Tuesday's Tip - Label Those Tags!

  Legacy Family Tree Tuesday's Tip - Label Those Tags!

Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques. 

Label Those Tags!

Whenever you use tagging (see the numbered boxes in the image 1-9 - those are tags), make sure you go to TOOLS > ADVANCED TAGGING and label the tags so that you know what is on what tag. It is VERY easy to forget what you have tagged especially if you have multiple tags in play. If you want to see what a particular tag means, you don't have to go back to this screen, you can simply hover over that tag number in the Family View or Pedigree View. 

In the example below, Tag 1 is used to help find some of Geoff's best ancestors!

Use Advanced Tagging to Label Your Tags!


For more about advanced tagging see this article: http://support.legacyfamilytree.com/article/AA-00949/0/Tagging-Advanced-Tagging.html

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips checkout the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis is part of the technical support team at Millennia, the makers of the Legacy Family Tree software program. With over 20 years of research experience, Michele’s passion is helping new genealogists get started on the right foot through her writings, classes and lectures. She is the former staff genealogist and weekly columnist for the McDuffie Mirror and now authors Ancestoring, a blog geared toward the beginner/intermediate researcher.

 

 


Tuesday's Tip - Using Secret Bars

  Tuesday's Tip - Using Secret Bars in Legacy Family Tree

Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

Using Secret Bars

There are some "secret" popup bars on the Family View of Legacy Family Tree. If you put your mouse cursor over certain areas this secret bar will pop up and you can then click it and it will do something. Most people find the one that allows you to scroll through a person's marriages on their own but there are more. Below are screenshots of secret bars that may be new to you.

Look for the RED arrow below in each photo to identify the location of the secret bar.

1. Rotate through husband's Spouses

Rotate through Husband's Spouses

2. Rotate through wife's Spouses

Rotate through Wife's Spouses

3. Rotate through siblings of highlight person

Rotate through siblings of highlight person

 4. Move preferred child up to main position

Move preferred child up to main position

5. Rotate through other parents of husband

Rotate through other parents of husband

6. Rotate through other parents of wife

Rotate through other parents of wife

 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips checkout the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis is part of the technical support team at Millennia, the makers of the Legacy Family Tree software program. With over 20 years of research experience, Michele’s passion is helping new genealogists get started on the right foot through her writings, classes and lectures. She is the former staff genealogist and weekly columnist for the McDuffie Mirror and now authors Ancestoring, a blog geared toward the beginner/intermediate researcher.

 

 


Tuesday's Tip - Recording Unknown Names

  Tuesday's Tip - Recording Unknown Names 

Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

Tuesday's Tip - Recording Unknown Names

Tip Level: Advanced 

Here is a really nifty trick. Have you ever wanted to record an unknown surname?

I recommended [—?—] because that is how unknown surnames are normally handled in the National Genealogical Society Quarterly (NGSQ) but someone remarked that Legacy was hitting on that as a Potential Problem.

Here is a copy and paste from the Help File:

"If you are entering something into either the given names field or the surname to indicate that the name is currently unknown, such as [—?—], NN, or ??? or something similar, these entries will normally cause a potential problems alert. If you would like to avoid the alerts on these name entries, you can do so by creating a file called UnknownName.txt in the [My Documents]\Legacy Family Tree\_AppData folder. The file should contain two strings consisting of one or more terms separated by space between each one. The first line is for unknown names that might be found in the Given Names field and the second line pertains to the Surname field. For example:

Child ???
[—?—] NN ???

You can create this file using a text editor."

I have an UnknownName.txt file. In my file the first line is blank because I have no given names that I want Legacy to skip (I always leave the given name field blank if I don't know what it is). My second link only contains
[—?—]
because that is the only thing I use for unknown surnames. The Help File shows 3 variations that you are telling Legacy to skip but that is for illustrative purposes only. No matter what you choose you need to be consistent so your UnknownName.txt file should only contain one entry on the second line.

 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips checkout the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis is part of the technical support team at Millennia, the makers of the Legacy Family Tree software program. With over 20 years of research experience, Michele’s passion is helping new genealogists get started on the right foot through her writings, classes and lectures. She is the former staff genealogist and weekly columnist for the McDuffie Mirror and now authors Ancestoring, a blog geared toward the beginner/intermediate researcher.


