Genealogy 101, Part 2: Using Compiled Sources - free webinar by Peggy Lauritzen now online for limited time

2015-05-06-blog

The recording of today's educational, entertaining, and inspiring webinar, "Genealogy 101, Part 2 of 3: Using Compiled Sources" by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen PLUS the after-webinar party is now available to view for free at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com for a limited time. Lots of great comments:

  • This was one of those Wow webinars. I have doing research for over 15 years and teach a Beginner's Class each year in my local genealogy society. I learned some new things! Thanks Peggy and Geoff.
  • Peggy is great, fun, enthusiastic, and totally loves what she is doing. I could learn more from her just having a conversation. She drops little tidbits of information very easily and smoothly. Great teacher!! Great genealogist, researcher, and lecturer!! Keep her coming back for more webinars!!!
  • I have never laughed so hard. Your spirits had to lift listening to Peggy. Excellent webinar.

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 51 minute recording of "Genealogy 101, Part 2 of 3: Using Compiled Sources" PLUS the after-webinar party is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership.

Coupon code

Use webinar coupon code - beginner2 - for 10% off anything at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com or www.LegacyFamilyTreeStore.com, valid through Monday, May 11, 2015.

CoverartLegacy Family Tree - Unlocked! 19.95

Not only will you learn how to use Legacy, but you will learn how to use it in the context of real genealogical research situations. This book is based on the more-popular-than-he-ever-dreamed-of “Watch Geoff Live” webinar series, meaning, it was written live and unscripted. Geoff explained, “As I researched my ancestor, George Fieldsted, I wrote down every thought, decision and step-by-step procedure as I went. I included examples and screenshots of how I added:
  • Death certificates
  • Cemetery records
  • Obituaries
  • Marriage records
  • Census records
  • and Land records 
...to Legacy Family Tree. The instructions can serve as a template to guide genealogists and Legacy users through their own research and use of Legacy.”
 

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 234 classes, 342 hours of genealogy education)
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  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
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  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
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Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year (that's about the cost of 5 webinar CDs)
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Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • After You're Gone - Future-Proofing Your Genealogy Research by Thomas MacEntee (bonus webinar for annual/monthly webinar subscribers only). May 8.
  • GenealogyBank - The Power of Finding Our Ancestor's Stories by Tom Kemp. May 13.
  • Martha Benshura - Enemy Alien by Judy Russell. May 20.
  • Migration Patterns East of the Mississippi Prior to 1860 by Mary Hill. May 27.
  • Genealogy 101, a 3-Session Course in Beginning Genealogy - Part 3 by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen. June 3.
  • Tips for Planning a Successful Seminar by Jana Sloan Broglin. June 10.
  • 10 Tips for Using Legacy with Specialized Studies by Tessa Keough. June 12.
  • The Secret Lives of Women - Researching Female Ancestors Using the Sources They Left Behind by Gena Philibert-Ortega. July 1.
  • Pinning Your Family History by Thomas MacEntee. July 8.
  • Making a Federal Case Out of It by Judy Russell (bonus webinar for annual/monthly webinar subscribers only). July 10.
  • Researching with Karen! by Karen Clifford. July 15.
  • Have Swedish Roots and Don't Know How to Get Started? by Kathy Meade. July 22.
  • Storyboard Your Family History by Lisa Alzo. July 29.
  • Mending Broken Ties: Reconstructing Family Trees Sawed by Slavery by Melvin J. Collier. July 31.
  • What's in a Name? Trouble! by Ron Arons. August 5.
  • Power Platting - Technology Tools to Create Pictures from Property Descriptions by Chris Staats. August 12.
  • Discovering Your Kentucky Ancestors by Mark Lowe. August 19.
  • Digital Family Reunions by Devin Ashby. August 21.
  • German Names and Naming Patterns by Jim Beidler. August 26.
  • Break Down Brick Walls in Eastern European Research - Tips, Tools and Tricks by Lisa Alzo. September 2.
  • Research Your Swedish Ancestors in Living Color Using ArkivDigital Online by Kathy Meade. September 9.
  • Technology and Techniques for Differentiating Two People with the Same Name by Geoff Rasmussen. September 11.
  • Researching Your Dutch Ancestors by Yvette Hoitink. September 16.
  • Researching Your Ancestors in England and Wales by Kirsty Gray. September 23.
  • Maps Tell Some of the Story for the African-Ancestored Genealogist by Angela Walton-Raji. September 25.
  • Using Periodicals to Find Your Ancestors by Gena Philibert-Ortega. September 30.
  • Wearables and Genealogy - Wacky and Wild or Worth the Wait by Thomas MacEntee. October 7.
  • Colonial Immigration - The English Pioneers of Early America by Beth Foulk. October 14.
  • Billions of Records, Billions of Stories by Devin Ashby. October 16.
  • What Happened to the State of Frankland - Using Tennessee's Pre-Statehood Records by Mark Lowe. October 21.
  • Complex Evidence - What is It? How Does it Work? And Why Does it Matter? by Warren Bittner. October 28.
  • Researching with Karen! by Karen Clifford. November 4.
  • Organizing Your Genetic Genealogy by Diahan Southard. November 11.
  • Bringing it All Together and Leaving a Permanent Record by Tom Kemp. November 13.
  • Mapping Madness by Ron Arons. November 18.
  • Stories in Stone - Cemetery Research by Gail Blankenau. December 2.
  • Thinking about Becoming an Accredited Genealogist? by Apryl Cox and Kelly Summers. December 9.
  • Pointing Fingers at Ancestors' Siblings - Breaking Down Brick Walls with Collateral Research by Marian Pierre-Louis. December 16.

