Soldier’s Homes (1865-1930): Caring for our Veterans - free webinar by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA, now online for limited time

Soldier’s Homes (1865-1930): Caring for our Veterans - free webinar by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA, now online for limited time

The recording of Wednesday's webinar, "Soldier’s Homes (1865-1930): Caring for our Veterans” by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA, is now available to view at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com for free for a limited time.

Webinar Description

The National Home for Volunteer Soldiers, was established by an act of Congress in 1865. The purpose of the home system (initially called the National Asylum) was to provide for the care of the large number of wounded and disabled veterans from the Civil War. Records of kinship and other treasures abound in these records—over 400,000 records of these veterans are online free of charge. The home from its inception was intended to be more like a planned community of today, than a simple home and hospital. Extensive amenities and vocational training were provided. The largest branch and showpiece of the system was the Central Branch at Dayton, Ohio, Eventually growing to 11 homes or branches spread across the country, they are today Veteran’s Administration hospitals. Additionally, state and Confederate homes were established. We will also discuss strategies for finding these records.
 
View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 31 minute recording of "Soldier’s Homes (1865-1930): Caring for our Veterans" is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. If you have a webinar membership, it is available anytime.

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 1,057 classes, 1,341 hours of genealogy education)
  • On-demand access to the instructor handouts (now 4,584 pages)
  • On-demand access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Chance for a members-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
  • Ability to view which webinars you are registered for
  • Use of the playlist, resume watching, and jump-to features

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year

Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

Native American Research: Things You May Not Know 11/19/2019

Paula Stuart-Warren, CG, FMGS, FUGA

MyHeritage's SuperSearch (German) 11/20/2019

Silvia da Silva

A la Karte: Borders, Maps and Gazetteers for German Genealogists 11/20/2019

James M. Beidler

No Will? No Problem! 11/22/2019

Sharon Monson

MyHeritage: les fonctionnalités à utiliser absolument (French) 11/25/2019

Elisabeth Zetland

Genealogie voor beginners: hoe start ik mijn familiestamboom op MyHeritage? (Dutch) 11/25/2019

Willeke Binnendijk

MyHeritage DNA - en oversikt (Norwegian) 11/26/2019

Yael Beck

I Received DNA Matches, Now What? 11/26/2019

Daniel Horowitz

Buried Treasures: What's in the English Parish Chest 12/3/2019

Paul Milner

Marriages Here, There, and Nowhere: Finding Gretna Greens and Borders 12/17/2019

J. Mark Lowe, CG, FUGA

Print the 2019 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


Using Newspaper Resources on FamilySearch

Recently I wrote an article called Navigating Newspaper Research and one of our readers asked a really good question that needs to be explored.

James Stevenson wrote:

    I have missed something along the way and came to a dead-end. I have not made much use of FamilySearch and perhaps that is the problem. When you say, "Now, you’ll notice FamilySearch is not on the above list. FamilySearch doesn’t have newspapers per se but they still should be searched. Check the FamilySearch Catalog first. You can search by the Place your ancestor lived in and then the category Newspapers." I thought I was going to  be able to search newspapers or at least indexes. In clicking on the link "FamilySearch Catalog" I can indeed put in a place name and then see a list of newspapers (categories) associated with that place, but what then? I was not able to see how to search for my ancestor's name in the newspapers. Perhaps you could elaborate. Thank you.

Sure! I can definitely elaborate on using FamilySearch for newspaper research. Let’s take a look at what it can and cannot provide you in terms of your research.

First, it’s important to remember that FamilySearch has databases, digitized items, and catalog entries. The “newspaper records” on FamilySearch are likely going to be in the form of the latter two, digitized items and catalog entries. The Catalog entries will list sources found in books or on microforms (microfilm or microfiche). So what that means is that if it’s found in a catalog entry, it will not be automatically searchable or browseable. You will need to either go to the Family History Library or one of its branches (if that’s where the item is located) to view it. You could also ask or hire someone else to view it for you. The FamilySearch Catalog also provides the option to find items in other libraries using WorldCat (more on that below).

Second, FamilySearch does not have actual newspapers. What they do have are books of indexes and abstracts. Prior to the days of digitized newspaper websites, this type of resource was invaluable to learning that an ancestor’s vital record information was printed in a newspaper. While indexes are not the best source because of the errors they can contain, they can be valuable finding aids.

FS Catalog

So let’s take a look at some examples. Let’s do a FamilySearch Catalog search for the state of North Carolina. When we do a Catalog search this is what we see in terms of the subject Newspapers.

North Carolina Newspapers

Notice that the subject categories include:

  • Newspapers
  • Newspapers - Bibliography
  • Newspapers - Indexes
  • Newspapers – Sources

But , also notice that there is also a category for Obituaries and Obituaries- indexes that also contain items from newspapers. So it’s important to go beyond just the Newspaper category.

Now, if I click on Newspapers, it expands to show me these results.

Newspapers expanded

As I look through the list I need to evaluate what looks like it might be helpful to my research. Clicking on any entry will help with that decision should the title be too generic. For the sake of our example, let’s go ahead and click on “Abstracts of births, deaths, marriages and other items of interest from Mount Airy, North Carolina newspapers."

