How can blogging help your family history?

  Blogging

 

I entered the blogging world well before it had entered the mainstream lexicon. Back then, I only had a vague idea of what blogs were and certainly no idea as to their usefulness as a tool in our  social network. For me, it was a way to demonstrate to myself and my teachers, what I had done as a product. As a senior in high school, we were required to complete a year-long independent project and I set out to learn about my family history and the world of genealogy. At the same time, I learned about the world of blogging and would like to offer some reasons blogging about your family history can enhance your overall experience in genealogy, no matter what level of involvement in the field you decide to take.

Blogging allows you to tell your story in your way 

I’m always impressed by the diversity of blogs I encounter and can truly say that having a blog can make family history a lot more fun. It allows you to be creative and to bring the stories of your ancestors to life. Often times, genealogy blogs are focused around one’s family tree or themes like technology or study projects related to a historical community. One of my favorite parts of posting is to add pictures of ancestors, historical buildings, and more as an aid for blogging about events in my ancestor’s lives or to capture my reflections on experiences like research trips.   

Bring your own perspective to the table

I wouldn’t say it’s permissible to be opinionated to the point of being offensive, but it is valuable, if not equally important to  share how you perceive the events and decisions of your ancestors.  After finding a clue, you might realize that it relates to something you heard from relative long ago. Research skills and knowledge are essential, but equally important is allowing our minds to open up and think about the research in a new, perhaps more person way.

World map showing breakdown of visitors to my blog by country.  "Stats for 2016 < Travelogues of a Genealogist," Wordpress.com. Accessed 20 Jan 2016.
World map showing breakdown of visitors to my blog by country. "Stats for 2016 < Travelogues of a Genealogist," Wordpress.com. Accessed 20 Jan 2016.

 

Having a web presence brings in great connections, distant cousins, and more

It’s always a treat when a relative you never knew before writes to you with new genealogical evidence to corroborate with yours. That’s happened quite a few times over the years because having my blog allowed them to connect with me. I’ve received e-mails from cousins living California to Galway, Ireland and more. By keeping a blog about certain lines of your family that you are pursuing, there is likely someone out there researching the same line. Bloggers can tag their posts with different subjects such as locations and surnames which can help blogs reach the desired audience based on their content Admittedly, I do feel bad when individuals researching Fletcher e-mail me. My connection to Fletcher resulted in a paternal name change by my grandfather, so I have nothing to offer.

Better your research process and your skills

You can use your blog to document your research process. In my own blog, I devote posts to clues or several clues found simultaneously in a case study. I then talk about the sources, their origin and purpose, and then I talk about how does the source corroborate with other evidence I have previously collected. As I blog consistently about my ancestors, I simultaneously am creating the backbone of content like articles and presentations.   

Turn your blog into a book; save the stories for future generations

I knew that after seven years of posting on my genealogy blog, I’d be devastated to lose all that information. All blog hosts offer a backup service, but you might also consider having your blog turned into a book. The process is quite simple if you convert your blog into a pdf. Blog2print.com offers this conversion for a small charge. To print the actual book, I placed my order through lulu.com for the same price. Having a print copy of my book, I have re-purposed my blog as a reference source on my bookshelf so I can utilize in ongoing case studies for my own family. It also offers a new way to share my work with other family members.

If you haven’t already started blogging about your family history, consider trying it. The most popular hosts are Blogger and WordPress, both of which are free. Blogging is very accessible and can be done at your leisure, but you find yourself posting more than you thought.  Blogs are an invaluable asset for genealogical research!

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Jake Fletcher is a genealogist and blogger. Jake has been researching and writing about genealogy since 2008 on his research blog Travelogues of a Genealogist. He currently volunteers as a research assistant at the National Archives in Waltham, Massachusetts and is Vice President of the New England Association of Professional Genealogists (NEAPG). 

 

  

 


Free Legacy Family Tree update now available (version 8.0.0.538)

We have another great new update for our Legacy Family Tree 8 users (free) for you to download. It provides:

  • 177 brand new and updated Research Guidance suggestions,
  • fixes to some minor issues you have reported to us,

So download the update to get the best Legacy ever!

See the download instructions below for step-by-step instructions on installing this update.

What's New

Research Guidance. Legacy's exclusive, built-in Research Guidance, takes a look at what you already know about an ancestor, then gives you a prioritized list of research links and suggestions - all based on when and where your ancestor lived. Beginners love the guidance; experienced researchers love the checklist as a way to not overlook potential sources. Below is the list of new and updated Research Guidance sources added in this update. Click here for an overview of using Research Guidance.

