Tuesday's Tip - Printing Blank Forms (Beginner)

TT - Printing Blank Forms

Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

Tuesday's Tip - Printing Blank Forms (Beginner)

You can print blank Individual Reports, Family Group Reports, and Pedigree Chart Reports which are great to pass out at family gatherings. I have learned things this way that opened doors for new research.

Go to Reports > Family Group. As soon as it opens you will see the Blank Report button. You can also click the Pedigree or Individual tab at the top to get to their blank reports.

Blank Reports
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When you click the Blank Report button on the Family Group Report you will get a dialog box where you can customize the report before you Preview/Print.

Blank Family Group Report
(click image to enlarge)

 

When you click the Blank Report button for either the Pedigree or Individual Chart Report you will not see a separate dialog box with options. It will go straight to the Print Preview. You can set the number of generations you want to see on the Pedigree Chart Report by using the same option that you would use if you were printing a regular report.

Blank Pedigree Chart
(click image to enlarge)

 

You can also save these as PDFs and email them to your family members.  I have found most people are pretty cooperative when you ask them to help you put together the family tree. I always like to offer them a printout after I get everything entered which they usually appreciate. 

Don't forget to source the information when you enter it into Legacy. We have SourceWriter templates for Family Group Sheets and for Pedigree Charts. 

 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips check out the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis, CG® is part of the Legacy Family Tree team at MyHeritage. She handles the enhancement suggestions that come in from our users as well as writing for Legacy News. You can usually find her hanging out on the Legacy User Group Facebook page answering questions and posting tips.

 


Tuesday's Tip - Splitting a File (Advanced)

 Splitting a File

Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

Splitting a File (Advanced)

“To split or not to split, that is the question.” A common question that comes in to Legacy is asking how to split a file. Most people that want to split their file want to have their information in one file and their spouse’s family in another. My question is, why would you want to do that? It is much easier working with one file for three reasons.

  • You won’t have to switch back and forth between files while researching
  • You won’t have duplication between the files (your spouse and descendants). If you update one file you will have to go in and update the other one
  • If you end up finding some sort of link between your family and your spouse's, you will want to combine the file anyway. My husband is my 9th cousin so there you go

That doesn’t mean I only have one. I have my main file that has my personal family research in it. I also have a file for my One-Name Study. Technically these people are attached to my family tree but it is just easier to deal with this group of people separately because I use different research tactics and I have to look at all of this data in a different way. I am also capturing a lot of people that I can't connect to my line. I have a file for everyone that is buried in my church cemetery showing how everyone is connected. It is a very old cemetery and most everyone is connected in some way. I did this so that the church would have this information. I rarely take on private clients anymore but when I do their information goes in separate files. I have several test files because of my work with Legacy but most people won’t have that. The only time you must split your file is if you start approaching the 2 GB file size limit. Most people will never get close to this size. However, f you still want to split your file you can.

Dave Berdan (Legacy developer) wrote a comprehensive article explaining how to split a file using the Split Screen view.  You can read the article HERE. I use a different method and I wanted to explain how I do it so that you have two different ways to choose from. 

Before you get started you will want to do a few things:

  • Make sure that you don't have any broken media links. It is better to deal with them now than later
  • Go to View > Trees. Click Refresh over on the right. You are going to need to pay attention to this screen. In theory you will have one tree but most of the time you will have added isolated mini trees of people who you are not sure how they fit in. For now just make a mental note of what is there
  • Do a check/repair on your file
  • Backup your file

Now you can get started. Find the couple where you want to make the split and break the bond. For example, let's say you want your information in one file and your spouse's information in another. Break the marriage link between the two of you. 

Now go back to View > Trees and click Refresh again. You will see a new isolated tree pop up. Tag everyone in this new tree on an unused tag.  Now you are going to go to File > Export > Export to a new Legacy Family File. Export only the tagged individuals (use the Record Selection button at the bottom). Make sure you give this new file a distinctive name so that you know what is in it, something like James Sanders Lewis Family.

Open this new file, look around, make sure everything looks good and then check your media links, do a check/repair, and backup this file.

Now open your original file. You will want to rename this file to better reflect what is in it, something like Michele Lynn Simmons Family. Before you delete the tagged people out of this file, you might need to go back and relink the two people you unlinked and UNtag that base person IF you want them to remain in your file. If not, don't worry about it. Now you can delete the group of tagged people you just exported by going to Tools > Advanced Deleting. Make sure you choose the right tag. Again, you will want to check the media links, do a check/repair and then backup this file.