Mount Airey Example

In this case, this is available as a book at the Library and it is not available online. So I need to figure out a way to access it.

Mount Airey Example with arrow to WorldCat

I can  check WorldCat to see if the book is available closer to where I live in Southern California. All I need to do is click on the WorldCat link (see my red arrow above). I will be redirected to the WorldCat website and a card catalog view of the book I’m looking at. If I enter my zip code the website will reveal what libraries nearest me have that item. In this case, I‘m in luck since it is at a FamilySearch Library branch about 40 miles from where I live. I can take a trip out there to look at the book and see if it has the information I need.

WorldCat example

Now, once I do that, it’s important to remember that this book was filled with abstracts, not the original newspaper articles. So I need to note the information I find and then see if I can track down the newspaper that originally published that article. Why? Because abstracts can be filled with errors.

In some cases, the Family History Library copy is the only one available.  If so, you may want to consider hiring a researcher to do a look-up, ask a friend who is going to Salt Lake for a favor, or plan your own trip.

You may get lucky and find that the item you need is digitized as in this example from North Carolina.

Digitized

I can click on the word “here” in the red sentence above and see the item I want. Please remember that in order to see digitized items you must be signed into your free FamilySearch account.

FS Digitized example 2

So FamilySearch either can provide you a way to find an ancestor in a resource via digitized books or records or they will have items in the Library, Family History Centers, or FamilySearch Libraries that you can research in person.

Not everything is online, but FamilySearch allows you to identify what you need for your research and then it's up to you to plan your next steps to acquiring it.

Thanks for the question James!

 

Gena Philibert-Ortega is an author, instructor, and researcher. She blogs at Gena's Genealogy and Food.Family.Ephemera. You can find her presentations on the Legacy Family Tree Webinars website.

 


Tuesday's Tip - Internet Toolbar (Beginner)

TT - Internet Toolbar

Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

Internet Toolbar (Beginner)

Internet Toolbar
(click image to enlarge)

 

Some users don't realize that the Web Pages Creation Tool is on the Internet Toolbar. The first five icons are the five different styles of web pages you can create.  Creating web pages is very similar to creating a report. The screens will be familiar to you. Please note that you must have your own web space on the Internet and you must use an FTP client to upload them. Some web servers have built in FTP clients but if not, we recommend the free FileZilla program. This is what we use here at Legacy. 

This isn't the only way you can do web pages. You can upload a gedcom to any of the "tree" websites. Another option is to use The Next Generation of Genealogy Site Building (TNG). You must have your own web space for this one. This is the program that the Guild of One Name Studies (GOONS) uses for their member websites. Many GOONs use Legacy. Your web space must have PHP/MySQL capability. TNG does offer web space.  

The Search the Internet is a great time saver. Legacy will auto fill in all the fields that that particular website needs. There are many default websites already programmed in for you but you can also add your own. For more information on that please consult the Help File.

Search the Internet
(click image to enlarge)

 

For some reason users miss the little down arrow next to the Find a Grave icon. There are some very useful searches here. 

Find a Grave
(click image to enlarge)

 

Next time we will take a look at the My Toolbar.

 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips check out the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis, CG® is part of the Legacy Family Tree team at MyHeritage. She handles the enhancement suggestions that come in from our users as well as writing for Legacy News. You can usually find her hanging out on the Legacy User Group Facebook page answering questions and posting tips.

 

 


Register for Webinar Wednesday - Soldier's Homes (1865-1930) Caring for our veterans by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA

Register
 
The National Home for Volunteer Soldiers, was established by an act of Congress in 1865. The purpose of the home system (initially called the National Asylum) was to provide for the care of the large number of wounded and disabled veterans from the Civil War. Records of kinship and other treasures abound in these records—over 400,000 records of these veterans are online free of charge. The home from its inception was intended to be more like a planned community of today, than a simple home and hospital. Extensive amenities and vocational training were provided. The largest branch and showpiece of the system was the Central Branch at Dayton, Ohio, Eventually growing to 11 homes or branches spread across the country, they are today Veteran’s Administration hospitals. Additionally, state and Confederate homes were established. We will also discuss strategies for finding these records.
 
Join us and Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA for the live webinar Wednesday, November 13, at 8pm eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion. 

Registerbut 

Or register for multiple webinars at once by clicking here.

Not sure if you already registered?

Login to view your registration status for this webinar (available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers).

Test Your Webinar Connection

To ensure that your webinar connection is ready to go, click here.

Can't make it to the live event?

No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA, is a long-time researcher and instructor in genealogical topics. Rick is also a retired colonel having served 31 years in the U.S. Army. Rick and his wife Pam coordinate the Advanced Land course and Researching in Washington, D.C., without Leaving Home offered by the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy (SLIG) and the Advanced Land course at Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh (GRIP). Rick co-coordinates with Judy Russell, JD, CG, CGL, the Law School for Genealogists at GRIP and the FHL Law Library course at SLIG. He also coordinates the Using Maps in Genealogy course at SLIG. Rick also instructs in the Advanced Methodology course offered by SLIG.  He also lectures at national conferences and presents nationwide seminars. His areas of expertise encompass records of the National Archives, the Bureau of Land Management, and the Daughters of the American Revolution, including military records, land records, using maps in genealogy, urban research, and government documents. Rick is experienced in the localities of western Pennsylvania and Ohio. Rick is also a trustee of the Board for Certification of Genealogists. He is also the immediate past president of BCG.