Click here to register. Or click here register for multiple webinars at the same time.

Print the 2015 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


FamilySearch Records Update: More than 4.9 Indexed Records and Images for Canada, the Czech Republic, Indonesia, New Zealand, Peru, the Philippines, and the United States

FamilySearch has added to its collections more than 4.9 million indexed records and images for Canada, the Czech Republic, Indonesia, New Zealand, Peru, the Philippines, and the United States. Notable collection updates include 636,309 images from the New York, County Marriages, 1847–1848; 1908–1936 collection; 602,220 images from the Indonesia, Jawa Tengah, Pemalang, District Court Records, 1961–2013 collection; and 476,396 indexed records and 273,544 images from the New Zealand, Archives New Zealand, Probate Records, 1843–1998 collection. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

CollectionIndexed RecordsDigital ImagesComments
Canada, Newfoundland Census, 1935 296,231 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection.
Canada, Newfoundland Census, 1945 328,362 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection.
Canada, Nova Scotia Deaths, 1890–1955 336,983 251,097 New indexed records and images collection.
Canada, Nova Scotia Deaths, 1956–1957 11,869 12,185 New indexed records and images collection.
Czech Republic Censuses, 1800–1945 0 37,741 Added images to an existing collection.
Indonesia, Jawa Tengah, Ciamis District Court Records, 1950–2014 0 337,963 New browsable image collection.
Indonesia, Jawa Tengah, Kudus, District Court Naturalization Records, 1958–2013 0 173,815 Added images to an existing collection.
Indonesia, Jawa Tengah, Pekalongan District Court Records, 1977–2003 0 104,422 New browsable image collection.
Indonesia, Jawa Tengah, Pemalang, District Court Records, 1961–2013 0 602,220 New browsable image collection.
Indonesia, Jawa Tengah, Ungaran, District Court Naturalization Records, 1975–2014 0 390,070 New browsable image collection.
New Zealand, Archives New Zealand, Probate Records, 1843–1998 476,396 273,544 Added indexed records and images to an existing collection.
Peru, Amazonas, Civil Registration, 1939–1998 0 22,055 Added images to an existing collection.
Philippines, Biliran, Diocese of Naval Parish Registers, 1818–1978 0 28,118 New browsable image collection.
US, Arizona, County Marriages, 1871–1964 0 354,145 New browsable image collection.
US, Georgia, Fulton County Records from the Atlanta History Center, 1827–1955 0 4,014 Added images to an existing collection.
US, Iowa, Grand Army of the Republic Membership Records, 1861–1865 0 176,612 New browsable image collection.
US, New Hampshire, Birth Certificates, 1901–1909 0 105,732 New browsable image collection.
New York, County Marriages, 1847–1848; 1908–1936 0 636,309 Added images to an existing collection.