NOTE: One thing you have to watch out for is if the two lines you are breaking apart are related to each other in more than one way. For example, if the husband and wife in our example also happen to be 5th cousins, twice removed and you have that relationship in your file you will need to break that relationship too.

I like this method better than Dave's because it makes more sense to me. I use searching and tagging all the time but I rarely use split screen so I am not an expert with it. Just remember to think twice before you split and have a good reason to do so. 

 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips check out the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis, CG® is part of the Legacy Family Tree team at MyHeritage. She handles the enhancement suggestions that come in from our users as well as writing for Legacy News. You can usually find her hanging out on the Legacy User Group Facebook page answering questions and posting tips.

 


Tuesday's Tip - The Legacy Cloud Backup (Beginner)

TT - Legacy Cloud Backup

Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

The Legacy Cloud Backup (Beginner)

Legacy offers free cloud backup service for your Legacy file (Legacy 9 and later). This is available for both Legacy Standard and Legacy Deluxe users. There are a few things that you need to know about this service:

  • This is in addition to, not instead of, your normal backup routine. It is an added layer of protection
  • You can only back up your Legacy data file and not your associated media
  • When you back up to the Legacy Cloud your previous backup will be overwritten. If you have more than one Legacy file, you can back up each one but only the most current copy of each is retained
  • No one has access to your data (it is password protected)
  • If you forget your password, we will reset it. You can then log in with a temporary password and change it (this is under the Manage Account link)

Go to File > Backup File

Backup screen
(click image to enlarge)

 

Before you will be able to backup to the Legacy Cloud you will need to register for an account. You can do that by clicking the Manage Account link. Once you are registered you will notice that you can do your normal backup routine and the cloud backup at the same time.  When you click Backup you will see a process monitor showing that the backup is taking place. When the backup is finished you will be returned to the screen you were on.

If you ever need to restore a cloud backup, go to File > Restore File

Restoring a file
(click image to enlarge)

 

You can see that you can restore one of your normal backups (local) or you can restore from the Legacy Cloud.  Either way, you will be told that all files must be closed before a restore. If you choose to restore from the Legacy Cloud you will then see this:

Files available to restore
(click image to enlarge)

 

You will simply highlight the file you want to restore and then click Restore and follow the prompts. The first two entries in my list are from old test runs I did. The last entry is just the Sample file which I work with when doing beta testing and screenshots. You can delete unneeded backups by highlighting the backup, selecting Options and then Delete Selected Backup. I did that and now you can see my two real backups.

Michele's backups
(click image to enlarge)

 

As long as you understand how the Legacy Cloud Backup works and its limitations, it is a great addition to your backup routine.

 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips check out the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis, CG® is part of the Legacy Family Tree team at MyHeritage. She handles the enhancement suggestions that come in from our users as well as writing for Legacy News. You can usually find her hanging out on the Legacy User Group Facebook page answering questions and posting tips.

 

 

 


Source Quality Not Quantity

Source Quality Not Quantity

No one explains this concept better than Elizabeth Shown Mills:

Citing a source is not an end to itself. Our goal is to rely only upon the best possible source. In the research stage, we record every source consulted, regardless of our immediate opinion of its value. When we recognize that a source is deficient or that a better source might exist, the better source should be sought and used. When we convert our raw notes into an interpretive account, we want our information and conclusions to be supported by the evidence of the highest quality possible. Toward that end, source citations have two purposes:

  • to record the specific location of each piece of data; and
  • to record details that affect the use or evaluation of that data.[1]

I am going to give you a few simple examples to further explain this concept and then I am going to show you how to record all of this in Legacy.

Let's say you consult an online state death index and you find your ancestor's date and place of death. You record the online index in Legacy as your source. You then order a copy of the death certificate. You receive it in the mail and now you record a new source. When you print a report do you want both sources to print? The answer is no. You will use the state issued death certificate as your source for the person's date/place of death because when you weigh the evidence the certificate trumps the index. 

Let's say you have the following sources for a person's date/place of birth; death certificate, obituary, and their tombstone. The informant for the death certificate, the obituary, and the tombstone is probably the same person so I wouldn't even look at these as three distinct sources (assuming all three agree). You would record all of these sources in Legacy but would you want all three to print in a report?  No.