Add it to your Google Calendar

With our Google Calendar button, you will never forget our upcoming webinars. Simply click the button to add it to your calendar. You can then optionally embed the webinar events (and even turn them on and off) into your own personal calendar. If you have already added the calendar, you do not have to do it again - the new webinar events will automatically appear.

Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Wednesday, November 13, 2019 at:

  • 8pm Eastern (U.S.)
  • 7pm Central
  • 6pm Mountain
  • 5pm Pacific

Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email both 1 day and 1 hour prior to the live webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone. 

 

We look forward to seeing you all there!


New "Member Friday" Webinar - Famous DNA: Looking into the genetic history of Joseph Smith Jr. by Ugo Perego, PhD

New "Member Friday" Webinar - Famous DNA: Looking into the genetic history of Joseph Smith Jr. by Ugo Perego, PhD

Every Friday we're pleased to offer Legacy Family Tree Webinar subscribers a new bonus webinar just for them! This Friday enjoy "Famous DNA: Looking into the genetic history of Joseph Smith Jr., founder of Mormonism" by Ugo Perego, PhD. 

Famous DNA: Looking into the genetic history of Joseph Smith Jr., founder of Mormonism

This is a review of nearly 20 years of research work about Joseph Smith Jr. and his family using DNA tools. This case study is also helpful to see DNA in action and how it
can be applied to anyone's own personal family history research. It includes Y chromosome testing to trace both the origin of this particular Smith family and issues regarding alleged posterity; mitochondrial DNA to learn about their ancient maternal origins; and a unique, more than 180 years old paternity case using autosomal DNA.

Famous DNA: Looking into the genetic history of Joseph Smith Jr. by Ugo Perego, PhD


_WatchVideo

About the Presenter

Ugo Perego PhDDr. Ugo A. Perego is the owner of the Genetic Genealogy Consultant services, which specializes in helping genealogists with all their DNA needs. He is also a visiting scientist affiliated with the DNA laboratory of Professors Alessandro Achilli and Antonio Torroni at the University of Pavia in Italy, working on human population genetics. He has previously worked for more than a decade as a senior researcher with the Sorenson Molecular Genealogy Foundation and GeneTree.com both based in Utah. Ugo earned a BSc and an MSc in Health Sciences at Brigham Young University (Provo, Utah) and a PhD in Genetic and Biomolecular Sciences at the University of Pavia, Italy. Ugo has contributed numerous lectures and publications on DNA and its applications to population genetics, genealogy, ancestry, forensics, and history. With his family he currently resides in Rome, Italy.

See all the webinars by Ugo Perego in the Legacy library.
 
Not a member yet?

Legacy Family Tree Webinars provides genealogy education where-you-are through live and recorded online webinars and videos. Learn from the best instructors in genealogy including Thomas MacEntee, Judy Russell, J. Mark Lowe, Lisa Louise Cooke, Megan Smolenyak, Tom Jones, and many more. Learn at your convenience. On-demand classes are available 24 hours a day! All you need is a computer or mobile device with an Internet connection.

Subscribe today and get access to this BONUS members-only webinar AND all of this:

  • All 1,056 classes in the library (1,337 hours of quality genealogy education)
  • 4,570 pages of instructors' handouts
  • Chat logs from the live webinars
  • Additional 5% off anything at FamilyTreeWebinars.com
  • Chance for a bonus subscribers-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Additional members-only webinars

It's just $49.95/year.


Navigating Newspaper Research

Newspapers-post

You know newspaper research is important to your family history. It can uncover everything from vital record information to the casual mention of your ancestor's daily life. So go research newspapers! But, is it really that easy? Which website should you  use? If it’s a subscription website, which one should you invest in? It’s the one question I  always get when I give presentations about newspaper research. And my answer is always, “I don’t know.”

Here’s the reason I don’t know. It's not that I don't know what websites exist with digitized newspaper collections.  I don't know which one specifically will be beneficial to your research. Yes, I could recommend a website or two based on my own  research. However, the website’s usefulness depends on the location and time period you are researching. You will want to make sure that the subscription website you choose has the newspapers for the places and time periods that you are researching.

Options for historical newspaper collections are numerous. And they are not all online (but you knew that, right?).

When we are doing newspaper research your may find that a newspaper is:

  • In a physical form, bound and archived at a library
  • Available as images on a microfilm
  • Transcribed/abstracted/indexed  and available in a book 
  • Transcribed/abstracted/ indexed on a website (for example, GenDisasters)
  • Digitized on a subscription website (genealogy or newspaper website)
  • Digitized on a free website (local library, for example)
  • Not extant (destroyed or not archived)

Finding Aids

So where should you start? Start by seeking out finding aids.