New / updated (177)

Argentina Baptisms, 1645-1930
Argentina Marriages, 1722-1911
Argentina, Buenos Aires, Catholic Church Records, 1635-1981
Argentina, Capital Federal, Catholic Church Records, 1737-1977
Argentina, Capital Federal, Census, 1855
Argentina, Catamarca, Catholic Church Records, 1724-1971
Argentina, Chaco, Catholic Church Records, 1882-1955
Argentina, Chubut, Catholic Church Records, 1884-1974
Argentina, Corrientes, Catholic Church Records, 1734-1977
Argentina, Córdoba, Catholic Church Records, 1557-1974
Argentina, Córdoba, Miscellaneous Records, 1574-1925
Argentina, Entre Ríos, Catholic Church Records, 1764-1983
Argentina, Jujuy, Catholic Church Records, 1662-1975
Argentina, La Pampa, Catholic Church Records, 1882-1976
Argentina, La Rioja, Catholic Church Records, 1714-1970
Argentina, Mendoza, Catholic Church Records, 1665-1975
Argentina, Misiones, Catholic Church Records, 1874-1975
Argentina, National Census, 1869
Argentina, National Census, 1895
Argentina, Neuquén, Catholic Church Records, 1883-1977
Argentina, Río Negro, Catholic Church Records, 1880-1977
Argentina, Salta, Catholic Church Records, 1634-1972
Argentina, San Juan, Catholic Church Records, 1655-1975
Argentina, Santa Cruz, Catholic Church Records, 1886-1964
Argentina, Santa Fe, Catholic Church Records, 1634-1975
Argentina, Santiago del Estero, Catholic Church Records, 1581-1961
Argentina, Tierra del Fuego, Catholic Church Records, 1894-1950
Argentina, Tucumán, Catholic Church Records, 1727-1955
Bolivia Baptisms, 1560-1938
Bolivia Catholic Church Records, 1566-1996
Bolivia Deaths, 1750-1920
Bolivia Marriages, 1630-1940
Brazil Baptisms, 1688-1935
Brazil Deaths, 1750-1890
Brazil Marriages, 1730-1955
Brazil, Bahia, Passenger Lists, 1855-1964
Brazil, Bahía, Catholic Church Records, 1598-2007
Brazil, Ceará, Catholic Church Records, 1725-1971
Brazil, Maranhão, Catholic Church Records, 1673-1962
Brazil, Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Cemetery Records, 1897-2012
Brazil, Minas Gerais, Catholic Church Records, 1706-1999
Brazil, Paraná, Catholic Church Records, 1704-2008
Brazil, Paraná, Civil Registration, 1852-1996
Brazil, Paraíba, Catholic Church Records, 1731-2013
Brazil, Paraíba, Civil Registration, 1879-2007
Brazil, Pará, Catholic Church Records, 1930-1976
Brazil, Pernambuco, Catholic Church Records, 1762-2002
Brazil, Pernambuco, Civil Registration, 1804-2014
Brazil, Piauí, Civil Registration, 1875-2013
Brazil, Rio Grande do Norte, Catholic Church Records, 1788-1967
Brazil, Rio Grande do Sul, Catholic Church Records, 1738-1952
Brazil, Rio Grande do Sul, Miscellaneous Records, 1748-1998
Brazil, Rio de Janeiro, Catholic Church Records, 1616-1980
Brazil, Rio de Janeiro, Civil Registration, 1829-2012
Brazil, Rio de Janeiro, Immigration Cards, 1900-1965
Brazil, Santa Catarina, Catholic Church Records, 1714-1977
Brazil, Santa Catarina, Civil Registration, 1850-1999
Brazil, Sergipe, Catholic Church Records, 1785-1994
Brazil, São Paulo, Catholic Church Records, 1640-2012
Brazil, São Paulo, Immigrant Hostelry Records, 1882-1925
Brazil, São Paulo, Immigration Cards, 1902-1980
Brazil, São Paulo, Port of Santos, Passenger and Immigrant Lists, 1960-1982
Brazil, São Paulo, São Paulo, Burial Records, 1858-1977
Chile Baptisms, 1585-1932
Chile Cemetery Records, 1821-2013
Chile Civil Registration, 1885-1903
Chile Deaths, 1700-1920
Chile Marriages, 1579-1930
Colombia Baptisms, 1630-1950
Colombia Deaths, 1770-1930
Colombia Marriages, 1750-1960
Colombia, Catholic Church Records, 1576-2014
Colombia, Military Records, 1809-1958
Colombia, Valle del Cauca, Miscellaneous Records, 1549-1955
Ecuador Baptisms, 1680-1930
Ecuador Deaths, 1800-1920
Ecuador Marriages, 1680-1930
Ecuador, Catholic Church Records, 1565-2011
Paraguay Baptisms, 1800-1930
Paraguay Marriages, 1800-1900
Paraguay Miscellaneous Records, 1509-1977
Paraguay, Asunción, Cemetery Records, 1842-2011
Paraguay, Catholic Church Records, 1754-1981
Peru Baptisms, 1556-1930
Peru Deaths, 1750-1930
Peru Marriages, 1600-1940