Let's say you are using the 1880, 1900, 1910, 1920 and 1930 census to show a couple was married. Do you want all of these census citations to print for their marriage. No, one is sufficient. Even better would be to find their marriage certificate and then use that.

In Legacy there is a way mark your sources so that even though you have recorded everything that you have consulted you can restrict what actually prints. I am using Asa Clark Brown [1] in the Sample File that comes with Legacy as an example. Open Asa's Assigned Sources screen. There are five sources for Asa's Birth. Asa's Bible is the best source. The other sources listed support the evidence contained in the Bible but the Bible is what I will use as my source citation.

Assigned Sources screen
(click image to enlarge)


Click Edit Detail (NOT Edit Source) for the first citation that you want to restrict and then UNcheck the box to include the citation on the report. Do this for all of the citations that you don't want to appear.

Citation Detail screen
(click image to enlarge)


Now when you run a report only the one citation appears. This gives you the best of both worlds. You can record all of your sources so you can properly analyze them and weigh them against each other but you can also restrict what prints in your reports so that you don't clutter them up with unneeded citations. You want to record all of the sources you consulted for your research notes but your reader doesn't necessarily need to see them. There will be times when you will need to record more than one source in a single footnote which is perfectly okay. You might need multiple sources to prove a single piece of evidence especially when you are dealing with indirect evidence. You just don't want to be redundant by including sources that aren't needed.

Source Citation
(click image to enlarge)


So what is all this about weighing evidence against each other? Again, Elizabeth Shown Mills explains it best in her Evidence Analysis Process Map (pdf). Legacy has a built-in tool to help you with this.  Go back to Asa's Assigned Sources and this time open the Detail screen for the Brown Bible. You will see a button to Analyze Source Quality.

Analyze Source Quality option
(click image to enlarge)


You can see this looks very similar to the Evidence Analysis Process Map. I have marked the Bible as:

Original Source - Geoff has the actual Bible in his possession
Secondary Information - Remember, this is the source for Asa's BIRTH. Even though Asa recorded the information himself he wasn't in a position at the time of his birth to be a reliable witness. He recorded the date of birth that his mother told him
Direct Evidence - It directly answers the question, "When was Asa born?"

Source Quality screen
(click image to enlarge)


This same source is used in many places and the evidence analysis will vary a bit depending on what you are using this source for. For example, let's say Asa and his wife's marriage date is recorded in the Bible. Now it will be Primary Information because Asa was at his own marriage and he is reporting the date with first hand knowledge. 

You can go even deeper than this because you have to take some other things into consideration. What was the publication date of the Bible? Are the entries all in the same hand? Are some of the entries before or after the primary owner was born or had died? You need to look at EVERY source you use critically. 

So where do you put this kind of information?  Here is another shot of the Source Detail screen. You can see I have added a comment for the provenance and my analysis. This is all made up information. I am only using this as an illustration.

Adding Comments
(click image to enlarge)


Notice that the box to Add these Comments to the Source Citation on Reports is checked but I have some additional control of how this will print. After you have closed out these screens go to Options > Customize > Sources > Option 7.2.  Remember, you want your sources to be complete but also as concise as possible for readability. I only want this extra information to print once.

Option 7.2
(click image to enlarge)


You will be recording all of the sources that you consult but sometimes you need to restrict what is exported to make the report more concise and readable. Having your reader wade through 15 redundant sources will never be better than reading one pertinent source. 


[1] Elizabeth Shown Mills, Evidence Explained, Citing History Sources from Artifacts to Cyberspace, 3rd. ed. (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2015), 42-43.

 

Michele Simmons Lewis, CG® is part of the Legacy Family Tree team at MyHeritage. She handles the enhancement suggestions that come in from our users as well as writing for Legacy News. You can usually find her hanging out on the Legacy User Group Facebook page answering questions and posting tips.


Tuesday's Tip - Working With Addresses Part III (Intermediate)

TT - Working with addresses part III

Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

Working With Addresses Part III (Intermediate)

 In Working with Addresses Part I I showed you how to record mailing addresses so that you can print Address Labels for mass mailings and create Name Tags for events or for file folder labels. In Part II we covered event addresses for both vital events and custom events and how this affects reports. In Part III we will look at Repository Addresses and how they work with Sources and the To-Do List. 

Repository Addresses are pretty straightforward. You will be recording all of the information about an archive, library, courthouse etc. There are just a couple of things to watch out for. 