Having so many options for historical newspaper content is great but the difficulty lies in finding the newspapers and the websites that you need for your research.

A few online finding aids to assist you are:

The website Chronicling America, in addition to offering digitized newspapers, also has a US Newspaper Directory, 1690 to the Present (rectangular pink button found at the top right of the website) that allows you to search by place or title to find historical newspapers. 

Newspaper Subscription Websites

Numerous subscription based digitized newspaper websites exist including:

As you explore what various digitized newspaper websites have to offer, it’s important to remember that they are consistently adding to their offerings, so you will need to check back periodically to see if they have the newspapers you need.

As you explore the websites mentioned above, see what newspapers and dates are covered by each website. For example, on the GenealogyBank website you can, at the top toolbar, click on Browse and then search newspapers by state, title or date. 

Don't forget that larger public academic libraries have subscriptions to digitized newspaper websites that are not available to individuals. I highly recommend you look on your local university library's website and see what subscription websites they offer. Most likely they have something that can be of use to you.

Genealogy  Websites

Some genealogy websites also have digitized newspapers or newspaper abstracts including:

Now, you’ll notice FamilySearch is not on the above list. FamilySearch doesn’t have newspapers per se but they still should be searched. Check the FamilySearch Catalog  first. You can search by the Place your ancestor lived in and then the category Newspapers.

FS catalog

Notice that a Catalog Keyword search for the term Newspapers brought up more than 15,000 results.

FS Catalog Newspapers

Most of these results are abstracts which can help you easily locate a mention of an ancestor which can then lead you to the actual newspaper. Finally, use the FamilySearch Research Wiki to locate information on Newspapers for your location of interest.

FS Wiki

Free Newspaper Websites

There are also numerous free digitized newspaper websites including:

So What Should You Do?

I don’t know what’s best for you and your research but what I do know is there are many online options and becoming acquainted with them can help you make the best decision. But you must also remember that not everything is or will ever be online. So after you explore the above options, consult the library catalog for the area you are researching to inquire about collections. If you don’t see what you’re looking for, call or email. My local library has  microfilmed copies of a local newspaper however, you would never find that in their online catalog. When I asked why, I was simply told they didn’t know. So always, reach out to librarians and archivists to learn more.

Learn more about newspaper research from these webinars in the Legacy library.

 

Gena Philibert-Ortega is an author, instructor, and researcher. She blogs at Gena's Genealogy and Food.Family.Ephemera. You can find her presentations on the Legacy Family Tree Webinars website.

 


Understanding Ethnicity Estimates - free webinar by Mary Eberle, JD, now online for limited time

2019-11-06-image500blog-ethnicity

The recording of today's webinar, "Understanding Ethnicity Estimates” by Mary Eberle, JD, is now available to view at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com for free for a limited time.

Webinar Description

Learn how and when ethnicity estimates can be useful. Several case studies where ethnicity estimates helped solve the genealogy mystery will be covered. This talk covers: 1. How ethnicity estimates are generated and the ancestral timeframe they reflect 2. Differences between the DNA testing companies 3. Additional tools to further explore ethnicity estimates 4. How to identify situations in which they can be very helpful 5. Several examples where ethnicity estimates helped solve a genealogy mystery will be covered.
 
View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 21 minute recording of "Understanding Ethnicity Estimates" is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. If you have a webinar membership, it is available anytime.

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 1,055 classes, 1,335 hours of genealogy education)
  • On-demand access to the instructor handouts (now 4,570 pages)
  • On-demand access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Chance for a members-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
  • Ability to view which webinars you are registered for
  • Use of the playlist, resume watching, and jump-to features

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year

Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

Soldier's Homes (1865-1930) Caring for our veterans 11/13/2019

Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA

Native American Research: Things You May Not Know 11/19/2019

Paula Stuart-Warren, CG, FMGS, FUGA

MyHeritage's SuperSearch (German) 11/20/2019

Silvia da Silva

A la Karte: Borders, Maps and Gazetteers for German Genealogists 11/20/2019

James M. Beidler

No Will? No Problem! 11/22/2019

Sharon Monson

MyHeritage: les fonctionnalités à utiliser absolument (French) 11/25/2019

Elisabeth Zetland

Genealogie voor beginners: hoe start ik mijn familiestamboom op MyHeritage? (Dutch) 11/25/2019

Willeke Binnendijk

MyHeritage DNA - en oversikt (Norwegian) 11/26/2019

Yael Beck

I Received DNA Matches, Now What? 11/26/2019

Daniel Horowitz

Buried Treasures: What's in the English Parish Chest 12/3/2019

Paul Milner

Marriages Here, There, and Nowhere: Finding Gretna Greens and Borders 12/17/2019

J. Mark Lowe, CG, FUGA

Print the 2019 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


Trove: An Australian and Beyond Genealogical Treasure - free webinar by Helen V. Smith now online for limited time

Trove: An Australian and Beyond Genealogical Treasure - free webinar by Helen V. Smith now online for limited time

The recording of the Down Under webinar, "Trove: An Australian and Beyond Genealogical Treasure” by Helen V. Smith, is now available to view at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com for free for a limited time.