Peru, Amazonas, Civil Registration, 1939-1998
Peru, Arequipa, Civil Registration, 1860-1976
Peru, Cajamarca, Civil Registration, 1938-1996
Peru, Callao, Civil Registration, 1874-1996
Peru, Catholic Church Records, 1603-1992
Peru, Cusco, Civil Registration, 1889-1997
Peru, Huánuco, Civil Registration, 1889-1997
Peru, Junín, Civil Registration, 1881-2005
Peru, La Libertad, Civil Registration, 1903-1998
Peru, Lambayeque, Civil Registration, 1873-1998
Peru, Lima, Civil Registration, 1874-1996
Peru, Moquegua, Civil Registration, 1850-1996
Peru, Municipal Census, 1831-1866
Peru, Puno, Civil Registration, 1890-2005
Peru, San Martín, Civil Registration, 1850-1999
Peru, Tacna, Civil Registration, 1850-1998
Peru, Áncash, Civil Registration, 1888-2005
Uruguay, Baptisms, 1750-1900
Uruguay, Civil Registration, 1879-1930
Uruguay, Marriages, 1840-1900
Venezuela, Archdiocese of Mérida, Catholic Church Records, 1654-2013
Venezuela, Archdiocese of Valencia, Catholic Church Records, 1760, 1905-2013
Venezuela, Catholic Church Records, 1577-1995
Venezuela, Civil Registration, 1873-2003
Bahamas Births, 1850-1891
Bahamas Civil Registration, 1850-1959
Barbados Baptisms, 1739-1891
Barbados Burials, 1854-1885
Barbados Church Records, 1637-1887
Barbados Marriages, 1854-1879
Central America, Colonial Records, 1607-1902
Costa Rica Baptisms, 1700-1915
Costa Rica Civil Registration, 1860-1975
Costa Rica Deaths, 1787-1900
Costa Rica Marriages, 1750-1920
Costa Rica, Catholic Church Records, 1595-1992
Dominican Republic Baptisms, 1726-1924
Dominican Republic Births, 1801-2006
Dominican Republic Civil Registration,
Dominican Republic Deaths, 1666-1862
Dominican Republic Marriages, 1743-1929
Dominican Republic Miscellaneous Records, 1921-1980
Dominican Republic, Catholic Church Records, 1590-1955
El Salvador Baptisms, 1750-1940
El Salvador Catholic Church Records, 1655-1977
El Salvador Civil Registration, 1704-1977
El Salvador Marriages, 1810-1930
Grenada Births and Baptisms, 1866-1891
Guatemala Baptisms, 1730-1917
Guatemala Civil Registration, 1877-2008
Guatemala Deaths, 1760-1880
Guatemala Marriages, 1750-1930
Guatemala, Alta Verapaz, Civil Registration, 1877-1994
Guatemala, Baja Verapaz, Civil Registration, 1877-1994
Guatemala, Catholic Church Records, 1581-1977
Guatemala, Chimaltenango, Civil Registration, 1877-1994
Guatemala, Ciudad de Guatemala, Census, 1877
Guatemala, El Progreso, Civil Registration, 1877-1994
Guatemala, Escuintla, Civil Registration, 1877-1994
Guatemala, Guatemala, Civil Registration, 1877-2006
Guatemala, Huehuetenango, Civil Registration, 1877-1994
Guatemala, Izabal, Civil Registration, 1877-1994
Guatemala, Jalapa, Civil Registration, 1877-1994
Guatemala, Jutiapa, Civil Registration, 1877-1994
Guatemala, Petén, Civil Registration, 1877-1994
Guatemala, Quetzaltenango, Civil Registration, 1877-1994
Guatemala, Quiché, Civil Registration, 1877-1994
Guatemala, Retalhuleu, Civil Registration, 1877-1994
Guatemala, Sacatepéquez, Civil Registration, 1877-1994
Guatemala, San Marcos, Civil Registration, 1877-1994
Guatemala, Santa Rosa, Civil Registration, 1877-1994
Guatemala, Sololá, Civil Registration, 1877-1994
Guatemala, Suchitepéquez, Civil Registration, 1877-1994
Guatemala, Zacapa, Civil Registration, 1877-1994
Haiti, Port-au-Prince, Civil Registration, 1794-2012
Honduras Baptisms, 1730-1930
Honduras Marriages, 1800-1910
Honduras, Catholic Church Records, 1633-1978
Honduras, Civil Registration, 1841-1968
Jamaica Births and Baptisms, 1752-1920
Jamaica, Church of England Parish Register Transcripts, 1664-1880
Jamaica, Civil Registration, 1880-1999
Nicaragua Civil Registration, 1809-2013
Nicaragua, Diocese of Managua, Catholic Church Records, 1740-1960
Panama Baptisms, 1750-1938
Panama Deaths, 1840-1930
Panama Marriages, 1800-1950
Panama, Catholic Church Records, 1707-1973
New Zealand, Auckland, Port Albert, Membership Lists and Minutes from the Church of Christ, 1875-1926
Poland, Evangelical Church Books, 1700-2005
Massachusetts, Revolutionary War, Index Cards to Muster Rolls, 1775-1783