When you record addresses for repositories that will be used in sources you might have to do some special formatting to get them to read out the way you want in your source citation. This requires a little bit of trial and error on your part. One of the nifty things you can use are Privacy Brackets to record things that you need to know but you don't necessarily want to print in your source citation. [[Anything in between double brackets will not print]] unless you specifically override the privacy settings. Here is an example from my personal file:

Repository Address
(click image to enlarge)

 Notice that I have the county in privacy brackets. I want my source citation to print out the name and the city (which is does) but for the repository I only want "Circuit Court" because the name of the county is part of the citation itself. The problem I have is that I have a lot of different Circuit Courts on my Master Repository Address List and I can't tell them apart unless I have memorized every county seat for every county. Here is what it looks like on the Master Repository Address List. It is a little squished because of the constraints of a screenshot.

Master Repository Address List
(click image to enlarge)

 

And this is how my source citation will actually print:

Marion County, Mississippi, Marriage Book 2: 310, Simmons-Graham, 1889; Circuit Court, Columbia.

I talked a bit about some of the other things you can enter on an address in Working with Addresses Part I but when I am working with repositories the Notes field is especially important to me. This is where I record any specific contact person I have, the policies for obtaining copies of documents, hours of operation etc. I have said many times in my articles that I want to keep as much information in a single computer program (Legacy) that I can. It saves me time and frustration. 

When working with the To-Do List being able to filter by repository is a great tool to have. You can take a printout of open tasks for a specific repository when you visit that repository. When working with To-Do tasks make sure you fill out all the fields completely or you won't have the advantage of being able to filter the list every which way. I will be doing a comprehensive article on the To-Do List soon (probably more than one).

Filtering by Repository isn't on the main Filtering screen. 

Filtering screen
(click image to enlarge)

 

It is on the Print screen.

Print options
(click image to enlarge)

 

We will talk more about To-Dos in a future article but I did want to show you how to filter by a repository address.

I hope this series of articles on the Master Address Lists has been a help. How you record information in Legacy affects reports and other types of printouts so you need to take the time to play around with your data entry a bit so make sure your output is how you want it. Consistency is key.

 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips check out the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis, CG® is part of the Legacy Family Tree team at MyHeritage. She handles the enhancement suggestions that come in from our users as well as writing for Legacy News. You can usually find her hanging out on the Legacy User Group Facebook page answering questions and posting tips.


Working with DNA Using MyHeritage and Legacy

Working with DNA Using MyHeritage and Legacy

MyHeritage and Legacy will help you with two parts of your DNA puzzle. MyHeritage is the testing company and Legacy is your master genealogy database where you keep track of all of your information. Legacy 10 will have a direct sync to MyHeritage which will make working with DNA matches even easier. 

Our FREE Hands-On with MyHeritage DNA webinar will walk you through using the DNA tools on the MyHeritage website. I highly recommend that you watch this video so that you don't miss any of the features that are available to you. I learned several things even though I have had my DNA on MyHeritage for quite some time.

You can DNA test directly with MyHeritage or you can upload your raw DNA file from another company. You can upload your raw DNA for FREE and their matching service is also FREE. MyHeritage will analyze your DNA and give you a match list of everyone who shares DNA with you. To take advantage of all of MyHeritage's matching tools you need to upload what you know about your family tree and attach your DNA to it. You can have a FREE Basic site that allows you to have up to 250 people in your tree and up to 500 MB of storage space.

For DNA matching you need to have, at the very least, your absolute direct line (pedigree minus siblings). Again, there are some people that don't have this information and that is okay. MyHeritage's DNA matching will help you fill in the blanks when you start communicating with your matches. My absolute direct line is only 173 people so you can see that this is doable with the free account. After you work with your matches and start growing your tree, you can easily move up to a paid subscription. MyHeritage offers tiered pricing so that you only pay for what you need.

Legacy will help you record all of the information you glean from MyHeritage so that you can work with your matches. You can use the FREE Standard version of Legacy which is fully functional. We are confident that once you use Legacy for a bit you will want to upgrade to the full Deluxe version which has all of the nifty bells and whistles. Working with Legacy in conjunction with MyHeritage it is a two way street. You can upload your family tree to MyHeritage via a gedcom export and you will also be taking information from MyHeritage and inputting it into Legacy.  Again, once we have the direct sync up and running this process will become easier and faster.

