps available in Google Play are included. And the Tips and Tricks section will give you clues as to features to look for on your brand of tablet.

Author: Lisa Louise Cooke
Pages: 152
Size: 6"x9"
Date: September 2012
Binding: Paperback, Perfect Binding
Interior: Black and White, Indexed

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Presenter-9847Webinar: Genealogy on the Go with iPads and Tablets

Join FamilyTreeWebinars.com and webinar speaker, Lisa Louise Cooke, for a free webinar on Wednesday, January 7, 2015. Here's the webinar description:

Technology has brought much more than the convenience of digitized genealogical records to our home computers. It has also delivered an incredible level of portability to family history research! iPads and tablets are built for hitting the road and are ideally suited for genealogy due to the sleek lightweight size, gorgeous graphics and myriad of apps and tools. In this class you will discover the top apps and best practices that will make your mobile device a genealogical powerhouse!

Registerbut

 

FAM-2TLegacy Family Tree's mobile app: Families

Got an iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad, or an Android device? With the Families app from TelGen Limited you can easily transfer your Legacy Family Tree files from your PC to your iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad, or Android device, enabling them to be viewed and edited wherever you are. Any changes you make on these devices can then be synced back to your Legacy file on your PC.

Learn more or purchase here. Or watch the webinar here.


Now available! Evernote for Genealogists - Quick Reference Guide by Lisa Louise Cooke

Guide_EvernoteWINBrand new in the Legacy online store! 5.95

Evernote is the fastest-growing note-taking technology out there, so it is no wonder that it is incredibly popular with genealogists. You’ll want to keep this handy cheat sheet close at hand so that you can take advantage of all of Evernote’s powerful capabilities. Lisa Louise Cooke has designed this genealogy reference guide to be easy to use and chock full of ways to maximize your research note-taking. Windows AND Mac Editions.

Quick Reference Guide includes:

  • Getting Started Checklist
  • Quick Key Break Out Boxes – packed with keystrokes to speed up your use of Evernote
  • Specialized Note-taking Actions
  • How to Get the Most Out of Clipping
  • Tips for Maneuvering the Desktop Client
  • Genealogical Organization Recommendations
  • Little Known Search Strategies
  • Specialized Genealogy Focused Techniques such as Source Citation Tips, Clipping Recommendations, and Using Reminders
  • Evernote Premium vs. Free Comparison

Product Specifications:

  • 4 pages
  • PDF
  • Available for Windows or Mac
  • Author: Lisa Louise Cooke
  • Publisher: Genealogy Gems Publications

Price: 5.95

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How to create a 2015 birthday / anniversary calendar using Legacy Family Tree

With the new year approaching, why not resolve to be a better relative by remembering family birthdays and anniversaries? (Here's what happened when I forgot this year.)

Two features of Legacy Family Tree make this easy to do:

  • Legacy's birthday and anniversary reminders described here.
  • Legacy's Calendar Creator.

Legacy can create a birthday calendar, an anniversary calendar, or a combination of the two. There are options to include a cover picture, picture pages above each calendar month, and complete control over color, layout, shadows, fonts, page size, and more. The calendars can be blank or include the birthdates and anniversaries of the people already entered in your family file.

That's right! Because the information (birthdays and anniversaries) is already in your Legacy family file, Legacy will automatically add this to the calendar pages. With the who to include options, you can customize the calendar so only certain family lines are included. You even have the option to skip the anniversaries of divorced couples.

Get Started

To begin, make sure that you have installed Legacy Family Tree 8 Deluxe Edition available here. Then follow these steps:

  1. With Legacy open, click on the Reports tab, then the Other Reports button, then the Calendar Creator.
  2. Using the options on the six tabs, customize the calendar to your preferences.
  3. Print, and enjoy being the person in your family that never misses a birthday or anniversary!

Instead of including all 20,000+ individuals on my calendar, I selected to include "Only Tagged Living Individuals" (found on the Include tab). I previously "tagged" the descendants of my grandparents and my wife's parents so as to only include those closely related to me.

2015calendar

And wow, creating this calendar reminded me that come August 2015, I'll be turning 40. Hmmm....


