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Beyond the obituary: researching your ancestors in newspapers

by Gena Philibert Ortega (used with permission):

As genealogists, we turn to historic newspapers to find vital record information on our ancestors. Newspapers are great sources for birth announcements, reports of wedding anniversaries and the infamous obituary. But thorough newspaper research is so much more than just searching for vital record information. Newspapers provide us with details of life’s joys (births, weddings, accomplishments, milestones) and the more somber moments (deaths, accidents, court trials) as well as the day-to-day happenings (advertisements, Letters to the Editor, gossip columns).

Digitized newspapers provide us with the ease of finding articles that prior to the Internet took long hours of searching and scanning reels of microfilm. Even after putting in the necessary hours bent over the microfilm machine it was still easy to miss mentions of an ancestor. Now with GenealogyBank, finding your family is as easy as typing their name into a search engine.

So what are some of the articles that you might find your ancestor in? Consider some of the following examples that prove with a little time and effort you can piece together the story of your ancestor’s life

Advertisements
Did your ancestor own a business or provide a service to the community?  You may want to search the local newspapers of your ancestor’s community for advertisements heralding their business.

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Aside from information about an ancestor’s business, advertisements allow you to reconstruct the community your ancestor lived in. Advertisements can help you determine possible records and manuscript collections that may exist. An advertisement for a physician provides you the information you need to search for records left behind by that doctor that in turn may mention your ancestor and their family.

Ancestor Wanted by the Law
Did your ancestor find themselves on the wrong side of the law? Maybe a few indiscretions caused them to be mentioned in the newspaper. While a crime may warrant a front page article, don’t forget to look for other types of articles about subsequent criminal trials, police blotters, arrest reports and even advertisements. Consider the following advertisement published in the Alta California from September 1850.

News9

While not flattering to the accused it does provides a useful physical description (hazel eyes, black hair, fair complexion, 5’9 ½ inches and 26 years old) along with a perceived characteristic (“a man much embarrassed when spoken to”).  In this case, more research would be needed to see if any additional articles mentioned him in future newspaper editions.

Organizational Memberships
Our ancestors loved to join clubs and social groups. Just as today, membership in social and fraternal organizations provided a sense of belonging and in some cases other benefits. While not all membership records are archived, you may have luck learning more about an organization, and possibly a mention of your ancestor, in the newspaper.

The Women’s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) is one such club that your female ancestor may have belonged to. The WCTU was organized in 1874 out of a concern that the abuse of alcohol had negative effects on individual families and society.

Mentions of the WCTU can be found in numerous articles in newspapers throughout the United States. Coverage of the WCTU included everything from protests to articles by members about temperance.

This short article about the WCTU national elections illustrates the importance of conducting searches of your ancestor’s name without a specific locality. Notice that this article includes the names of the women elected and their residence. This Phoenix, Arizona newspaper includes the names of three newly elected offices in the WCTU who are from Maine, Kentucky and Missouri. One of the benefits of having access to digitized newspapers is the ability to search an ancestor’s name and finding hits for that name in newspapers all over the United States.

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(17 November 1898, Weekly Phoenix Herald)

About Town
Imagine if your local newspaper reported on where you went shopping today or who you had lunch with yesterday. While today we have social networking tools like Facebook to report on our comings and goings, 19th  and 20th century small towns had the newspaper.

These reports often provide information ranging from where a person traveled to, where they shopped, visitors they welcomed, who was ill, or who came to the funeral. These mentions can provide important details to your family history. For example, knowing that a person was ill a week prior to death provides insight into the information found on a death certificate.

The following report from Omaha World Herald (Nebraska) describes the happenings in the Council Bluffs area. Notice that these reports include vital record information, including two funerals and a birth. This is also were you might find mention of an ancestor who has since left town.