Tuesday Tip - Backup vs. Save As

Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

  Tuesday's Tip - Backup vs. Save As


Many people get confused between the options of Saving Legacy, Backing up Legacy and using the Save As command. This overview will clarify the three commands.

Saving Legacy

Legacy saves your file on the fly. When you close your file everything has been saved. When you open Legacy, this file will open on your screen. I highly recommend you tell Legacy to do this by going to OPTIONS > CUSTOMIZE > GENERAL SETTINGS . In Option 1.2 pick the 1st or 3rd option. If you only have one file then pick the 3rd so that there is no question.

Backing Up Legacy

You should also backup your file on a regular basis. You will rarely if ever need to restore a backup. In 11 years I have only had to restore a backup one time and that is when I had a hard drive failure. You should save your backups somewhere other than your hard drive for that very reason.

Save As

There is a SAVE AS command. What this does is it saves an exact copy of your database file. There are reasons that you might do this but the average user will not/should not use this command.

Why am I telling you this? We get emails all the time from people that have been restoring backups every single time they open Legacy. We have people that use the Save As command instead of backing up. These people end up with hundreds of Legacy files on their computer and if they open the wrong one they email us in a panic because they say that all of the data they added yesterday or last week or last month is suddenly gone.

A clue that you have been doing one of the above is that you will see file names with numbers behind them in brackets or parentheses or they word "copy" in parenthesis.

When we tell people to search their entire hard drive for .fdb files (the Windows command is *.fdb) they are sometimes quite surprised by what they find.

Most people should only have two .fdb files on their computer, their working family file and the Sample file that comes with Legacy. There are people that have more than one file though, the One-Name Study people and the One-Place Study people for example. Also those people that are professional genealogists and do client work will have an .fdb file for each client. There are some people that have their side in one file and their spouse's side in another but we really don't recommend that.

 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips checkout the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

 

Michele Simmons Lewis is part of the technical support team at Millennia, the makers of the Legacy Family Tree software program. With over 20 years of research experience, Michele’s passion is helping new genealogists get started on the right foot through her writings, classes and lectures. She is the former staff genealogist and weekly columnist for the McDuffie Mirror and now authors Ancestoring, a blog geared toward the beginner/intermediate researcher.


Legacy Tip - Syncing with FamilySearch to Solve Brick Walls

Did you know you can sync to FamilySearch without sharing any information to FamilySearch and without downloading any information from FamilySearch to your Legacy file?

Why would you want to do this?

This is especially helpful for brick walls. You can sync your brick wall and then wait. If you see your FamilySearch arrow turn from green to red you know that someone has edited your brick wall on FamilySearch. You can then open the FamilySearch screen, click the Changes tab (probably a good idea to click Refresh) and you will see what change was made and who made it. You can message the person by clicking the Goto Person link on the main FamilySearch screen to open up FamilySearch itself.

My #1 brick wall of all time is James Simmons, Sr. of South Carolina who was born 14 August 1764. This morning I noticed that James' arrow had changed to red. Four days ago someone added a child to James. I will be emailing this person as soon as I post this!

So how do you sync without uploading any information from Legacy to FamilySearch and without downloading any information from FamilySearch to Legacy?

Easy.

All you do is you go ahead and tell Legacy that a certain person on FamilySearch is a match.

Legacy will automatically add that person's FSID number to your person in Legacy. Now click the Share Data tab. Without transferring any information in either direction click the I am Finished Sharing Data. This will reset your arrows to green-green. I just clicked my button so that James will reset to green-green again.

 

Syncing with FamilySearch

 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips checkout the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis is part of the technical support team at Millennia, the makers of the Legacy Family Tree software program. With over 20 years of research experience, Michele’s passion is helping new genealogists get started on the right foot through her writings, classes and lectures. She is the former staff genealogist and weekly columnist for the McDuffie Mirror and now authors Ancestoring, a blog geared toward the beginner/intermediate researcher.