BONUS Live Webinar (for subscribers) this Friday with Thomas MacEntee - After You're Gone: Future-Proofing Your Genealogy Research

ThomasHave you ever considered what will happen to your years of genealogy research once you’re gone? Learn how to ensure that your hard work carries on. Through a combination of planning, common sense, and new technologies, we’ll review how to create an action plan for preserving your genealogy research.

Join us this Friday, May 8, 2015 at 2pm Eastern U.S. for our first-ever subscribers-only live webinar. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion. Not yet a subscriber? Join here.

Download the syllabus

In preparation for the webinar, download the supplemental syllabus materials here. The syllabus is available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers. Log in here or subscribe here.

Registerbut

Or register for multiple webinars at once by clicking here.

Not sure if you already registered?

On the Upcoming Webinars tab, login to view the webinars you are already signed up for (available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers).

Test Your Webinar Connection

To ensure that your webinar connection is ready to go, click here.

Can't make it to the live event?

No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

Presenter-9590What happens when a “tech guy” with a love for history gets laid off during The Great Recession of 2008? You get Thomas MacEntee, a genealogy professional who’s also a blogger, educator, author, social media connector, online community builder and more. Thomas was laid off after a 25-year career in the information technology field, so he started his own genealogy-related business called High Definition Genealogy. He also created an online community of over 3,000 family history bloggers known as GeneaBloggers. His most recent endeavor, Hack Genealogy, is an attempt to “re-purpose today’s technology for tomorrow’s genealogy.” Thomas describes himself as a lifelong learner with a background in a multitude of topics who has finally figured out what he does best: teach, inspire, instigate, and serve as a curator and go-to-guy for concept nurturing and inspiration. Thomas is a big believer in success, and that we all succeed when we help each other find success.

Click here to view Thomas' webinars in the archives.

Add it to your Google Calendar

With our Google Calendar button, you will never forget our upcoming webinars. Simply click the button to add it to your calendar. You can then optionally embed the webinar events (and even turn them on and off) into your own personal calendar. If you have already added the calendar, you do not have to do it again - the new webinar events will automatically appear.

Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Friday, May 8, 2015 at:

  • 2pm Eastern (U.S.)
  • 1pm Central
  • 12pm Mountain
  • 11am Pacific

Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Login at http://familytreewebinars.com/login.php, then register.
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email both 1 day and 1 hour prior to the live webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone.

We look forward to seeing you all there!


Register for Webinar Wednesday - Genealogy 101 part 2: Using Compiled Sources by Peggy Lauritzen

Logowhite

We all have an aunt or a grandmother that has a shoebox full of obituaries, funeral cards, or other old documents that sit on a dresser or closet shelf. Or, perhaps we are that person with the shoebox. These beginning genealogy sessions will show how to take what you know and what you have access to, and teach the steps involved in getting it organized and compiled into a useful genealogy that can benefit future generations. 

Session 2 - Using Compiled Sources. There are many opportunities to view what has been researched before. Some of those collections include compiled genealogies and heritage books, and online compilations. We will look at some ways to discover if the previous research is credible and can aid in our own family history research.

Join us for the live webinar Wednesday, May 6, 2015 at 2pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion.

Registerbut

Or register for multiple webinars at once by clicking here.

Not sure if you already registered?

On the Upcoming Webinars tab, login to view the webinars you are already signed up for (available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers).

Download the syllabus

In preparation for the webinar, download the supplemental syllabus materials here. The syllabus is available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers. Log in here or subscribe here.

Test Your Webinar Connection

To ensure that your webinar connection is ready to go, click here.