Bagging a Live One - Connecting with Cousins You Never Knew You Had - free webinar by Mary Roddy now online for limited time

LogowhiteThe recording of today's webinar, "Bagging a Live One - Connecting with Cousins You Never Knew You Had," by Mary Kircher Roddy, is now available to view for free at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com. You're going to want to watch this one again! AND we had a fun after-webinar party too! Lots of great comments:

  • Thank you for providing me with sunshine on each Webinar Wed.
  • I really loved today's topic. It wasn't the run of the mill and although I took a week long forensic genealogy course, I think I learned more here !
  • I been searching my family for 53 years and still learned so much more from Mary Roddy! Thanks a million.

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 34 minute recording of "Researching Your North Carolina Ancestors" is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time.

Coupon code

Use webinar coupon code - liveone - for 10% off an annual or monthly webinar membership, valid through Monday, December 22, 2014.

Holiday Sale

Through December 31, 2014, take $10 off any new Legacy Family Tree software. Plus every Legacy QuickGuide and webinar CD have been discounted. No coupon required. Only at www.LegacyFamilyTreeStore.com.

Obituaries in GenealogyLegacy QuickGuide: Obituaries in Genealogy: A Research Tool by Cari A. Taplin - $2.95

Obituaries are not only a fantastic resource for beginning your genealogical research, but they can also be a great tool for enhancing what you’ve already collected. While their accuracy should always be questioned and verified (as with ANY source we encounter), obituaries can contain a large volume of information for an individual’s family. Finding obituaries, however, is not always easy. Many newspapers are being digitized and placed online, either for free or through a subscription service, but there are still many more that are only available in physical repositories in their original form or which have been captured on microfilm or microfiche. Understanding, locating and using obituaries in your research can take your family history to a new level.

The Obituaries in Genealogy Legacy QuickGuide™ contains valuable information on how to interpret the data in obituaries and death notices as well as newspaper articles and other listings. This handy 6-page PDF guide can be used on your computer or mobile device for anytime access.

Click here to purchase.

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 198 classes, 290 hours of genealogy education)
  • On-demand access to the instructor handouts (now 804 pages)
  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Chance for a members-only door prize during each live webinar

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year (that's about the cost of 5 webinar CDs)
  • Monthly membership: $9.95/month

Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • Genealogy on the Go with iPads and Tablets by Lisa Louise Cooke. January 7.
  • Tracking Migration Using the Big 4 U.S. Record Sources by Mary Hill. January 14.
  • Expanding Your Research from a Single Fact by Marian Pierre-Louis. January 16.
  • My Genealogy DO-Over - A Year of Learning from Research Mistakes by Thomas MacEntee. January 21.
  • Getting Started in Scrapbooking by Susan Budge. January 28.
  • One-Place Studies - Tracing the History of a Community by Kirsty Gray. February 4.
  • Step-by-Step - Finding Confederate Soldiers and Their Records by Mark Lowe. February 6.
  • Zigzagging through German Church Records by Jim Beidler. February 11.
  • Researching Your New Zealand Ancestors by Jan Gow. February 18.
  • Tap Into Your Inner Private Eye - 9 Strategies for Finding Living Relatives by Lisa Louise Cooke. February 25.
  • Researching with Karen! by Karen Clifford. March 4.
  • Technology and Techniques for Differentiating Two People with the Same Name by Geoff Rasmussen. March 6.
  • Crafting Ancestor Profiles from Start to Finish by Lisa Alzo. March 11.
  • Irish Genealogical Records in the 17th-19th Centuries by Judy Wight. March 18.
  • Where Does It Say That? Learning to Love Indirect Evidence by Chris Staats. March 25.
  • Genealogy 101, a 3-Session Course in Beginning Genealogy - Part 1 by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen. April 1.
  • American Revolution Genealogy by Beth Foulk. April 8.
  • Hookers, Crooks, and Kooks - Aunt Merle Didn't Run a Boarding House by Jana Sloan Broglin. April 10.
  • Ten Genealogical Lessons I Learned the Hard Way by Warren Bittner. April 15.
  • D-I-V-O-R-C-E! by Judy Russell. April 22.
  • Using Legacy with Specialized Studies - Legacy is for more than your family history by Tessa Keough. April 29.
  • Genealogy 101, a 3-Session Course in Beginning Genealogy - Part 2 by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen. May 6.
  • After You're Gone - Future-Proofing Your Genealogy Research by Thomas MacEntee (bonus webinar for annual/monthly webinar subscribers only). May 8.
  • GenealogyBank - The Power of Finding Our Ancestor's Stories by Tom Kemp. May 13.
  • Martha Benshura - Enemy Alien by Judy Russell. May 20.
  • Migration Patterns East of the Mississippi Prior to 1860 by Mary Hill. May 27.
  • Genealogy 101, a 3-Session Course in Beginning Genealogy - Part 3 by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen. June 3.
  • Tips for Planning a Successful Seminar by Jana Sloan Broglin. June 10.
  • 10 Tips for Using Legacy with Specialized Studies by Tessa Keough. June 12.
  • The Secret Lives of Women - Researching Female Ancestors Using the Sources They Left Behind by Gena Philibert-Ortega. July 1.
  • Pinning Your Family History by Thomas MacEntee. July 8.
  • Making a Federal Case Out of It by Judy Russell (bonus webinar for annual/monthly webinar subscribers only). July 10.
  • Researching with Karen! by Karen Clifford. July 15.
  • Have Swedish Roots and Don't Know How to Get Started? by Kathy Meade. July 22.
  • Storyboard Your Family History by Lisa Alzo. July 29.
  • What's in a Name? Trouble! by Ron Arons. August 5.
  • Power Platting - Technology Tools to Create Pictures from Property Descriptions by Chris Staats. August 12.
  • Discovering Your Kentucky Ancestors by Mark Lowe. August 19.
  • Digital Family Reunions by Devin Ashby. August 21.
  • German Names and Naming Patterns by Jim Beidler. August 26.
  • Break Down Brick Walls in Eastern European Research - Tips, Tools and Tricks by Lisa Alzo. September 2.
  • Research Your Swedish Ancestors in Living Color Using ArkivDigital Online by Kathy Meade. September 9.
  • Genealogy Serendipity - Listening For Our Ancestors by Geoff Rasmussen. September 11.
  • Researching Your Dutch Ancestors by Yvette Hoitink. September 16.
  • Researching Your Ancestors in England and Wales by Kirsty Gray. September 23.
  • Using Periodicals to Find Your Ancestors by Gena Philibert-Ortega. September 30.
  • Wearables and Genealogy - Wacky and Wild or Worth the Wait by Thomas MacEntee. October 7.
  • Colonial Immigration - The English Pioneers of Early America by Beth Foulk. October 14.
  • Billions of Records, Billions of Stories by Devin Ashby. October 16.
  • What Happened to the State of Frankland - Using Tennessee's Pre-Statehood Records by Mark Lowe. October 21.
  • Complex Evidence - What is It? How Does it Work? And Why Does it Matter? by Warren Bittner. October 28.
  • Researching with Karen! by Karen Clifford. November 4.
  • Organizing Your Genetic Genealogy by Diahan Southard. November 11.
  • Bringing it All Together and Leaving a Permanent Record by Tom Kemp. November 13.
  • Mapping Madness by Ron Arons. November 18.
  • Stories in Stone - Cemetery Research by Gail Blankenau. December 2.
  • Thinking about Becoming an Accredited Genealogist? by Apryl Cox and Kelly Summers. December 9.
  • Pointing Fingers at Ancestors' Siblings - Breaking Down Brick Walls with Collateral Research by Marian Pierre-Louis. December 16.

Click here to register. Or click here register for multiple webinars at the same time.