 

What's Been Fixed

View the January 21 release notes here. 

How to Update

For our Deluxe Edition users, all you have to do is connect to the Internet, start Legacy 8, and click on the "Install and Download Now" link on the Legacy Home tab. (If you're reading this from within the Legacy Home tab inside of Legacy 8, you'll first need to click on the Home button in the top left of the Legacy Home tab which looks like the following picture:

12-2-2013 9-36-15 AM

If you are a Standard Edition Legacy user, you will need to visit our website. Go to http://www.legacyfamilytree.com/DownloadUpdate.asp and follow the instructions.


Two New Virginia Webinars Released

Virginia, with its history reaching back to 1607, is one of the most important states for genealogical research! In recognition of that Legacy Family Tree Webinars has released two new Bonus webinars for family historians with Virginia ancestry. These join the Basics of Virginia Genealogy Research which is already in the Legacy Library.

The new webinars include:

We're working hard to give our webinar subscribers the educational classes they need to maximize their genealogical research! Both of these new classes are bonus webinars in the Legacy library. The webinar previews are always free.

Online and Offline Resources for Virginia Genealogy

The Old Dominion state of Virginia has many hidden gems for your research needs. Learn about a few of them and how they can aid in your ancestral quest.

Online and Offline Resources for Virginia Genealogy

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Tips and Tricks for Using the Library of Virginia Website

The Library of Virginia is an amazing resource for researches. Learn how to use the website, what it contains, and strategies for success.

Tips and Tricks for Using the Library of Virginia Website

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These webinars join another excellent Virginia webinar already in the library:

The Basics of Virginia Research

If you are new to Virginia research, or simply need a refresher of the Old Dominion State, this is the webinar for you. Learn about its history, records and repositories as well as learning some valuable tips for researching there. Yes, there will be suggestions on how to work around those pesky burned counties in addition to African and Native American research.  *** This webinar is currently FREE to watch until January 27, 2016 * Click either link to watch.

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Not a member yet?

Legacy Family Tree Webinars provides genealogy education where-you-are through live and recorded online webinars and videos. Learn from the best instructors in genealogy including Thomas MacEntee, Judy Russell, J. Mark Lowe, Lisa Louise Cooke, Megan Smolenyak, Tom Jones, and many more. Learn at your convenience. On-demand classes are available 24 hours a day! All you need is a computer or mobile device with an Internet connection.

Subscribe today and get access to this BONUS members-only webinar AND all of this:

  • All 298 classes in the library (443 hours of quality genealogy education)
  • 1,312 pages of instructors' handouts
  • Chat logs from the live webinars
  • Additional 5% off anything at FamilyTreeWebinars.com
  • Chance for a bonus subscribers-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Additional members-only webinars

It's just $49.95/year or $9.95/month.

Subscribe

 We've got a brand new line up of speakers for 2016! All live webinars are free to watch.

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Print the 2016 webinar brochure here.

 


The Basics of Virginia Research - free webinar by Shannon Combs-Bennett now online for limited time

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The recording of today's webinar, "The Basics of Virginia Research" by Shannon Combs-Bennett PLUS the after-webinar party is now available to view for free for a limited time at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com.

If you are new to Virginia research, or simply need a refresher of the Old Dominion State, this is the webinar for you. Learn about its history, records and repositories as well as learning some valuable tips for researching there. Yes, there will be suggestions on how to work around those pesky burned counties in addition to African and Native American research.

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 44 minute recording of "The Basics of Virginia Research" is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership.

Coupon code

Use webinar coupon code - virginia - for 10% off anything at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com or www.LegacyFamilyTreeStore.com, valid through Monday, January 25, 2016. 

Virginia GenealogyLegacy QuickGuide: Virginia Genealogy - 2.95

Looking to find those elusive Old Dominion ancestors? The Virginia Genealogy Legacy QuickGuide™ contains useful information including a timeline of Virginia history events, tips on Virginia research strategy, outline of major immigrant groups, and more. Also included are links to websites and resources covering vital records, church records, census records, as well as general Virginia resources. This handy 7-page PDF guide can be used on your computer or mobile device for anytime access.

Virginia was named for Queen Elizabeth I, known as the “Virgin Queen.” Jamestown was the first English settlement, and was established in 1607. The first of the original Thirteen Colonies, Virginia is the birthplace of eight United States Presidents, six First Ladies, and the final resting place for seven presidents.

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Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 298 classes, 443 hours of genealogy education)
  • On-demand access to the instructor handouts (now 1,306 pages)
  • On-demand access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Chance for a members-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
  • Ability to view which webinars you are registered for
  • Use of the playlist, resume watching, and jump-to features

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year
  • Monthly membership: $9.95/month

Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • The Paper-Less Genealogist by Denise May Levenick. January 27.
  • 7 Unique Technologies for Genealogy Discoveries at MyHeritage by Mike Mansfield. 1/29.
  • The Scots-Irish in America by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen. February 10.
  • Getting Started with Microsoft Word by Thomas MacEntee. February 17.
  • Problem Solving with FANs by Beth Foulk. February 19.
  • A Guided Tour of Cyndi's List 2.0 by Cyndi Ingle. February 24.
  • The War of 1812 Records - Preserving the Pensions by Michael Hall. March 2.
  • Making YDNA and mtDNA Part of Your Family History by Diahan Southard. March 4.
  • How Do I Know That's My Ancestor? by Amy Johnson Crow. March 9.
  • The Private Laws of the Federal and State Governments by Judy Russell. March 16.
  • Introduction to German Parish Records by Gail Blankenau. March 23.
  • Proof Arguments - How to Write Them and Why They Matter by Warren Bittner. March 30.
  • Getting to Know Findmypast - Your Source for British and Irish Genealogy by Jen Baldwin. April 6.
  • Confirming Enslaved Ancestors Utilizing DNA by Melvin Collier. April 8.
  • U.S. Land Records - State Land States by Mary Hill. April 13.
  • Fire Insurance Maps - The Google Maps of Their Day by Jill Morelli. April 20.
  • England and Wales - Rummaging in the Parish Chests by Kirsty Gray. April 27.
  • Google Drive for Genealogists by Thomas MacEntee. May 4.
  • Dirty Pictures - Save Your Family Photos from Ruin by Denise Levenick. May 11.
  • Messages from the Grave - Listening to Your Ancestor's Tombstone by Elissa Scalise Powell. May 13.
  • Mining the Über-sites for German Ancestors by Jim Beidler. May 18.
  • Discover American Ancestors (NEHGS) by Lindsay Fulton. May 25.
  • Get the Most from AmericanAncestors.org by Claire Vail. June 1.
  • Researching Your Washington State Ancestors by Mary Roddy. June 8.
  • Introduction to the Freedmen's Bureau by Angela Walton-Raji. June 10.
  • Ticked Off! Those Pesky Pre-1850 Census Tic Marks by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen. June 15.
  • Digging Deeper in German Parish Records by Gail Blankenau. June 22.
  • Circles or Triangles? What Shape is Your DNA? by Diahan Southard. June 29.
  • Navigating Naturalization Records by Lisa Alzo. July 6.
  • A Genealogist's Guide to Heraldry by Shannon Combs-Bennett. July 13.
  • Finding French Ancestors by Luana Darby. July 15.
  • Organize Your Online Life by Lisa Louise Cooke. July 20.
  • Researching Women - Community Cookbooks and What They Tell Us About Our Ancestors by Gena Philibert-Ortega. July 27.
  • The Germanic French - Researching Alsatian and Lorrainian Families by John Philip Colletta. July 30.
  • Solutions for Missing and Scarce Records by Tom Jones. July 30.
  • Getting Started with Microsoft PowerPoint by Thomas MacEntee. August 3.
  • The Battle for Bounty Land - War of 1812 and Mexican-American Wars by Beth Foulk. August 10.
  • Homestead Act of 1862 - Following the Witnesses by Bernice Bennett. August 12.
  • Successfully Applying to a Lineage Society by Amy Johnson Crow. August 17.
  • Using Findmypast to Unlock Your Irish Ancestry by Brian Donovan. August 24.
  • The Treasure Trove in Legislative Petitions by Judy Russell. September 14.
  • Clooz - A Document-Based Software Companion by Richard Thomas. September 16.
  • How to Use FamilySearch.org for Beginners by Devin Ashby. September 21.
  • Beginning Polish Genealogy by Lisa Alzo and Jonathan Shea. September 28.
  • AHA! Analysis of Handwriting for Genealogical Research by Ron Arons. October 5.
  • Time and Place - Using Genealogy's Cross-Hairs by Jim Beidler. October 12.
  • Finding Your Ancestors' German Hometown by Ursula Krause. October 14.
  • Social History Websites That Bring Your Ancestor's Story to Life by Gena Philibert-Ortega. October 19.
  • Flip for Flickr - Share, Store and Save Your Family Photos by Maureen Taylor. October 26.
  • Analysis and Correlation - Two Keys to Sound Conclusions by Chris Staats. November 2.
  • Publishing a Genealogy E-Book by Thomas MacEntee. November 9.
  • Dating Family Photographs by Jane Neff Rollins. November 16.
  • Nature & Nurture - Family History for Adoptees by Janet Hovorka and Amy Slade. November 18.
  • Multi-Media Story Telling by Devin Ashby. November 30.
  • Becoming a Genealogy Detective by Sharon Atkins. December 7.
  • From the Heartland - Utilizing Online Resources in Midwest Research by Luana Darby. December 14.
  • Tracing Your European Ancestors by Julie Goucher. December 16.
  • An Introduction to BillionGraves by Garth Fitzner. December 21.

Click here to register.

Print the 2016 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


Tuesday's Tip - Loading the Source Clipboard with 5 sources vs. saving loaded clipboards

  TT - Source Clipboard


Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

The difference between loading the Source Clipboard with 5 sources and saving loaded clipboards

If you go to Options > Customize > 7. Sources and then scroll down to Option 7.5 Source Clipboard - Capacity you will see two options. The second option is to allow up to 5 sources at once on the Source Clipboard. Some people get a little confused about this. If you load more than one source on the clipboard and you then paste the source, ALL of the sources on that clipboard will be pasted at one time. Some people think if they put 5 sources on the clipboard they can then choose between them as needed.