Webinar Description

Australia (and the rest of the world) is very fortunate to have free access to Trove - a website of the National Library of Australia. Trove contains many digitised newspapers, some from all the Australian States and Territories up to 1954. While not every paper ever printed has been digitised there is a wide selection. The Trove site is not just newspapers but also has Picture Australia, theses, maps, and now the New South Wales and Commonwealth Government Gazettes. There are a number of ways to make your search more directed and ways to organise your research using the site.
 
View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 13 minute recording of "Trove: An Australian and Beyond Genealogical Treasure" is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. 

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 1,054 classes, 1,334 hours of genealogy education)
  • On-demand access to the instructor handouts (now 4,570 pages)
  • On-demand access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Chance for a members-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
  • Ability to view which webinars you are registered for
  • Use of the playlist, resume watching, and jump-to features

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year

Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

Understanding Ethnicity Estimates 11/6/2019

Mary Eberle, JD

Soldier's Homes (1865-1930) Caring for our veterans 11/13/2019

Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA

Native American Research: Things You May Not Know 11/19/2019

Paula Stuart-Warren, CG, FMGS, FUGA

MyHeritage's SuperSearch (German) 11/20/2019

Silvia da Silva

A la Karte: Borders, Maps and Gazetteers for German Genealogists 11/20/2019

James M. Beidler

No Will? No Problem! 11/22/2019

Sharon Monson

MyHeritage: les fonctionnalités à utiliser absolument (French) 11/25/2019

Elisabeth Zetland

Genealogie voor beginners: hoe start ik mijn familiestamboom op MyHeritage? (Dutch) 11/25/2019

Willeke Binnendijk

MyHeritage DNA - en oversikt (Norwegian) 11/26/2019

Yael Beck

I Received DNA Matches, Now What? 11/26/2019

Daniel Horowitz

Buried Treasures: What's in the English Parish Chest 12/3/2019

Paul Milner

Marriages Here, There, and Nowhere: Finding Gretna Greens and Borders 12/17/2019

J. Mark Lowe, CG, FUGA

Print the 2019 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


Register for Webinar Wednesday: Understanding Ethnicity Estimates by Mary Eberle, JD

Register
 
Learn how and when ethnicity estimates can be useful. Several case studies where ethnicity estimates helped solve the genealogy mystery will be covered. This talk covers: 1. How ethnicity estimates are generated and the ancestral timeframe they reflect 2. Differences between the DNA testing companies 3. Additional tools to further explore ethnicity estimates 4. How to identify situations in which they can be very helpful 5. Several examples where ethnicity estimates helped solve a genealogy mystery will be covered.
 
Join us and Mary Eberle, JD for the live webinar Wednesday, November 6, at 2pm eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion. 

Registerbut 

Or register for multiple webinars at once by clicking here.

Not sure if you already registered?

Login to view your registration status for this webinar (available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers).

Test Your Webinar Connection

To ensure that your webinar connection is ready to go, click here.

Can't make it to the live event?

No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

MaryEberle-144x144Mary Eberle is a DNA expert who founded DNA Hunters,® LLC in 2015. She is also an educator, an international speaker, and the author of “23 Best Tips for DNA Testing and Family History.”  Mary is a retired patent attorney with extensive DNA experience. Over 30 years ago, she began her scientific career. She developed DNA tests for transplant patients. Today, she leads the DNA Hunters team, which finds people’s biological parent and grandparents. 

Add it to your Google Calendar

With our Google Calendar button, you will never forget our upcoming webinars. Simply click the button to add it to your calendar. You can then optionally embed the webinar events (and even turn them on and off) into your own personal calendar. If you have already added the calendar, you do not have to do it again - the new webinar events will automatically appear.

Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Wednesday, November 6, 2019 at:

  • 2pm Eastern (U.S.)
  • 1pm Central
  • 12pm Mountain
  • 11am Pacific

Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email both 1 day and 1 hour prior to the live webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone. 

 

We look forward to seeing you all there!


Tuesday's Tip - Search Toolbar (Beginner)

TT - Search Toolbar

Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

 

Search Toolbar
(click image to enlarge)

 

There are several things I want to point out on the Search Toolbar because these searches are very different from each other. Find brings up the internal Search screen. Make sure you click on all of the tabs to see all of the different searches you can do. Find Next will bring you to the next person on your EXISTING Search List. Find Previous will take you to the previous person on your EXISTING Search List. Census List is a specialized search with many applications, not just census searches. If you click the Find button you will also see the Census List here as one of the tabs. Search List will bring up your EXISTING Search List

Search Replace is where you will search a specific field for a specific value and replace it with something else. Search Internet has a list of default genealogy webpage searches and Legacy will fill in the search criteria for you. You can also add your own websites to this list (see the Help File). 

FamilySearch will open up the FamilySearch interface screen where you can do a direct sync. 

Find a Grave has a sub menu which users tend to miss for some reason. There are some great time saving searches here. 