Print the 2015 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


Register for Webinar Wednesday - Connecting with Cousins You Never Knew You Had by Mary Kircher Roddy

LogowhiteBagging a live one is often a bigger rush than finding the dead ones. Bagging a live one who knows something about family history is gold. In this webinar Mary will show how you can find distant relatives, perhaps ones you never knew existed. Rather than trolling surname or location lists for other researchers with a common interest, you will come away with the skills to identify specific people to look for. These people may not be active researchers, but might be the ones who inherited the family bible or box of photos, or maybe they can pass on some stories Grandma told them. Collecting and organizing the bits of data – a birthdate, a location, a maiden name – will help you connect with a “new” cousin. If you are as lucky as Mary has been, some of these new cousins will soon become old friends.

Join us for the live webinar Wednesday, December 17, 2014 at 2pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion.

Download the syllabus

In preparation for the webinar, download the supplemental syllabus materials here. The syllabus is available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers. Log in here or subscribe here.

Registerbut

Or register for multiple webinars at once by clicking here.

Not sure if you already registered?

On the Upcoming Webinars tab, login to view the webinars you are already signed up for (available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers).

Test Your Webinar Connection

To ensure that your webinar connection is ready to go, click here.

Can't make it to the live event?

No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

Mroddy-100Mary Roddy, a Certified Public Accountant, has been a genealogist for 13 years, becoming interested in the subject in anticipation of an extended trip to Ireland. She earned a certificate from the Genealogy and Family History program at the University of Washington in 2005. She is an active member of the Seattle Genealogical Society, having served in multiple board positions and on the seminar and education committees and is a regular facilitator on the SGS Brick Wall panel. She lectures frequently on various genealogical topics in the Seattle area. Her articles, “Mark Golden: A Case Study in World War II Research,” and “Sailing in Their Wake,” were published in Family Chronicle Magazine in 2012 and 2013, respectively. Her article, “Five Tips for Online Newspaper Research,” appeared in the June/July 2013 issue of Internet Genealogy. She presented her research on Mark Golden as part of the Southern California Genealogy Jamboree webinar series. She is currently working on a novel set in the San Francisco area in 1900 and 1901, based on stories of several of her ancestors and their associates which she discovered in her genealogical research.

Add it to your Google Calendar

With our Google Calendar button, you will never forget our upcoming webinars. Simply click the button to add it to your calendar. You can then optionally embed the webinar events (and even turn them on and off) into your own personal calendar. If you have already added the calendar, you do not have to do it again - the new webinar events will automatically appear.

Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Wednesday, December 17, 2014 at:

  • 2pm Eastern (U.S.)
  • 1pm Central
  • 12pm Mountain
  • 11am Pacific
  • 7pm GMT

Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email both 1 day and 1 hour prior to the live webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone.

We look forward to seeing you all there!


Legacy and Sourcing: Lumpers vs. Splitters

The subject of source lumpers vs. splitters comes up all the time on the Legacy User Group (LUG) email list. Legacy user, Wendy Howard, posted the best explanation that any of us have seen and she received several compliments on it. Rather than try to explain it myself, I asked Wendy for her permission to post her email here. Here is Wendy’s response to fellow LUG Lister, Dennis. Great job, Wendy! 

Dennis' question:  

Okay folks, Newbie Dude here but, I'm seriously confused by all the options available regarding Master Sources and Details.

Since it is possible to do in both places, is it best to attach copies of documents (or pictures) to the "Master Source" or, as part of the "Detail" (using the Source Writer), which is the best place to use to add them? Specifically, I referring to attaching copies of Birth/Death Certificates, Census Pages, etc.

Wendy's reply:

It depends on how you use the Master Source, whether in your particular situation it is better to attach the image to the Master Source or the Source Detail.

An example... you have your great-grandmother's birth certificate. Ask yourself this question - do you set up a new Master Source for that certificate alone, or do you use a Master Source that covers all birth certificates for that country/state/county/whatever? There isn't a right answer here, only the answer that works for you.

Some people will set up a new Master Source for each certificate they acquire. We call that "splitting" on this mailing list; you end up with a lot of Master Sources this way. In this situation you probably won't use the Source Detail very much, and it's appropriate to attach an image to the Master Source.

Other people will set up a Master Source for all birth certificates they acquire of the same type, and then put the information specific to each item in the Source Detail. In this situation, I'd attach an image to the Source Detail, so that each citation has an image relevant to its use. We call this "lumping" on this mailing list.