You CAN save clipboards for later use but the above is not the way to do it. If you open the Source Clipboard at the bottom you will see Save Citations to Disk and Load Citations from Disk. This is where you can save up to TEN different clipboards that you can flip flop between.

 

SourceClipboard

 

 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips checkout the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis is part of the technical support team at Millennia, the makers of the Legacy Family Tree software program. With over 20 years of research experience, Michele’s passion is helping new genealogists get started on the right foot through her writings, classes and lectures. She is the former staff genealogist and weekly columnist for the McDuffie Mirror and now authors Ancestoring, a blog geared toward the beginner/intermediate researcher.

 


Register for Webinar Wednesday - The Basics of Virginia Research by Shannon Combs-Bennett

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If you are new to Virginia research, or simply need a refresher of the Old Dominion State, this is the webinar for you. Learn about its history, records and repositories as well as learning some valuable tips for researching there. Yes, there will be suggestions on how to work around those pesky burned counties in addition to African and Native American research.

Join us and Shannon Combs-Bennett for the live webinar Wednesday, January 20, 2016 at 2pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion. 

Download the syllabus

In preparation for the webinar, download the supplemental syllabus materials here. The syllabus is available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers. Log in here or subscribe here.

Registerbut 

Or register for multiple webinars at once by clicking here.

Not sure if you already registered?

Login to view your registration status for this webinar (available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers).

Test Your Webinar Connection

To ensure that your webinar connection is ready to go, click here.

Can't make it to the live event?

No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

ShannonBennett-144x144Shannon Combs-Bennett, owner of T2 Family History, is a speaker and author based out of Virginia. She enjoys teaching about a wide range of topics from DNA to methodology. Currently Shannon is the Creative Director for The In-Depth Genealogist. You can learn more about her athttp://t2familyhistory.com.

Add it to your Google Calendar

With our Google Calendar button, you will never forget our upcoming webinars. Simply click the button to add it to your calendar. You can then optionally embed the webinar events (and even turn them on and off) into your own personal calendar. If you have already added the calendar, you do not have to do it again - the new webinar events will automatically appear.

Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Wednesday, January 20, 2016 at:

  • 2pm Eastern (U.S.)
  • 1pm Central
  • 12pm Mountain
  • 11am Pacific

Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email both 1 day and 1 hour prior to the live webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone.

We look forward to seeing you all there!


Snagit Software for Genealogists - free webinar by Michael Brophy now online for limited time

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The recording of today's webinar, "Snagit Software for Genealogists" by Michael Brophy is now available to view for free for a limited time at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com.

Snagit possesses a multitude of applications for capturing images and video. In this webinar, you will learn how to create engaging images to enhance your family history presentation using easy-to-use tools.

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 20 minute recording of "Snagit Software for Genealogists" is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership.

Coupon code

Use webinar coupon code - snagit - for 10% off anything at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com or www.LegacyFamilyTreeStore.com, valid through Tuesday, January 19, 2016. 

B_8UNLOCDL-2T

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 295 classes, 442 hours of genealogy education)
  • On-demand access to the instructor handouts (now 1,302 pages)
  • On-demand access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Chance for a members-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
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  • Use of the playlist, resume watching, and jump-to features