 

 


Tuesday's Tip - Printing a Duplicates List

Tuesday's Tip - Printing a Duplicates List
 

Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

Printing a Duplicates List and some other options

A lot of people overlook the fact that you can print the possible duplicates list. The reason it is overlooked is that the print option is BEFORE you actually run the Find Duplicates routine.

Go to TOOLS > MERGE DUPLICATES > FIND DUPLICATES

This is where the Print option is. If you click PRINT it will run the routine and then give you option to print the report. Most people will click CONTINUE and then find that they can't print a report from the Merge screen.

Another thing that is overlooked is that on this same screen (where Continue and Print are) there is an OPTIONS button. There are some powerful options here :) You can restrict the Find Duplicates routine to your current search list, you can restrict it to tagged individuals and you can tag the output from running the Find Duplicates routine.

  Legacy Family Tree -  TOOLS > MERGE DUPLICATES > FIND DUPLICATES

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips checkout the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis is part of the technical support team at Millennia, the makers of the Legacy Family Tree software program. With over 20 years of research experience, Michele’s passion is helping new genealogists get started on the right foot through her writings, classes and lectures. She is the former staff genealogist and weekly columnist for the McDuffie Mirror and now authors Ancestoring, a blog geared toward the beginner/intermediate researcher.


Tuesday's Tip - The Relationship Chart

  Tuesday's Tip - The Relationship Chart

 

Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

My new favorite chart - the Relationship Chart

I have lots of favorite charts depending on what I am doing at any moment. 

I just looked on AncestryDNA and I have a brand new 2nd cousin match so I contacted her. This happens to be someone that is interested in her DNA and family history but isn't a genealogist so she was having a hard time visualizing our connection. As soon as she told me who her parents and grandparents were I knew where she belonged.

A picture is worth a thousand words so I added her and her parents (I already had her grandparents) to Legacy. I was then able to go to TOOLS > RELATIONSHIP and then I put myself in the left box and her in the right box. I finished the process by pressing PRINT.

I set up the report to look nice with minimal info so that it wouldn't be overwhelming and then I sent it to a PDF. I sent her the chart and she was so appreciative.  Not 15 minutes later someone contacted me about a match on Family Tree DNA. After a few questions back and forth he turned out to be a third cousin, once removed. Yup, I generated a chart for him and sent it to him.

I generated one for my dad and his first cousin Bobbie Joyce to give you an idea. The chart has the relationship between the two at the top and their grandparents are labeled as the "common ancestor." The direct line connection is in bold. This chart is so easy to understand even for the lay genealogist. 

Give it a try and share it with someone in your family!

 

Tuesday's Tip - The Relationship Chart

 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips checkout the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis is part of the technical support team at Millennia, the makers of the Legacy Family Tree software program. With over 20 years of research experience, Michele’s passion is helping new genealogists get started on the right foot through her writings, classes and lectures. She is the former staff genealogist and weekly columnist for the McDuffie Mirror and now authors Ancestoring, a blog geared toward the beginner/intermediate researcher.

 


Tuesday's Tip - FamilySearch Images

  TT - FamilySearch Images


Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

FamilySearch Images

By now everyone knows that FamilySearch has a plethora of records online but did you know that there are a lot more records online that you can't readily see? If you just do a search on the Documents page you will miss them. If you do a search in the FHL card catalog you might just luck up and find a record set that has a link to images but since it hasn't yet been pulled into the indexing project you will not seen them in the list of records.

For example, take a look at this -Deeds, 1786-1865; index to deeds, 1786-1913, Greenville County (South Carolina). Register of Mesne Conveyance.

https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/472237?availability=Family%20History%20Library

Scroll down on this page and the microfilms that have cameras next to them are accessible online as images. Click the camera and you will be taken right to the online images of the roll of microfilm.

FamilySearch-cameraicon

 

Index to deeds, 1786-1913, Greenville County (South Carolina). Register of Mesne Conveyance on FamilySearch
Index to deeds, 1786-1913, Greenville County (South Carolina). Register of Mesne Conveyance on FamilySearch

 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips checkout the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis is part of the technical support team at Millennia, the makers of the Legacy Family Tree software program. With over 20 years of research experience, Michele’s passion is helping new genealogists get started on the right foot through her writings, classes and lectures. She is the former staff genealogist and weekly columnist for the McDuffie Mirror and now authors Ancestoring, a blog geared toward the beginner/intermediate researcher.