Find a Grave
(click image to enlarge)

 

The Search Hashtags will let you create a Search List of people using a specific Hashtag which you can then further manipulate. You can use the Windows CTRL command to select multiple Hashtags at once. You can also use the Windows Shift command to select all of them.

 

Next time we will look at the Internet Toolbar.

 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips check out the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis, CG® is part of the Legacy Family Tree team at MyHeritage. She handles the enhancement suggestions that come in from our users as well as writing for Legacy News. You can usually find her hanging out on the Legacy User Group Facebook page answering questions and posting tips.


Register for our next Down Under webinar - Trove: An Australian and Beyond Genealogical Treasure by Helen V. Smith

Register-downunder
 
Australia (and the rest of the world), is very fortunate to have free access to Trove - a website of the National Library of Australia. Trove contains many digitised newspapers, some from all the Australian States and Territories up to 1954. While not every paper ever printed has been digitsed there is a wide selection. But the Trove site is not just newspapers but also has Picture Australia, theses, maps, and now the New South Wales and Commonwealth Government Gazettes. There are a number of ways to make your search more directed and ways to organise your research using the site.
 
Join us and Helen V. Smith for the live webinar Tuesday, November 5, at 8pm eastern U.S. (which is Wednesday, November 6 at 12pm Sydney time). Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion. 

Registerbut 

Or register for multiple webinars at once by clicking here.

Not sure if you already registered?

Login to view your registration status for this webinar (available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers).

Test Your Webinar Connection

To ensure that your webinar connection is ready to go, click here.

Can't make it to the live event?

No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

HelenSmith-144x144Helen has been researching her family since 1986 with research in Australia, England, Wales and Ireland. She is the author of Death Certificates and Archaic Medical Terms and Google the Genealogist’s Friend and has written for a number of family history as well as scientific publications. Helen has a One Name Study on Quested. Helen has spoken to a wide variety of audiences nationally and internationally. She is a member of the Association of Professional Genealogists and the Genealogical Speakers Guild. Professionally, she is a Molecular Epidemiologist specializing in Public Health Microbiology and has a strong interest in infectious diseases and Public Health through the ages.

Add it to your Google Calendar

With our Google Calendar button, you will never forget our upcoming webinars. Simply click the button to add it to your calendar. You can then optionally embed the webinar events (and even turn them on and off) into your own personal calendar. If you have already added the calendar, you do not have to do it again - the new webinar events will automatically appear.

Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Tuesday, November 5, 2019 at:

  • 8pm Eastern (U.S.)
  • 7pm Central
  • 6pm Mountain
  • 5pm Pacific

which in Sydney is Wednesday, November 6, 2019 at:

  • 12pm

Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email both 1 day and 1 hour prior to the live webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone. 

 

We look forward to seeing you all there!


Free Legacy Family Tree update now available (version 9.0.0.332)

We have another great new update for our Legacy Family Tree 9 users (free) to download. It's mostly a maintenance update which provides fixes to minor issues you have reported to us. It is a mandatory update for those wanting to continue using the LegacyFamilySearch tool. So download the update to get the best Legacy ever!

See the download instructions below for step-by-step instructions on installing this update. 

What's Been Fixed

View the October 28 release notes here. 

How to Update

For our Deluxe Edition users, all you have to do is connect to the Internet, start Legacy 9, and click on the "Install and Download Now" link on the Legacy Home tab. (If you're reading this from within the Legacy Home tab inside of Legacy 9, you'll first need to click on the Home button in the top left of the Legacy Home tab which looks like the following picture:

12-2-2013 9-36-15 AM

If you are a Standard Edition Legacy user, you will need to visit our website. Go to http://www.legacyfamilytree.com/DownloadUpdate.asp and follow the instructions.


Newspaper Skill Challenge Answers

SkillChallengeAnswers

Here are the answers (below the article) to last week's skill challenge.

The following fun newspaper article appeared in the Providence Evening Press on 29 April 1870.

Read the following story and see if you can answer the questions. You will have to do some detective work (ie. research) to find out the answers. In addition to answering the questions, determine what type of records would provide answers to the questions and where you will start. Also, are there any other clues in the article that would lead you to more information about this family? Because the type did not render well, the name of the town where the family lives is Somerville.

House Break In Providence Evening Gazette-1870-04-29 p3
Click to Enlarge     
The Providence Evening Press, 29 April 1870, p. 3, col. 5; digital image, MyHeritage.com (https://www.myheritage.com/research/record-10620-519702/the-providence-evening-press?s=282563811 : accessed 24 October 2019), Rhode Island Newspapers, 1778-1938.                                                                    

Questions

What state is Somerville in? How do you know from the context of the article?

Somerville is in Massachusetts. We know this because of the notation at the very end of the article "-Boston Traveller." That indicates that the Providence Evening Press published an article originally from the Boston Traveller.

What is the full street address of the Gurney family? List one document you can use to find out. Extra credit for each additional type of document that will provide the same information.

I'm revising this answer because, frankly, I got it wrong the first time. In my original answer I looked at the wrong column in the 1880 census. I think it's a good lesson to show that a genealogist can be wrong. Even when we try really hard not to be! If you look at something too long sometimes you can't see what's right in front of you anymore. Revised answer below.