I tend to do a bit of both. When I first started entering sources, I set up a separate Master Source for each certificate I had. Later on, when I'd learned more and thought about what I wanted, I changed to using one Master Source for all New Zealand birth certificates, and another for all New Zealand birth registrations (a copy of the Registrar's book, we're a bit different in this country!), and others for marriages and deaths, and repeat for England, and Scotland, and for each state in Australia from which I've acquired documents, and so on.

One day I might change all those early entries and get rid of the Master Sources that cover one piece of paper alone, but then I may never get around to that. Either way, the information is still stored and can be properly interpreted by anyone reading my data.

Where I've cited a book, I set up a Master Source for the book as a whole, and then in the Source Detail I put the information about which page a piece of information came from. Here, I could put an image of the book cover in the Master, and an image of a page in the Detail, if I so desired.

So think about what works for you, and go with that. Keep asking questions here - the program is very flexible, and there are usually at least two ways of doing something. Which is right, depends on your preferences and expectations.

Hope this helps. :-)

Wendy

The LUG email list is a great place to get your questions answered. If you would like to join the group you can sign up HERE. It is the second option, Legacy User Group.


Brand New! Access to Webinar Chat Logs now available for webinar subscribers

Our Legacy Family Tree Webinar Series, one of the hottest things in genealogy, just got even better. Hard to believe, especially since we just announced our amazing 2015 lineup with 58 new webinars! We are now adding the Chat Logs from our live webinars to the membership archives.

Chat Logs

If you have ever attended one of our live webinars, then you know how valuable the chat logs are. They contain many valuable resources such as answers to your questions, hyperlinks that presenters mention, fun conversation, and more. Our most recent webinar's chat log contained 7 pages of supplemental information - most of which was in addition to the information in the instructor's syllabus. Until today, you had to be in attendance at the live webinar to have access to these logs. The logs will available in our membership archives. Annual or monthly webinar subscribers have access for the duration of their membership. They're not all up there yet, but will be available in the upcoming weeks. Just look for the new "Download Chat Log" button for the webinar you are interested in after you have logged in:

Chat

Another recent benefit

We also recently added the ability for our webinar subscribers to view which upcoming webinars they have registered for. On the Upcoming Webinars page, you will see the Registered image next to each webinars where you have registered. This is also available on the page where you can register for multiple webinars at a time.

Registered

Membership benefits

While all of our live webinars are free (except for the 2 members-only webinars in 2015), you can have access to the recordings of all of our past webinars by becoming an annual or monthly webinar subscriber. Look at what members receive:

  • Unlimited access to our recorded webinars for the during of your membership (currently 197 classes, 289 hours)
  • Unlimited access to the instructors' handouts (currently 804 pages)
  • Access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • Occasional members-only webinars
  • Chance for a bonus subscribers-only door prize during each live webinar
  • 5% off anything in the FamilyTreeWebinars.com store (must be logged in at checkout)

Subscribe today!

With all of these membership benefits, what are you waiting for?

Yearly membership - $49.95

Monthly membership - $9.95

I enjoyed this unsolicited comment from one of our subscribers, Terry, in an email I received just today:

"You guys are amazing! Thanks for giving us a product that exceeds all expectations! I so appreciate the opportunity to go back and view webinars because I work full-time and it is hard to catch the seminar with meetings, etc. and even harder to get much out of it while at work with all the interruptions, etc. So, the archives is a blessing to us who like to continually learn. Nothing like having great resources at our finger tips. Keep up the great work!! And thanks for making learning and preserving our histories so much easier!!" - Terry


FamilySearch Records Update - more than 125.4 million indexed records and images added

FamilySearch has added more than 125.4 million indexed records and images to collections from the United States. Notable collection updates include the 124,060,301 indexed records from the Find A Grave Index collection; the 830,416 indexed records and images from the US, Michigan Obituaries, 1820–2006 collection; and the 497,490 images from the US, Washington, County Records, 1803–2010 collection. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the worldís historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Collection

Indexed Records

Digital Images

Comments

Find A Grave Index

124,060,301

0

New indexed record collection.