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year
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Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • The Basics of Virginia Research by Shannon Combs-Bennett. January 20.
  • The Paper-Less Genealogist by Denise May Levenick. January 27.
  • 7 Unique Technologies for Genealogy Discoveries at MyHeritage by Mike Mansfield. 1/29.
  • The Scots-Irish in America by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen. February 10.
  • Getting Started with Microsoft Word by Thomas MacEntee. February 17.
  • Problem Solving with FANs by Beth Foulk. February 19.
  • A Guided Tour of Cyndi's List 2.0 by Cyndi Ingle. February 24.
  • The War of 1812 Records - Preserving the Pensions by Michael Hall. March 2.
  • Making YDNA and mtDNA Part of Your Family History by Diahan Southard. March 4.
  • How Do I Know That's My Ancestor? by Amy Johnson Crow. March 9.
  • The Private Laws of the Federal and State Governments by Judy Russell. March 16.
  • Introduction to German Parish Records by Gail Blankenau. March 23.
  • Proof Arguments - How to Write Them and Why They Matter by Warren Bittner. March 30.
  • Getting to Know Findmypast - Your Source for British and Irish Genealogy by Jen Baldwin. April 6.
  • Confirming Enslaved Ancestors Utilizing DNA by Melvin Collier. April 8.
  • U.S. Land Records - State Land States by Mary Hill. April 13.
  • Fire Insurance Maps - The Google Maps of Their Day by Jill Morelli. April 20.
  • England and Wales - Rummaging in the Parish Chests by Kirsty Gray. April 27.
  • Google Drive for Genealogists by Thomas MacEntee. May 4.
  • Dirty Pictures - Save Your Family Photos from Ruin by Denise Levenick. May 11.
  • Messages from the Grave - Listening to Your Ancestor's Tombstone by Elissa Scalise Powell. May 13.
  • Mining the Über-sites for German Ancestors by Jim Beidler. May 18.
  • Discover American Ancestors (NEHGS) by Lindsay Fulton. May 25.
  • Get the Most from AmericanAncestors.org by Claire Vail. June 1.
  • Researching Your Washington State Ancestors by Mary Roddy. June 8.
  • Introduction to the Freedmen's Bureau by Angela Walton-Raji. June 10.
  • Ticked Off! Those Pesky Pre-1850 Census Tic Marks by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen. June 15.
  • Digging Deeper in German Parish Records by Gail Blankenau. June 22.
  • Circles or Triangles? What Shape is Your DNA? by Diahan Southard. June 29.
  • Navigating Naturalization Records by Lisa Alzo. July 6.
  • A Genealogist's Guide to Heraldry by Shannon Combs-Bennett. July 13.
  • Finding French Ancestors by Luana Darby. July 15.
  • Organize Your Online Life by Lisa Louise Cooke. July 20.
  • Researching Women - Community Cookbooks and What They Tell Us About Our Ancestors by Gena Philibert-Ortega. July 27.
  • The Germanic French - Researching Alsatian and Lorrainian Families by John Philip Colletta. July 30.
  • Solutions for Missing and Scarce Records by Tom Jones. July 30.
  • Getting Started with Microsoft PowerPoint by Thomas MacEntee. August 3.
  • The Battle for Bounty Land - War of 1812 and Mexican-American Wars by Beth Foulk. August 10.
  • Homestead Act of 1862 - Following the Witnesses by Bernice Bennett. August 12.
  • Successfully Applying to a Lineage Society by Amy Johnson Crow. August 17.
  • Using Findmypast to Unlock Your Irish Ancestry by Brian Donovan. August 24.
  • The Treasure Trove in Legislative Petitions by Judy Russell. September 14.
  • Clooz - A Document-Based Software Companion by Richard Thomas. September 16.
  • How to Use FamilySearch.org for Beginners by Devin Ashby. September 21.
  • Beginning Polish Genealogy by Lisa Alzo and Jonathan Shea. September 28.
  • AHA! Analysis of Handwriting for Genealogical Research by Ron Arons. October 5.
  • Time and Place - Using Genealogy's Cross-Hairs by Jim Beidler. October 12.
  • Finding Your Ancestors' German Hometown by Ursula Krause. October 14.
  • Social History Websites That Bring Your Ancestor's Story to Life by Gena Philibert-Ortega. October 19.
  • Flip for Flickr - Share, Store and Save Your Family Photos by Maureen Taylor. October 26.
  • Analysis and Correlation - Two Keys to Sound Conclusions by Chris Staats. November 2.
  • Publishing a Genealogy E-Book by Thomas MacEntee. November 9.
  • Dating Family Photographs by Jane Neff Rollins. November 16.
  • Nature & Nurture - Family History for Adoptees by Janet Hovorka and Amy Slade. November 18.
  • Multi-Media Story Telling by Devin Ashby. November 30.
  • Becoming a Genealogy Detective by Sharon Atkins. December 7.
  • From the Heartland - Utilizing Online Resources in Midwest Research by Luana Darby. December 14.
  • Tracing Your European Ancestors by Julie Goucher. December 16.
  • An Introduction to BillionGraves by Garth Fitzner. December 21.

Click here to register.

Print the 2016 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


Oh Those Dit Names!

Oh those dit names

Have you experienced the problems genealogists can encounter when searching French ancestors who used dit names? A dit name is an alias or nickname, in essence a second surname, given to a family. This second surname can be used in place of the original surname or it can form a double surname. A dit name doesn't usually apply to one person, but to many members and generations of a family. Dit names are generally found in France and New France (present day Quebec) and can be very challenging for researchers.

The Dutch in New Netherland (present day New York) had something similar with their frequent use of nicknames to identify individuals. Those nicknames often became the established family surname after the English takeover and demand for standard surnames.

A dit name might be derived from any of the following:

* A nickname
* A location of origin
* A physical characteristic
* Land owned
* A name used in the Army
* The first and last name might be combined to form one name
* Various other reasons

For example I have an ancestor who settled in New France (present day Quebec) in the 1660s. His name was Simeon LeRoi.

 His baptismal surname was LeRoi. His dit name was Audy or Ody. In contemporary records we might find him as

* Simeon LeRoi dit Audy (or Ody)
* Simeon LeRoi
* Simeon Audy or Ody
* Simeon Audy (or Ody) dit LeRoi

 

LFT Dit Name LeRoy dit Ody 1670 copy
1670 Baptism. Translation of underlined portion “Jean, fils de Simeon le Roy dit Ody” Jean, son of Simeon LeRoy dit Ody” Image Source: Ancestry.com. Quebec, Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1968

 

Compounding the challenge of finding ancestors who used dit names we also have changes from French to English, or in the case of my LeRoi family, French to Dutch. The LeRoi aka LeRoy surname underwent great changes, becoming LeRoy dit Audy or Ody, Audy and Ody in New France (Quebec). Simeon’s son Jonar left Quebec for New York where his name became Jonas Larroway (with variant spellings). Other changes from French to English were LeRoy in the United States and Canada.