There are two important things you can do in Legacy to help keep track of your matches. You can add your DNA matches along with all of their contact information to Legacy and you can record how those people connect to you, if known. It is very important to me to be able to record as much as I can in a single program. This saves me time and it keeps me from missing important clues because my information is scattered between software programs. Here are two articles that will show you how to do both of these tasks.

Keeping Track of DNA Contacts in Legacy

Recording DNA Matches

You can also use Legacy's To-Do List to keep track of your efforts. It functions as a research log to keep track of what you need to do, what you are in the process of doing, and what you have done. It will keep you from duplicating your efforts. I can barely remember what I had for breakfast let alone all of the things I have done while working on a brick wall. Be on the lookout for a future article on this topic. 

I hope you noticed all of the FREEs in the above article. I don't think you will find any genealogy company that offers so many things for free as a service to the genealogical community. 

On a personal note,  I have my mother's autosomal DNA everywhere. I have it on every testing site and every 3rd party site.  Since my maternal side is 100% German (all lines have been in Central Europe since the 1600s) she has very few matches. For example, her highest match on GEDmatch is 30.4 cM. She only has 18 matches that are over 20 cM. On 23andMe her top match is 28 cM. On FTDNA her highest match is 47 cM which is a bit better. MyHeritage has more international testers so she has more useful matches there. Her top matches are 124.6 cM, 71. 1 cM, 54 cM, and 51.8 cM and all of these testers are in Germany and The Netherlands. My mother has 73 matches on MyHeritage that are greater than 20 cM. My Heritage's DNA has been very helpful to me with my mother's lines.

 

Michele Simmons Lewis, CG® is part of the Legacy Family Tree team at MyHeritage. She handles the enhancement suggestions that come in from our users as well as writing for Legacy News. You can usually find her hanging out on the Legacy User Group Facebook page answering questions and posting tips.

 


Tuesday's Tip - Working With Addresses Part II (Intermediate)

TT - Working with addresses part II

Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

Working With Addresses Part II (Intermediate)

In Working with Addresses Part I I showed you how to record mailing addresses so that you can print Address Labels for mass mailings and create Name Tags for family events or for file folder labels. In Part II of this series we will look how to enter addresses for events. 

When working with event addresses the greatest impact will be in reports. I will be discussing this a bit more at the end of this article but I wanted to show you WHERE in reports you will see the options for addresses. Open the report and go to Report Options and then make sure you are on the Include tab.

Address options
(click image to enlarge)

 

If you click the Event Options button you see in the above screenshot you will then see the option to display the custom event addresses.

Custom event addresses
(click image to enlarge)

 

Now we can add some addresses. To get to vital event addresses you will click on the + (plus) sign next to the vital event field.

Vital event addresses
(click image to enlarge)

 

To get to the marriage address you will need to open the marriage screen and click the Address icon.

Marriage event address
(click image to enlarge)

 

To get to a custom event address (and this also applies to marriage events) you will open that event and then click the Address icon.

Custom event address
(click image to enlarge)

 

As an example I will be working with a Burial Address.  I clicked the + (plus) sign next to the Burial Location field on the Family View and then selected Burial Address. I get the now familiar address screen but this time it is totally blank.

Blank burial address
(click image to enlarge)

 

The name is left blank because the name you will be entering will not be the person's name that you are working with. Here is what it looks like after I have filled it in.

Burial address
(click image to enlarge)

 

If you go back to Working With Addresses Part I you will see more information about how to use the sort string and the other options on this screen. Once you have added an address the + (plus) sign or the address icon will color in showing that you have added information there. Also, you only have to enter an address once. The next time you need it all you have to do is click the Address List button over on the right and choose it from the list.  The Master Address List works the same way as any of the other Master Lists. You can highlight an address and then click Show List to see who all is using it.

I need to explain that there are Legacy users that do this in a completely different way. They put the full physical address in the location field. This is non standard for the location field but there are some reasons why you might want to do this. If you enter your addresses/locations this way they will read out very differently in reports. I highly recommend that you do it both ways in a test file to see which way is a better fit for you. You will need to play with the Report Options quite a bit with both methods to see all of the different ways that Legacy can format your information. If you do enter addresses in the location field, when you are on the Master Location List (View > Master Lists > Location) you will want to sort from Right to Left instead of Left to Right (the default) so that your locations will sort the way you need them to. I personally like to sort this way even though I don't put addresses in the location field. Be aware that if you collaborate with other researchers using non standard data entry could pose a problem. You will face this same dilemma if you are syncing to FamilySearch.