Can't make it to the live event?

No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

Lauritzenp-100Peggy Clemens Lauritzen, AG, was involved in genealogy before she was even born. The daughter of avid genealogists, she was spending time in courthouses and cemeteries while other children were playing on swings and going to the beach. The love of her family’s history has never left her. With her experience as a former Family History Director, she is a frequent speaker at genealogical societies, workshops, seminars, and webinars where she loves bringing genealogy to life. Some of those would include The Ohio Genealogical Society, The Ohio State University, Brigham Young University, and many other state and local genealogy societies. She has recently completed several Legacy QuickGuides on Appalachia, which are also available on www.legacyfamilytree.com and www.amazon.com.

View Peggy's other webinars here.

Add it to your Google Calendar

With our Google Calendar button, you will never forget our upcoming webinars. Simply click the button to add it to your calendar. You can then optionally embed the webinar events (and even turn them on and off) into your own personal calendar. If you have already added the calendar, you do not have to do it again - the new webinar events will automatically appear.

Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Wednesday, May 6, 2015 at:

  • 2pm Eastern (U.S.)
  • 1pm Central
  • 12pm Mountain
  • 11am Pacific

Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email both 1 day and 1 hour prior to the live webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone.

We look forward to seeing you all there!


Using Legacy for a Surname Project - brand new BONUS webinar by Geoff Rasmussen for subscribers

2015-04-25-blog

Get a quick intro to using Legacy Family Tree and learn how it can be used for a surname project. Specifically, Geoff shows how he indexed and published a collection of records with the Legacy software. Learn tips and tricks about using Legacy along the way. This class was privately presented to The Surname Society via a live Hangout-on-Air and is republished here, for webinar subscribers, with the society's permission.

How to view:

If you are an annual or monthly webinar subscriber, this webinar's recording is now available in the Webinar Library. Just head over to the library, login, and enjoy!

Click here to watch the webinar.

If you are not yet a webinar subscriber...when you join as an annual or monthly subscriber you, too, will have access to these bonus members-only webinars. This is the eleventh we've added since January. Take a look at all of these benefits:

  • Unlimited access to the entire Webinar Library (currently 233 classes to choose from)
  • Access to the instructors' handouts (currently 967 pages)
  • Access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • Chance for a bonus subscribers-only door prize during each live webinar
  • 5% off anything in the FamilyTreeWebinars.com store
  • See which live webinars you have registered for

For more information, or to subscribe, click here.

About the presenter

Presenter-6679Geoffrey D. Rasmussen is the father of four budding genealogists. He graduated with a degree in Genealogy and Family History from Brigham Young University and has served as director and vice-president of the Utah Genealogical Association. He is a dynamic genealogy speaker on all forms of genealogy technology, and as host of the Legacy Family Tree webinar series, has spoken virtually to nearly 100 different countries. He has authored books, videos, articles, and websites, and develops the Legacy Family Tree software program. On a personal note, Geoff enjoys playing the piano, organ, cello, basketball and bowling. His favorite places are cemeteries, the ocean, and hanging out with other genealogists. He met and proposed to his wife in a Family History Center.

He is the author of the recently-released, Kindred Voices: Listening for our Ancestors, and the popular books Legacy Family Tree, Unlocked! and Digital Imaging Essentials.

Click here for all of Geoff's webinars.


New England Town Records Demystified

by Marian Pierre-Louis

  TownRecord-Medway1811-Ancestry-crop

Medway, Massachusetts Town Record book, 1811. From Ancestry.com's Holbrook Collection (Medway Town Records, image 352).

Last week I wrote about how to Navigate Local Town Hall Research, specifically vital records such as birth records. Before leaving the topic I'd like to explore the different types of  New England Town Hall records.

Often when people think of Town Hall records they either think of vital records (births, marriages and deaths) or they conjure up the image of the old time chronological town records where all the information was kept in one book.

The truth is New England town records are more complicated than that. There are four  important concepts you need to understand. First, there is no one set type of record book. In fact, there are many. Second, the record books and how information is recorded will be different depending on the time period. Third, all those original record books might not be "original." Last, not all town record books are currently found in the town hall.