Some of Simeon's sons assumed the Audy dit name as a surname and there are Audy descendants today who are from Simeon LeRoi. Some descendants use the LeRoy surname.

So what is the diligent researcher to do when it comes to entering such a name in a genealogy database? It is considered good practice to choose one standard way of entering the surname. It is equally important to record the name exactly as it occurs in each document you find. Your notes section comes in handy for this. As an example, for my Simeon LeRoi dit Audy, I might opt to use the LeRoy variation but I will record each name as found in various records. If, for example, I find a record with him recorded as “Audy” I make note of that.

It is also a good idea to consult Jetté, René, and Micheline Lécuyer, Répertoire des noms de famille du Québec des origines à 1825. (Repertory of Family Names of Québec from the Beginning to 1825). Montréal, Québec, Canada: Institut Généalogique J.L. et Associés, 1988. This book consists of a list of dit names and if your ancestor is found, it will give you the standardized surname in use.

You can also check for your ancestor’s name at the American-French Genealogical Society website as it contains a very complete list of French-Canadian Surnames:Variants, Dit, Anglicizations, etc. When I look up my ancestor’s dit name of Audy, I find it listed with Roy, LeRoy and Ody

Another place to learn about dit names and to check for your ancestor’s name is at the Family Names and Nicknames in Colonial Quebec website.

If at any time during your research you encounter a stumbling block of an ancestor whose surname seems to disappear, consider the possibility that he may have a dit name.

It's a challenge to trace dit name ancestors but researchers need to proceed methodically and carefully. If you have a dit name ancestor in your lines, be sure you keep all possible name variations in mind such as dit names, accidental name changes, deliberate name changes, spelling variations, and phonetic misinterpretations.

 

Lorine McGinnis Schulze is a Canadian genealogist who has been involved with genealogy and history for more than thirty years. In 1996 Lorine created the Olive Tree Genealogy website and its companion blog. Lorine is the author of many published genealogical and historical articles and books.

 

 

 

 

 


FamilySearch Records Update: New records for Australia, Belgium, Bolivia, Italy, Sweden, and United States

A few domestic and international updates this week. For the United States you'll see some new content for United States GenealogyBank Obituaries 1980-2014, North Carolina State Supreme Court Case Files 1800-1909, Utah Death Certificates 1904-1964, and the Rhode Island District Court Naturalization Indexes 1906-1991. Find these and additional updates below for Australia, Belgium, Bolivia, Italy, and Sweden.

COLLECTION

INDEXED RECORDS

DIGITAL RECORDS

COMMENTS

Australia Tasmania Miscellaneous Records 1829-2001

0

68,774

Added images to an existing collection

Belgium Hainaut Civil Registration 1600-1913

32,642

208

Added indexed records and images to an existing collection

Bolivia Catholic Church Records 1566-1996

35,765

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Italy Napoli Civil Registration (State Archive) 1809-1865

146,760

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Sweden Örebro Church Records 1613-1918; index 1635-1860

42,405

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

United States GenealogyBank Obituaries 1980-2014

0

27,075

Added images to an existing collection

North Carolina State Supreme Court Case Files 1800-1909

876,769

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Utah Death Certificates 1904-1964

0

25,217

Added images to an existing collection

Rhode Island District Court Naturalization Indexes 1906-1991

136,534

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Help Us Publish More Free Records Online

Searchable historical records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of online volunteers worldwide. These volunteers transcribe (or index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are always needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published weekly online on FamilySearch.org. Learn how you can volunteer to help provide free access to the world’s historical genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/Indexing.
 
About FamilySearch International
 
FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Register for Webinar Friday - Snagit software for Genealogists by Michael Brophy

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Snagit possesses a multitude of applications for capturing images and video. Learn how to create engaging images to enhance your family history presentation using easy-to-use tools.

Join us and Michael Brophy for the live webinar Friday, January 15, 2016 at 2pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion. 

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In preparation for the webinar, download the supplemental syllabus materials here. The syllabus is available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers. Log in here or subscribe here.

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Can't make it to the live event?

No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

MichaelBrophy-144x144Michael Brophy is a nationally known, professional genealogical researcher, heir search specialist, and lecturer from the Boston area. He has served as Program Director and Publicity Director for the Massachusetts Genealogical Council. He was the first Treasurer of the New England Association of Professional Genealogists. Mike earned an MBA degree from Suffolk University and a BBA from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Mike was featured on the Irish TV series Dead Money, a genealogy TV show about heir searchers. In 2010, Mr. Brophy was hired to conduct research for the NBC television program Who Do You Think You Are?, on an episode dedicated to the family history of actress Gwyneth Paltrow. He has lectured on a wide variety of genealogy subjects at the National Genealogy Society’s Annual Conference in 2014, 2012 and 2011. He specializes in New England and Irish genealogy subjects. His genealogy education includes seven certificates from the Institute of Genealogy and Historic Research (IGHR) and certificates in Private Investigation and Advanced Forensic Genealogy from Boston University.

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  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone.

We look forward to seeing you all there!