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10 December 1906, Omaha World Herald

Letters to the Editor
Our ancestors appear in all parts of the newspaper as articles documented their lives. In some cases, they were not written about but instead were the ones writing. Our ancestors wrote letters that were published in the Letters to the Editor section of their local newspaper. Having an ancestor who penned such a letter is like learning more about their thoughts and beliefs. Letters to the Editor feature reader’s commentary on political and social happenings as well as announcements of interest to the local community.

While the majority of Letters to the Editor are from community members to their local newspaper, in some cases letters may have appeared in other newspapers as well. This following letter appeared in the 18 October 1916 Oregonian; it originated from a Oregonian native who had relocated to Canada. Her letter is especially interesting because she names other people, talks about where she was born, gives her father’s name and then a history of a local Canadian river. While not all Letters to the Editor have so much genealogical detail, they will provide you insight into the life of your ancestor.

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As you search the newspaper for your ancestor, remember that Letters to the Editor may be signed by more than one citizen, signed as an individual or signed with an alias.

As you search newspapers for your ancestors, remember the rich diversity of articles that might mention them and the events of their lives. Aside from just searching on your ancestor’s name, learning more about the history and the locality they lived in from the newspaper of the time also are valuable resources in piecing together our ancestor’s lives.  Search historical newspapers today and see what genealogical treasures are in store for you.

Huge Historical Newspaper Archive at GenealogyBank.com
One of the key sources for online newspapers is GenealogyBank.com. By providing access to rare and hard-to-find newspapers from 1690 to the present day, GenealogyBank gives researchers the opportunity to discover unique, long-forgotten information about their American ancestors.

Featuring more than 5,000 U.S. newspapers with over 1 billion names from all 50 states, GenealogyBank is one of the most extensive online historical newspaper archives available anywhere, designed specifically for family history research. Over 95% of our newspaper content is exclusive to GenealogyBank.

Special Offer for Legacy Family Tree users – Join Now and Save 25%!
For a limited time, annual memberships are at their most affordable if you join before May 31st, 2011.  For only $4.37 per month, you’ll save over 25% off the annual subscription (Now $52.46 – Was $69.95). 

You can also subscribe by phone 1-866-223-8535 (M-F 9am-5pm MST) and mention product code 1105L1. There’s never been a better time to explore your family history. You are just a few clicks away from fascinating facts and stories from your family’s past.

SAVE 25% and Get Unlimited Searches – Expires May 31st!


Register for our free webinar - Google Docs for Genealogists

Learn how to use Google Docs - a free application complete with spreadsheets, word processing and more - to your advantage while performing genealogy research. We'll cover how to create new documents, import documents from your hard drive, and how to use the basic functions of each component.

Join webinar host Geoff Rasmussen and speaker Thomas MacEntee (author of Google for Genealogists, Backing Up Your Genealogy Data, Building a Research Toolbox, and Dropbox for Genealogists) for this 90-minute free webinar, Google Docs for Genealogists.

The live webinar is scheduled for Wednesday, May 18, 2011, so register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free.

Registerbut 

About the presenter

ThomasMacentee-small Thomas MacEntee is a professional genealogist specializing in the use of technology and social media to improve genealogical research and as a means of interacting with others in the family history community. Utilizing over 25 years of experience in the information technology field, Thomas writes and lectures on the many ways in which blogs, Facebook and Twitter can be leveraged to add new dimensions to the genealogy experience. As the creator of GeneaBloggers.com he has organized and engaged a community of over 1,800 bloggers to document their own journeys in the search for ancestors.

Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Wednesday, May 18, 2011 at:

  • 2pm Eastern (U.S.)
  • 1pm Central
  • 12pm Mountain
  • 11am Pacific/Arizona
  • 6pm GMT

Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.LegacyFamilyTree.com/webinars.asp today. It's free!
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email during the week prior to the webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  6. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone.

We look forward to seeing you all there!

Other upcoming webinars

Wednesday, May 18, 2011. Google Docs for Genealogists with Thomas MacEntee. Register here.

Wednesday, June 1, 2011. Google Forms for Genealogists with Thomas MacEntee. Register here.