Original town record books

Let's tackle the issue of original town record books first. New England records started to be recorded in some part of New England in the 1620s. That's nearly 400 years ago. Over the course of that time books have gotten damaged, gone missing or been exposed to flood or fire. As a result, over the years some Town Record records have been copied into new books. In some case, this is to preserve older copies and in other cases it was to make information more accessible.

The key thing to check for is the handwriting of the information. Is chronological information all in the same handwriting with the same color or "weight" (heavy or light) of the pen? True original records should have been written as the events happened and therefore each entry should look slightly different. Is there a note at the front of the book explaining provenance? Some town clerks will make a note at the front of the book as to when the records were copied and by whom.

There  is nothing wrong with using town record books that are not originals. They may still be very old! You simply need to be aware that any derivative copy may have introduced errors. So be on the alert if anything looks incorrect. If it does, scan the page (or several pages) from top to bottom and see if you can discover where the town clerk went amiss.

Types of Record Books

There are and were many different types of Town Hall record books. The oldest books were often chronological records containing every bit of town record information from votes to taxes to births, marriages and deaths and even animal markings. The details were written as they happened but be aware that no blank space was spared. Some information will be written in the margins and if a book ran out of space, a Town Clerk might go back to find an empty spot to cram in some later information. Therefore be on the lookout for information tucked away in unusual spots. These town record books are the least likely to be digitized (though they are microfilmed) or indexed.

As the years went by and town government became more organized, individual record books were introduced. You will find separate books for town business and vital records. You many also find books for marriage intentions completely separate from recorded marriages.

Some books you may never have heard of such as warning out books (where non-residents were warned against attempting to settle in town) and strangers taken in books (where residents had to notify the town if a non-resident was staying with them for a longer period of time).

There were also poor records, tax books and accounts books listing all the financial transactions of the town. The accounts books are a particular treasure because they might make reference to payment for grave diggers or coffin makers for deaths that otherwise went unrecorded.

Some town halls, particularly in states like Connecticut, Vermont and Rhode Island, where information is recorded at the town level rather than the county level also have deeds and probate records.

How information is recorded

You are most likely familiar with census records. You know that the oldest census records hold the least amount of information and as you come forward in time, you find greater details. Town record books are like that as well. There are three basic types of recorded information: long form chronological text, register style and certificate style.

The earliest records were written long form with little separation by topic except perhaps by headers or a note in the margin. In the 1800s register style took over. Here you find information such as births, marriages and deaths in a list with many people on one page. The information is standardized into  columns. As we head into the 20th century, life event information is recorded certificate style in individual certificates such as a modern birth or death certificates.

Finding Town Records Books

You would think that all town record books are located in the local town hall but that is not the case! Some record books were moved so that they could be better protected or preserved. Other books were moved, such as account books, because they were no longer deemed critical by town clerks. You will often find these books in the care of the local historical society or the historical room of the local library. To find them, check online card catalogs when you can, call the historical society or ask the town clerk.

In other, more unusual cases, town record books might be found in the home of the local town clerk. This is a very old fashioned practice which is not the case in most places. However, some very small rural towns may not have a lot of space and therefore the books get moved to make room for modern records.

If you'd like to learn more about New England Town Records here are some further resources:

Benton, Josiah Henry. Warning Out in New England. Boston: W.B. Clarke Company, 1911.

Friend, Esther L. “Notifications and Warnings Out: Strangers Taken Into Wrentham, Massachusetts, Between 1731 and 1812.” The New England Historical and Genealogical Register Vol. 141(1987): 179-188. [This provides a good summary of "strangers" before getting into the detailed Wrentham information.]

Gutman, Robert. “Birth and Death Registration in Massachusetts. I. The Colonial Background, 1639-1800.” The Milbank Memorial Fund Quarterly Vol. 36, No.1 (Jan. 1958): 58-74

Herndon, Ruth Wallis.  Unwelcome Americans: Living on the Margin in Early New England. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2001.