US, Michigan Obituaries, 1820–2006

761,569

68,847

New indexed records and images collection.

US, Montana, Lake County Records, 1857–2010

11,217

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection.

US, Montana, Sanders County Records, 1866–2010

5,416

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection.

US, Tennessee, White County Records, 1809–1975

0

124

Added images to an existing collection.

US, Utah, Weber County Marriages, 1887–1938

0

92,654

New browsable image collection.

US, Washington, County Records, 1803–2010

0

497,490

Added images to an existing collection.


Researching Your North Carolina Ancestors - Free webinar by Mark Lowe now online for limited time

LogowhiteThe recording of today's webinar, "Researching Your North Carolina Ancestors," by Mark Lowe, is now available to view for free at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com. Lots of great comments:

  • The best webinar ever. I have so many ancestors from NC and this webinar has been one of the most helpful for me. J Mark always delivers. Thanks so much Geoff and J Mark for a great webinar. Very grateful for the Legacy webinars.
  • This was the most informative webinar EVER! Mark gave us so much to consider and so many websites that I will be busy forever! Thank you Legacy and Mark Lowe.
  • One of the best genealogy lectures I've ever attended anywhere! Thank you!

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 38 minute recording of "Researching Your North Carolina Ancestors" is now available to view in our webinar archives.

Coupon code

Use webinar coupon code - carolina - for 10% off an annual or monthly webinar membership, valid through Monday, December 15, 2014.

Holiday Sale

Through December 31, 2014, take $10 off any new Legacy Family Tree software. Plus every Legacy QuickGuide and webinar CD have been discounted. No coupon required. Only at www.LegacyFamilyTreeStore.com.

Legacy QuickGuide: North Carolina Genealogy - $2.95

Looking to find those elusive Tar Heel State ancestors? The North Carolina Genealogy Legacy QuickGuide™ contains useful information including a timeline of North Carolina history events, tips on North Carolina research strategy, outline of major immigrant groups, and more. Also included are links to websites and resources covering vital records, church records, census records, as well as general North Carolina resources. This handy 8-page PDF guide can be used on your computer or mobile device for anytime access.

North Carolina is home to many “firsts”: one of the original Thirteen Colonies; Virginia Dare, the first white child born in the New World; America’s first gold rush in Cabarrus County; the first public university in the United States, the University of North Carolina; and home to the Wright Brothers’ first flight at Kitty Hawk.

Click here to purchase.