This article was published in 1870. The US Federal Census of 1870 did not include street names or street numbers. The 1880 Federal Census did not list a street number even though it was an option on the census. The enumerator did not fill it in or perhaps there were no street numbers (but that seems unlikely to me in a busy city). While the property was still in the hands of the Gurney family in 1900 no one in the family is listed as living there at that time.

Henry Gurney is found more often in Boston, Massachusetts city directories listing his place of work with a brief  mention that his home is in Somverille. However, the 1875  City Directory of Somerville, Massachusetts has the following listing:

"Gurney Henry L., pilot, house Cedar, cor. Highland av." 

The 1873 Somerville City Directory has the same listing.

That description is very helpful because very often streets are renumbered over the years. That means that 72 Cedar Street in 1870 would not necesseary be the same house/lot as 72 Cedar Street today. But with the description of the house being located at the corner of Highland Cedar we can narrow down the location much easier.

Another place you could find the address is in the deed. FamilySearch.org holds many land records from Massachusetts. A quick search shows that Henry Gurney purchased the property from William Gates in April 1866.  The property is described in the index as "Somerville Cedar formly [sic.] Leland St. + Cedar St." This demonstrates once again that street locations and their names have been very fluid through time. You can view the original deed here (requires login with free account): https://tinyurl.com/y4hkfw8l

What are the names of the daughters who were at home that night?

The 1870 US Federal Census indicates that the most likely candidates for the two daughters are Emily, age 28, and Catherine, age 20. The article describes the girls as "...two daughters, one a young lady of about twenty years of age and the other about fourteen years of age..." This is a good reminder that not only can the information be wrong in the census but it could be wrong in newspaper articles as well. Other documents such as birth, marriage and death records would give a better indication of the daughters' true ages.

Who are the other people in the family not mentioned?

Again, we turn to the 1870 US Federal Census and find that wife, Mary Gurney, and son, Henry Gurney, were not mentioned in the newspaper article. It's a mystery where they were and why they were not home that night or why they were not mentioned in the article. There is an additional daughter, Beatrice, not mentioned in the 1870 census but found in the earlier 1860 US Federal Census.

Henry Gurney Family 1870
1870 US Federal Census showing household of Henry Gurney and family, Somerville, Massachusetts. MyHeritage.com

What does en deshabille mean? Why would a newspaper use the French phrase instead of English?

The phrase en deshabille means "in a state of undress" according to the online Merriam-Webster Dictionary.  As this was during the Victorian Era it would likely have seemed improper to talk about young ladies in their night clothes. The French phrase provides a precise description of the situation without the risk of appearing improper.

What was the occupation of Henry L. Gurney? From that, what can we guess he was doing in Washington?

From the 1870 (and other)  US Federal Census we learn that Henry Gurney was a "Pilot." City Directories and other documents show that he was a pilot at Lewis Wharf in Boston, a center for merchants and commerce.  If we were to guess what Henry Gurney was doing in Washington, I would say that he was perhaps piloting his boat to pick up merchandise for sale at Lewis Wharf or perhaps droppoing off goods for sale in Washington.

 

Extra Credit:

How would you find out if the same house is standing today?

The first thing I would do answer this question is to look at Google maps and use the street view to see what is at the location now. Even though the street numbers likely have changed we know the house was as the corner of Cedar Street and Highland Avenue (which exact corner is the question!). Doing that indicates that three of the corners have newer commercial buildings on them. The fourth corner contains a yoga studio on the first floor of a building that could have existed in 1870. A quick Google search shows that the address of yoga studio is at 288 Highland Ave., Somerville, MA 02143. Using that address I would access the City of Somerville's Assessor Database in order to see when the building was built. It indicates that building at that location was built in 1920. However, older buildings are not always dated correctly in Massachusetts assessor databases so a 1920 date would not be conclusive.

To resolve the issue of "which corner" quickly, you could look at some historic maps such as cadastral maps (also known as land ownership maps) or Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps. An 1895 street map of Somerville shows the Gurney property on the southwest corner of Highland and Cedar. The yoga property, currently on the southeast corner, is therefore not the same property. Since all the other buildings currently at that intersection are new we can say that the Gurney property is no longer standing.

Interestingly enough, the 1895 map shows that the Gurneys owned a large 2+ acre property at that location, in contrast to many much smaller house lots it was surrounded by. It would be fun to research and discover when the Gurney property was broken up.

 

Marian Pierre-Louis is a genealogy professional who specializes in educational outreach through webinars, internet broadcasts and video. Her areas of expertise include house history research, southern New England research and solving brick walls. Marian is the Online Education Producer for Legacy Family Tree Webinars where she produces online genealogy education classes. Once a month you'll find her as the evening host of Legacy Family Tree Webinars. Check out her webinars in the Legacy library.


Top 10 Genealogy Webinars - October 2019

Top10-new

We've tallied the numbers and made a list of the Top 10 FamilyTreeWebinars.com classes for October 2019! Are your favorite topics or instructors among the list? Need something new to learn? Use the list to get inspired!