You will need to make a similar decision with some of your custom events, especially residence events. You can add an address to the address field for that event or you can add the physical address to Description field of the event. Again, the way you choose will impact how your reports will read and you really need to spend some time playing with this. Whichever way you choose the most important thing is to be consistent with your data entry. Pick one method and stick to it. 

The formatting options for events are in two places. Open the Report and then go to Report Options > Include Tab and then you will see an Event Options button over on the right. Also go to Reports Options > Format Tab and you will see the Event Narrative Format button.

In Working With Addresses Part III we will go over Repository Addresses and now they impact your Sources and the To-Do List.

 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips check out the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis, CG® is part of the Legacy Family Tree team at MyHeritage. She handles the enhancement suggestions that come in from our users as well as writing for Legacy News. You can usually find her hanging out on the Legacy User Group Facebook page answering questions and posting tips.


Tuesday's Tip - Working With Addresses Part I (Intermediate)

Tuesday's Tip - Working With Addresses Part I (Intermediate)

Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

Working With Addresses Part I (Intermediate)

Before we get started with this 3 part series on entering addresses in Legacy, you need to know where to access all of the addresses you enter. Go to View > Master Lists > Address Lists and you will see the three categories of addresses.

Master Address Lists 1
(click image to enlarge)

 

Once you choose a category and go to the main screen you can change to another list or you can view all of the lists at one time.

Master Address Lists 2
(click image to enlarge)

 

There are a lot of options on the Master Address List screen for you to play with. I will let you explore those on your own.

There are several places to add addresses in Legacy and we will cover them all but in this first article I want to focus on the Individual Address (Mailing Address). This address is the one used in the Address Labels Report and the Name Tags Report. Address labels are normally used for living people (mass mailings) while Name Tags can be used for living people (name tags for a reunion) or deceased persons (labels for file folders). These addresses are also used as a simple address book to keep up with all of your researcher friends and cousin contacts. 

The address icon looks like a little house with a telephone next to it:

Address icon
(click image to enlarge)

 

This is what you will see when you click on the icon for the first time. The person's name will be filled in First Last for the name of record and then for sorting purposes on the Master Address List it will be Last, First.

Address defaults
(click image to enlarge)

 

And here is what it looks like after I have edited it.

Address filled in
(click image to enlarge)

There are a few things I want you to notice. Decaf is married. I want his mailing labels to print with his wife on the same label so I have changed it to Decaf and Milk Coffee. I could have put Mr. and Mrs. Decaf Coffee. How you do this is totally up to you. Mailing Labels are more important to me than Name Tags but if Name Tags are more important to you, you might want to keep it with a single name. If so you will need to add an address for the wife too. You can use the Repeat button to fill out the address fields faster or you can select the address from the Address List, edit it, and save as a new address.

For the Sort String I have added his wife's name but you don't have to. You do want to keep it last name first so that when you are looking at the Master Address List it will sort properly. If you have chosen to do the addresses singly then this won't be a problem for you. If you have chosen to put married couples on a single address you will need to go back and make some adjustments if the person divorces, remarries, or they become a widow(er). 

Notice that I have checked the boxes for Newsletter and Christmas. If I send a family newsletter out to my relatives I can print the labels easily using this "tag." The same goes with sending out Christmas cards. You will see that you have a separate "Tag" down below and you can use that for any other group of people you want to create. You will see the option to limit to these tags on the reports.

You can see that there are many other things you can add; media, notes, phone number, web URL, etc.  I will let you explore those options on your own.

Now that I have finished editing, the icon is colored in showing that I have entered an address for this person.

Colored icon
(click image to enlarge)

 

You can go to Reports > Other Reports to access both the Address Labels and the Name Tags Reports. They both have many formatting options so you will need to spend some time playing with them. You also have the option of printing a person's mailing address in some of the other reports as well. We will talk about that more in Part II of this series.

Working with Addresses Part II will cover event addresses to include two different ways to enter them. Part III will cover repository addresses and how they relate to your Sources and To-Do List.

 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips check out the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis, CG® is part of the Legacy Family Tree team at MyHeritage. She handles the enhancement suggestions that come in from our users as well as writing for Legacy News. You can usually find her hanging out on the Legacy User Group Facebook page answering questions and posting tips.