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Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • Bagging a Live One - Connecting with Cousins You Never Knew You Had by Mary Kircher Roddy. December 17.
  • Genealogy on the Go with iPads and Tablets by Lisa Louise Cooke. January 7.
  • Tracking Migration Using the Big 4 U.S. Record Sources by Mary Hill. January 14.
  • Expanding Your Research from a Single Fact by Marian Pierre-Louis. January 16.
  • My Genealogy DO-Over - A Year of Learning from Research Mistakes by Thomas MacEntee. January 21.
  • Getting Started in Scrapbooking by Susan Budge. January 28.
  • One-Place Studies - Tracing the History of a Community by Kirsty Gray. February 4.
  • Step-by-Step - Finding Confederate Soldiers and Their Records by Mark Lowe. February 6.
  • Zigzagging through German Church Records by Jim Beidler. February 11.
  • Researching Your New Zealand Ancestors by Jan Gow. February 18.
  • Tap Into Your Inner Private Eye - 9 Strategies for Finding Living Relatives by Lisa Louise Cooke. February 25.
  • Researching with Karen! by Karen Clifford. March 4.
  • Technology and Techniques for Differentiating Two People with the Same Name by Geoff Rasmussen. March 6.
  • Crafting Ancestor Profiles from Start to Finish by Lisa Alzo. March 11.
  • Irish Genealogical Records in the 17th-19th Centuries by Judy Wight. March 18.
  • Where Does It Say That? Learning to Love Indirect Evidence by Chris Staats. March 25.
  • Genealogy 101, a 3-Session Course in Beginning Genealogy - Part 1 by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen. April 1.
  • American Revolution Genealogy by Beth Foulk. April 8.
  • Hookers, Crooks, and Kooks - Aunt Merle Didn't Run a Boarding House by Jana Sloan Broglin. April 10.
  • Ten Genealogical Lessons I Learned the Hard Way by Warren Bittner. April 15.
  • D-I-V-O-R-C-E! by Judy Russell. April 22.
  • Using Legacy with Specialized Studies - Legacy is for more than your family history by Tessa Keough. April 29.
  • Genealogy 101, a 3-Session Course in Beginning Genealogy - Part 2 by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen. May 6.
  • After You're Gone - Future-Proofing Your Genealogy Research by Thomas MacEntee (bonus webinar for annual/monthly webinar subscribers only). May 8.
  • GenealogyBank - The Power of Finding Our Ancestor's Stories by Tom Kemp. May 13.
  • Martha Benshura - Enemy Alien by Judy Russell. May 20.
  • Migration Patterns East of the Mississippi Prior to 1860 by Mary Hill. May 27.
  • Genealogy 101, a 3-Session Course in Beginning Genealogy - Part 3 by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen. June 3.
  • Tips for Planning a Successful Seminar by Jana Sloan Broglin. June 10.
  • 10 Tips for Using Legacy with Specialized Studies by Tessa Keough. June 12.
  • The Secret Lives of Women - Researching Female Ancestors Using the Sources They Left Behind by Gena Philibert-Ortega. July 1.
  • Pinning Your Family History by Thomas MacEntee. July 8.
  • Making a Federal Case Out of It by Judy Russell (bonus webinar for annual/monthly webinar subscribers only). July 10.
  • Researching with Karen! by Karen Clifford. July 15.
  • Have Swedish Roots and Don't Know How to Get Started? by Kathy Meade. July 22.
  • Storyboard Your Family History by Lisa Alzo. July 29.
  • What's in a Name? Trouble! by Ron Arons. August 5.
  • Power Platting - Technology Tools to Create Pictures from Property Descriptions by Chris Staats. August 12.
  • Discovering Your Kentucky Ancestors by Mark Lowe. August 19.
  • Digital Family Reunions by Devin Ashby. August 21.
  • German Names and Naming Patterns by Jim Beidler. August 26.
  • Break Down Brick Walls in Eastern European Research - Tips, Tools and Tricks by Lisa Alzo. September 2.
  • Research Your Swedish Ancestors in Living Color Using ArkivDigital Online by Kathy Meade. September 9.
  • Genealogy Serendipity - Listening For Our Ancestors by Geoff Rasmussen. September 11.
  • Researching Your Dutch Ancestors by Yvette Hoitink. September 16.
  • Researching Your Ancestors in England and Wales by Kirsty Gray. September 23.
  • Using Periodicals to Find Your Ancestors by Gena Philibert-Ortega. September 30.
  • Wearables and Genealogy - Wacky and Wild or Worth the Wait by Thomas MacEntee. October 7.
  • Colonial Immigration - The English Pioneers of Early America by Beth Foulk. October 14.
  • Billions of Records, Billions of Stories by Devin Ashby. October 16.
  • What Happened to the State of Frankland - Using Tennessee's Pre-Statehood Records by Mark Lowe. October 21.
  • Complex Evidence - What is It? How Does it Work? And Why Does it Matter? by Warren Bittner. October 28.
  • Researching with Karen! by Karen Clifford. November 4.
  • Organizing Your Genetic Genealogy by Diahan Southard. November 11.
  • Bringing it All Together and Leaving a Permanent Record by Tom Kemp. November 13.
  • Mapping Madness by Ron Arons. November 18.
  • Stories in Stone - Cemetery Research by Gail Blankenau. December 2.
  • Thinking about Becoming an Accredited Genealogist? by Apryl Cox and Kelly Summers. December 9.
  • Pointing Fingers at Ancestors' Siblings - Breaking Down Brick Walls with Collateral Research by Marian Pierre-Louis. December 16.

Click here to register. Or click here register for multiple webinars at the same time.

Print the 2015 webinar brochure here.

See you online!