Each month thousands of Legacy Family Tree Webinar subscribers head for the library to learn new skills and techniques to help improve their genealogy research. Among the now-1,053 genealogy classes in the members-only library, these were the most frequently played during the month of October 2019.  They aren't necessarily the newest classes but rather the topics that were sought out by our members.

Have you seen any of these classes? Are these among your favorites too? Some of these classes (and topics) might be new to you! Get inspired to learn more and make your genealogy journey more fun!

The Top 10 for October 2019

1. 50 Records that Document Female Ancestors by Gena Philibert-Ortega

2. The Stories Behind the Segments by Blaine Bettinger, Ph.D., J.D.

3. A Day Out With Your DNA by Diahan Southard

4. Discover the new Legacy Family Tree 9 by Geoff Rasmussen

5. An Introduction to DNA Painter by Jonny Perl

6. Ahnenforschung für Anfänger (German) by Andrea Bentschneider

7. Privacy: How to Protect Your Information Online by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL

8. The Home Archivist: Preserving Family Records Like a Pro! by Melissa Barker

9. Slektsforskning for nybegynnere: Etabler ditt online slektstre (Norwegian) by Yael Beck

10. MyHeritage DNA - Et overblik (Danish) by Ilan Melchior

The Runner-Ups

11. Civil Law Records in Genealogical Research: Notarial Records by Claire Bettag, CG

12. Reasonably Exhaustive Research: The First Criteria for Genealogical Proof by Elizabeth Shown Mills, CG, CGL

13. Decoding Secret Societies: Finding Your Female Fraternal Ancestors by Michael L. Strauss, AG

14. Before Statehood: Virginia, Fincastle and Kentucky Records by J. Mark Lowe, CG, FUGA

15. TRIBAL QUEST: The Latest Expedition by Golan Levi

16. Italian Civil Registration (Stato Civile): Going Beyond the Basics by Melanie D. Holtz, CG

17. Decoding Secret Societies: Finding Your Male Fraternal Ancestors by Michael L. Strauss, AG

18. What Exactly Is a Centimorgan? by Ran Snir

19. Seven Steps to Manage Digital Files by Denise May Levenick

20. Meaningful Tables and Graphs for Correlation in Family History by Ruth Wilson Craig, CG

 

Access to classes in the Legacy Family Tree Webinar library are available with an webinar membership. Not a member? Become one! Or watch one of our free classes here.


New "Member Friday" Webinars - Underground Railroad and Black Loyalists by Janice Lovelace

New "Member Friday" Webinars - Underground Railroad and Black Loyalists by Janice Lovelace

Every Friday we're pleased to offer Legacy Family Tree Webinar subscribers a new bonus webinar just for them! This Friday enjoy two webinars "The (Underground) Railroad Runs Through Here" and "Researching Black Loyalist Communities in Canada" by Janice Lovelace, PhD. 

The (Underground) Railroad Runs Through Here

The Underground Railroad was a loosely organized way to assist people to leave enslavement in the South and find freedom in the Northern U.S. or in Canada. Do you have ancestors that might have been involved in the Underground Railroad? How do you find records of those who were involved?

The (Underground) Railroad Runs Through Here


_WatchVideo

Researching Black Loyalist Communities in Canada

Thousands of Black people (primarily men) fought on both sides of the Revolutionary War – as Patriots and Loyalists – hoping that freedom from slavery would come with the end of the war. This session looks at those who fought with the British - Black Loyalists. Who were they and what happened to them after the war when they fled to Canada? Learn where to locate records to find out more about the people and their communities.

Researching Black Loyalist Communities in Canada


_WatchVideo


About the Presenter

Janice Lovelace PhDJanice Lovelace is a genealogical researcher, educator, author, and lecturer, with over thirty years of experience. She completed the Genealogy and Family History certificate at the University of Washington in 2012, the certificate program in genealogy at Boston University in 2013, and ProGen in 2014. Dr. Lovelace is a frequent speaker at international, national, and regional genealogy conferences as well as local societies on health and genetics, ethnic minority genealogy, and research methodology. She is an instructor at the Midwest African American Genealogical Institute (MAAGI). A retired college faculty member, Dr. Lovelace authored the National Genealogical Society’s online continuing education course African American Roots: A Historical Perspective. A freelance writer and photographer, she has a number of genealogy articles among her publications. A member of the Seattle Genealogical Society for many years, she has served in several board positions. She is also a member of Association of Professional Genealogists (APG), the Ohio Genealogical Society, Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society (AAHGS), and the National Genealogical Society (NGS).

See all the webinars by Janice Lovelace in the Legacy library.
 
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Legacy Family Tree Webinars provides genealogy education where-you-are through live and recorded online webinars and videos. Learn from the best instructors in genealogy including Thomas MacEntee, Judy Russell, J. Mark Lowe, Lisa Louise Cooke, Megan Smolenyak, Tom Jones, and many more. Learn at your convenience. On-demand classes are available 24 hours a day! All you need is a computer or mobile device with an Internet connection.

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