Lainhart, Ann S. Digging for Genealogical Treasure in New England Town Records. Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1996.

Marian Pierre-Louis is the Social Media Marketing Manager for Legacy Family Tree. She is also the host of The Genealogy Professional podcast. Check out her webinars in the Legacy library.


The 1940 U.S. Census - brand new BONUS webinar by Michael Brophy for subscribers

2015-04-30-blog

The 1940 Census was released to the public on April 2, 2012. Nine out of every ten Americans has a relative in the census. First enjoy a brief history of the U.S. census and learn of the differences in the 1790-1840, 1850-1870, and 1880-1930 census records. Then, learn about the social history - what was going on at the time of this census, and get an in-depth look into the information you can find. Finally, learn what to do if you cannot locate your ancestor in the indexes.

How to view:

If you are an annual or monthly webinar subscriber, this webinar's recording is now available in the Webinar Library. Just head over to the library, login, and enjoy! Two pages of supplemental syllabus materials also accompany this webinar.

Click here to watch the webinar.

If you are not yet a webinar subscriber...when you join as an annual or monthly subscriber you, too, will have access to these bonus members-only webinars. This is the twelfth we've added since January. Take a look at all of these benefits:

  • Unlimited access to the entire Webinar Library (currently 233 classes to choose from)
  • Access to the instructors' handouts (currently 967 pages)
  • Access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • Chance for a bonus subscribers-only door prize during each live webinar
  • 5% off anything in the FamilyTreeWebinars.com store
  • See which live webinars you have registered for

For more information, or to subscribe, click here.

About the presenter

Presenter-1426606372Michael Brophy is a nationally known, professional genealogical researcher, heir search specialist, and lecturer from the Boston area. He has served as Program Director and Publicity Director for the Massachusetts Genealogical Council. He was the first Treasurer of the New England Association of Professional Genealogists. Mike earned an MBA degree from Suffolk University and a BBA from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Mike was featured on the Irish TV series Dead Money, a genealogy TV show about heir searchers. In 2010, Mr. Brophy was hired to conduct research for the NBC television program Who Do You Think You Are?, on an episode dedicated to the family history of actress Gwyneth Paltrow. He has lectured on a wide variety of genealogy subjects at the National Genealogy Society’s Annual Conference in 2014, 2012 and 2011. He specializes in New England and Irish genealogy subjects. His genealogy education includes seven certificates from the Institute of Genealogy and Historic Research (IGHR) and certificates in Private Investigation and Advanced Forensic Genealogy from Boston University.

Click here for all of Michael's webinars.


Using Legacy with Specialized Studies - Legacy is for more than your family history - free webinar by Tessa Keough now online for limited time

2015-04-29-blog

The recording of today's jam-packed webinar, "Using Legacy with Specialized Studies - Legacy is for more than your family history," by Tessa Keough is now available to view for free at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com for a limited time. Lots of great comments:

  • As a person with ADD, who is "organizationally - challenged" SOOOOO many wonderful ideas!! I even stopped mid-webinar to call a friend to tell her how wonderful this webinar is for EVERYone -- not just Legacy users!! FANTASTIC tips !!!  Cannot wait to start implementing !!! So motivating !!! THANKS !!!!
  • Lots of good information. A different way to look at genealogy altogether. :) And her enthusiasm is infectious!!
  • I am really glad I didn't miss this one. My mind is swimming with ideas for projects! Am thinking how some special projects could enhance expressing what I've uncovered in my research. What fun! Thanks for a great webinar, looking forward to the next time Tessa is here. 

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 30 minute recording of "Using Legacy with Specialized Studies - Legacy is for more than your family history"is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership.

Coupon code

Use webinar coupon code - tessa - for 10% off anything at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com or www.LegacyFamilyTreeStore.com, valid through Monday, May 4, 2015.