 

 


Tuesday's Tip - Adding URLs to the Media Gallery

  Adding URLs to the Media Gallery


Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

Adding URLs

For some reason people overlook the option to add URLs to the Media Gallery. I just added two and that is what made me think about it. These are two self-published books on FamilySearch Books that I wanted to have quick access to. These genealogies are of related lines and I am in the middle of a huge yDNA project. I am trying to attack the problem from all angles.

If I open the Media Gallery and simply double click the icon the website will launch in Google Chrome (the browser I have set in Legacy). There is a Launch Browser button on the entry screen but that is more for testing the link. You don't need to open this screen to open the URL.

I added a Simmons yDNA event and added the media there so that I could attach the event/URLs to the principles in the study. I have a few more URLs to add first and then I will share the event. I am usually more of a copy and paste events kind of girl but in this case I am pretty sure I will be updating this event with more references so sharing makes more sense. If I copy and paste I would have to update all of them.

  Urls

 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips checkout the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis is part of the technical support team at Millennia, the makers of the Legacy Family Tree software program. With over 20 years of research experience, Michele’s passion is helping new genealogists get started on the right foot through her writings, classes and lectures. She is the former staff genealogist and weekly columnist for the McDuffie Mirror and now authors Ancestoring, a blog geared toward the beginner/intermediate researcher.

 

 


Tuesday's Tip - Source Citations

  TT - Source Citations


Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

Source Citations

Some people get overwhelmed and stressed out when it comes to citing their sources. If you know WHY you are citing a source it will make more sense to you. There are two reasons why you cite your sources.

1) You should craft your citation so that anyone coming behind you has the information they need to be able to find the source for themselves.

2) Your citation needs to contain the information other researchers needs to have to be able to weigh the evidence. It will also help YOU weigh your evidence.

The second one actually hangs more people up. For example, I need to know if you looked at the original document in a courthouse or if you looked at the document on microfilm, or if you read a transcription of the document online or if you read an abstract of the document in a book, etc. Knowing exactly what you used as a source gives me the information I need so that I can weigh your evidence.

The first two chapters in Elizabeth Shown Mills' book Evidence Explained will help you understand both concepts ("Fundamentals of Evidence Analysis" and "Fundamentals of Citation"). The book goes on to give countless examples of all of the different types of sources you will encounter making it very easy to figure out what you need to record in your citation but it is still very important to understand the rationale behind it (those first two chapters). Legacy's SourceWriter templates are based on the examples in Ms. Mills' book. It is a shortcut to getting consistent citations that contain the needed information.

The biggest challenge is figuring out which template to use. If you are looking at an online index of births you would not choose the birth certificates template because you are not looking at birth certificates. We get a lot of questions from people who are at a loss on how to fill out the fields because they don't have the information that goes in those fields. It is because they are using the wrong template for that source.

Having said that, you might have a choice between two templates based on where you want the emphasis (which piece of information comes first in the citation) and you might want to fill out the fields in a certain way to get the citation to read out the way you want. Understanding the hows and whys of putting together the citation will help you make those decisions. Crafting a good citation is an art.

I highly recommend Ms. Mills' book. It is an investment in your education. Please don't make the mistake of skipping those first two chapters. There is also an Evidence Explained website and an active forum where you can ask citation specific questions. There are a lot of very helpful articles on the webpage you can read with real life examples. https://www.evidenceexplained.com/

Geoff did an excellent webinar on Legacy's SourceWriter templates that will answer your questions specific to how the SourceWriter templates work. Sources and Citations Made Simple, Standard and Powerful. You don't want to miss this one and it is FREE. http://familytreewebinars.com/download.php?webinar_id=201
 
Citing your sources should not be stressful.
 
  Source Citations


Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips checkout the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis is part of the technical support team at Millennia, the makers of the Legacy Family Tree software program. With over 20 years of research experience, Michele’s passion is helping new genealogists get started on the right foot through her writings, classes and lectures. She is the former staff genealogist and weekly columnist for the McDuffie Mirror and now authors Ancestoring, a blog geared toward the beginner/intermediate researcher.