Tuesday's Tip - The Relationship Calculator (Beginner)

 TT - The Relationship Calculator

Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

The Relationship Calculator (Beginner) 

In the previous Ahnentafel Numbers article I mentioned the Relationship Calculator and how it can give you the exact relationship path between two people. This is one of my favorite tools in Legacy because it is not only useful, it is fun.

Before you get started, make sure you go to Tools > Set Relationships and set the relationship to yourself.  This will give you a bit of an advantage when you then go to Tools > Relationship to use the calculator.  If you set the relationships first Legacy will automatically put you on the left side of the screen and whoever is highlighted in any of the Views (Family, Pedigree, etc.) on the right side saving you time with having to manually select the two people you want to calculate.

Set Relationship
(click image to enlarge)

 

I have set the relationships to myself and I have navigated to one of my favorite relatives, Keziah Grantham, in the Family View.  Since I have set the relationships you will see Keziah's relationship to me above her name but this is only the beginning. The Relationship Calculator will give you even more information.

Family View
(click image to enlarge)

 

Now I go to Tools > Relationship.  Notice that Legacy automatically put me on the left and Keziah on the right. You can also manually select the left and right persons by using the Select Left/Right Person buttons.

My match to Keziah
(click image to enlarge)

You can see that Keziah is my first cousin, thrice removed. Our common ancestor is Daniel Grantham Sr. and his wife Sarah Slade. On the left you can see my path up to Daniel and Sarah and you can see Keziah's path to them on the right.

Here is what you will see if you are related to someone in more than one way. To see the paths for each match you will click the matches one at a time.

Multiple matches
(click image to enlarge)

 

Here is what you will see if you are related in some convoluted way by marriage but not by blood (if you have non-blood relationship set to calculate).

Non-blood relationship
(click image to enlarge)

 

And here is what you will see if the person you are calculating to is in a younger generation than you are. There will be an asterisk next to the relationship.

Younger generations
(click image to enlarge)

 

We need to talk about the settings a bit.  The default is 999 blood relationships and 10 non blood.

Default settings
(click image to enlarge)

 

I don't know of any two people that are related to each other 999 different ways but you never know. Leaving this at the default will be fine for most users, however, if you have a very large file (in the hundreds of thousands), and/or you have a very convoluted file (a lot of pedigree collapse that you see in royal lines or very isolated communities) then you will want to knock this number way down so that Legacy doesn't have to do as many calculations. You can easily put this at 5 and be fine. If you aren't interested in the non-blood relationships then you can just put this at 0.

Ah but we are now just getting to the best part.  You can print really cool charts from here. You can read how HERE. In that article I am focusing on how you can use the Relationship Chart with your DNA matches but you can send these to any distant relative that you make contact with to show them just how the two of you are related. It makes a very nice presentation.

Actually seeing the path to your common ancestor will tell you more than just knowing that you are 4th cousins, twice removed.

 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips check out the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

 

Michele Simmons Lewis, CG® is part of the Legacy Family Tree team at MyHeritage. She handles the enhancement suggestions that come in from our users as well as writing for Legacy News. You can usually find her hanging out on the Legacy User Group Facebook page answering questions and posting tips.

 


Two New Featurettes

NameTags

Every so often the developers will sneak a little something in an update. They have been rather generous lately. In A Surprise Easter Egg I told you about one such feature. It got its own article because it was a fairly big feature. I have a couple more I want to tell you about that are a tad smaller but still very cool. They aren't quite big enough to be features so they are featurettes. 

If you go to Reports > Other Reports > Name Tags you will now see that there are options to include Only Living Individuals, Only Dead Individuals, or Living or Dead. Before it was all or nothing. Why is this important? You can restrict it to living individuals for things like name tags for reunions or you can restrict it to dead individuals (or both) if you are wanting to make labels for file folders. The Name Tags report just became more useful.

If you go to View > Master Lists > Surname, highlight a surname, and then click Show List over on the right, you now get a dialog box asking you if you want to Exclude Married Names and/or Exclude AKAs. This is something that will help our One Name Study people tremendously. You can now restrict the list to just those persons born with that surname.

Normally updates are for bug fixes and upgrades are for new features but every so often something slips in.

Michele Simmons Lewis, CG® is part of the Legacy Family Tree team at MyHeritage. She handles the enhancement suggestions that come in from our users as well as writing for Legacy News. You can usually find her hanging out on the Legacy User Group Facebook page answering questions and posting tips.