CoverartLegacy Family Tree - Unlocked! 19.95

Not only will you learn how to use Legacy, but you will learn how to use it in the context of real genealogical research situations. This book is based on the more-popular-than-he-ever-dreamed-of “Watch Geoff Live” webinar series, meaning, it was written live and unscripted. Geoff explained, “As I researched my ancestor, George Fieldsted, I wrote down every thought, decision and step-by-step procedure as I went. I included examples and screenshots of how I added:
  • Death certificates
  • Cemetery records
  • Obituaries
  • Marriage records
  • Census records
  • and Land records 
...to Legacy Family Tree. The instructions can serve as a template to guide genealogists and Legacy users through their own research and use of Legacy.”
 

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 232 classes, 339 hours of genealogy education)
  • On-demand access to the instructor handouts (now 965 pages)
  • On-demand access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Chance for a members-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
  • Ability to view which webinars you are registered for

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year (that's about the cost of 5 webinar CDs)
  • Monthly membership: $9.95/month

Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • Genealogy 101, a 3-Session Course in Beginning Genealogy - Part 2 by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen. May 6.
  • After You're Gone - Future-Proofing Your Genealogy Research by Thomas MacEntee (bonus webinar for annual/monthly webinar subscribers only). May 8.
  • GenealogyBank - The Power of Finding Our Ancestor's Stories by Tom Kemp. May 13.
  • Martha Benshura - Enemy Alien by Judy Russell. May 20.
  • Migration Patterns East of the Mississippi Prior to 1860 by Mary Hill. May 27.
  • Genealogy 101, a 3-Session Course in Beginning Genealogy - Part 3 by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen. June 3.
  • Tips for Planning a Successful Seminar by Jana Sloan Broglin. June 10.
  • 10 Tips for Using Legacy with Specialized Studies by Tessa Keough. June 12.
  • The Secret Lives of Women - Researching Female Ancestors Using the Sources They Left Behind by Gena Philibert-Ortega. July 1.
  • Pinning Your Family History by Thomas MacEntee. July 8.
  • Making a Federal Case Out of It by Judy Russell (bonus webinar for annual/monthly webinar subscribers only). July 10.
  • Researching with Karen! by Karen Clifford. July 15.
  • Have Swedish Roots and Don't Know How to Get Started? by Kathy Meade. July 22.
  • Storyboard Your Family History by Lisa Alzo. July 29.
  • Mending Broken Ties: Reconstructing Family Trees Sawed by Slavery by Melvin J. Collier. July 31.
  • What's in a Name? Trouble! by Ron Arons. August 5.
  • Power Platting - Technology Tools to Create Pictures from Property Descriptions by Chris Staats. August 12.
  • Discovering Your Kentucky Ancestors by Mark Lowe. August 19.
  • Digital Family Reunions by Devin Ashby. August 21.
  • German Names and Naming Patterns by Jim Beidler. August 26.
  • Break Down Brick Walls in Eastern European Research - Tips, Tools and Tricks by Lisa Alzo. September 2.
  • Research Your Swedish Ancestors in Living Color Using ArkivDigital Online by Kathy Meade. September 9.
  • Technology and Techniques for Differentiating Two People with the Same Name by Geoff Rasmussen. September 11.
  • Researching Your Dutch Ancestors by Yvette Hoitink. September 16.
  • Researching Your Ancestors in England and Wales by Kirsty Gray. September 23.
  • Maps Tell Some of the Story for the African-Ancestored Genealogist by Angela Walton-Raji. September 25.
  • Using Periodicals to Find Your Ancestors by Gena Philibert-Ortega. September 30.
  • Wearables and Genealogy - Wacky and Wild or Worth the Wait by Thomas MacEntee. October 7.
  • Colonial Immigration - The English Pioneers of Early America by Beth Foulk. October 14.
  • Billions of Records, Billions of Stories by Devin Ashby. October 16.
  • What Happened to the State of Frankland - Using Tennessee's Pre-Statehood Records by Mark Lowe. October 21.
  • Complex Evidence - What is It? How Does it Work? And Why Does it Matter? by Warren Bittner. October 28.
  • Researching with Karen! by Karen Clifford. November 4.
  • Organizing Your Genetic Genealogy by Diahan Southard. November 11.
  • Bringing it All Together and Leaving a Permanent Record by Tom Kemp. November 13.
  • Mapping Madness by Ron Arons. November 18.
  • Stories in Stone - Cemetery Research by Gail Blankenau. December 2.
  • Thinking about Becoming an Accredited Genealogist? by Apryl Cox and Kelly Summers. December 9.
  • Pointing Fingers at Ancestors' Siblings - Breaking Down Brick Walls with Collateral Research by Marian Pierre-Louis. December 16.

Click here to register. Or click here register for multiple webinars at the same time.

Print the 2015 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


Register for Webinar Wednesday - Legacy is for more than your family history by Tessa Keough

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Specialized studies take many forms – whether it is a one-name (surname) study, a one-place (location) study, or a cemetery, church or school survey. These projects often have us “reinventing the wheel” as we try to come up with a method for entering and using our data. Why reinvent the wheel when you can use Legacy? Join Tessa Keough as she shows you how she uses Legacy for more than her family history. We will discuss some tips and suggestions for using Legacy's well-known and lesser-known features with your specialized studies and projects. Whether you are simply thinking about a project, have just gotten started, or are taking a second look at your approach and software, there will be something for everyone.

Join us for the live webinar Wednesday, April 29, 2015 at 2pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion.

Registerbut

Or register for multiple webinars at once by clicking here.

Not sure if you already registered?

On the Upcoming Webinars tab, login to view the webinars you are already signed up for (available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers).

Download the syllabus

In preparation for the webinar, download the supplemental syllabus materials here. The syllabus is available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers. Log in here or subscribe here.

Test Your Webinar Connection

To ensure that your webinar connection is ready to go, click here.

Can't make it to the live event?

No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

Keought-100Tessa Keough is a genealogist in transition (read – this is not her day job but she wishes it was!). She takes advantage of 21st century technology to work on her own family history as well as engage in specialized projects. These projects include a one-place study of her grandfather’s native community of Plate Cove East, Newfoundland, and a one-name study of her Keough surname.

Seeing a need for an online users’ group for her favorite genealogy software, Tessa set up the Legacy Virtual Users’ Group Community on Google+. With three of her fellow genealogists, she co-hosts monthly hangouts-on-air presentations, provides tips, and moderates the member posts at the LVUG Community which boasts more than 900 members. For the past two years Tessa has served as the USA West Regional Representative for the Guild of One-Name Studies. In April 2014 she took on the post of USA National Representative for the Guild and serves as the Guild’s delegate member to the Federated Genealogical Society (FGS). She moderates the Guild’s Google+ Community and co-hosts the Guild’s North American monthly hangouts-on-air. Tessa blogs on her personal blogs, is a contributing blogger to Worldwide Genealogy, and is part of the 5-member interview team for the May I Introduce To You feature at Geneabloggers. Tessa is doing her best to spread the word about surname and location studies as a fascinating and fun way to connect to your larger family history story, your extended relatives, and your fellow genealogists.

In case you did not notice, Tessa is a huge fan of Google+ and YouTube and an even bigger fan of giving back to the genealogy and family history community. Her volunteer efforts landed her on Lisa Louise Cooke’s Social Media Mavericks: 40 to follow list in Family Tree Magazine’s March/April 2014 edition for TessaWatch (her YouTube channel with 120 short and not-so-short video tutorials).

View Tessa's other webinars here.

Add it to your Google Calendar

With our Google Calendar button, you will never forget our upcoming webinars. Simply click the button to add it to your calendar. You can then optionally embed the webinar events (and even turn them on and off) into your own personal calendar. If you have already added the calendar, you do not have to do it again - the new webinar events will automatically appear.

Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Wednesday, April 29, 2015 at:

  • 2pm Eastern (U.S.)
  • 1pm Central
  • 12pm Mountain
  • 11am Pacific

Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email both 1 day and 1 hour prior to the live webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone.

We look forward to seeing you all there!