Wednesday, June 29, 2011. Ready, Set, Write! Share Your Family's Story with Lisa Alzo. Register here.

Wednesday, July 13, 2011. The Power of DNA in Unlocking Family Relationships with Ugo Perego. Register here.

Wednesday, July 20, 2011. Google Images and Beyond with Maureen Taylor. Register here.

Wednesday, August 3, 2011. Organizing for Success with Karen Clifford. Register here.

View past webinars

Our webinars are available in the archives at www.LegacyFamilyTree.com/webinars.asp for at least 10 days. Select webinars are now available to purchase on CD for $9.95 each:


Free webinar now online - Genealogy Charts

Janetprofessional-small Janet Hovorka really exceeded my expectations in today's webinar - not that I had low expectations, but I thought I knew what there was to know about genealogy charts. She really opened the audiences' eyes to what you can do with genealogy charts. My congratulations to her for a fine webinar. And congratulations to the eight door prize winners today!

View the recording

If you could not make it to the live event, the 1 hour 26 minute recording of Further Your Research and Unify Your Family Reunion with Beautiful Genealogy Charts is now available to view in our webinar archives. Visit www.LegacyFamilyTree.com/webinars.asp to watch.

Visit http://Legacy.generationmaps.com to explore all of the charting possibilities Janet talked about.

Special discount coupon

The special discount coupon of charts that was announced during the webinar is valid for anything in our online store through Monday, May 16, 2011.

Viewers' comments

  • Excellent presentation! Very interesting looks for showcasing your family history! I have enjoyed every webinar I have attended so far! Very professional!
  • Opened my eyes to lots of great ways to share with my family.
  • I've never printed any of my charts...now when I look at them I can really see the holes! So much work to do! Thank you...I look forward to a new realm in my genealogical searching!
  • Janet is a delightful person to listen to.  I had never thought about charts, but now am interested in making one/some.  I especially like the fact that you can make a working chart so you can see everyone you have and can try to fill in the blanks before ordering a really good chart that you want to frame.
  • Now I really want a chart. Thanks for showing the couple bowtie!
  • This webinar really got my research juices going as I want to get a chart made before our reunion in summer of 2012.
  • Wonderful Webinar, Janet and Geoff. Many thanks for the precise and uplifting information and many beautiful chart examples displayed and discussed. Really enjoyed the question/answer segment too... always enlightening. It's years since I created A3 Wall Charts for family (the original of which has pride of place in my Office/Family room) so I'm inspired to get creating again!

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • Google Docs for Genealogists with Thomas MacEntee - Wednesday, May 18, 2011
  • Google Forms for Genealogists with Thomas MacEntee - Wednesday, June 1, 2011.
  • Ready, Set, Write! Share Your Family's Story with Lisa Alzo - Wednesday, June 29, 2011
  • The Power of DNA in Unlocking Family Relationships with Ugo Perego - Wednesday, July 13, 2011
  • Google Images and Beyond with Maureen Taylor - Wednesday, July 20, 2011
  • Organizing for Success with Karen Clifford - Wednesday, August 3, 2011

Click here to register.


FamilySearch Announces Releases of Hundreds of Millions of Civil War Records

As the United States marks the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, people who had ancestors involved in the conflict can access millions of historical records recently published on the familysearch.org website. And millions more records are coming, as Civil War indexing volunteers enlist in an epoch campaign over the next five years to provide access to the highly desirable historic documents.

FamilySearch announced the release today of hundreds of millions of online records at Librarians Day at the National Genealogical Society conference in Charleston, South Carolina. The collections include service records for both the Confederate and Union armies, pension records, and more. Some of the records have been available for some time but are now being added to familysearch.org/civilwar as part of this project. Here is just a sampling og what is available:

  • Arizona, Service Record of Confederate Soldiers of the Civil War, 1861-1863
  • Arkansas Confederate Pensions, 1901-1929
  • Civil War Pension Index
  • Louisiana Confederate Pensions, 1898-1950
  • Missouri Confederate Pension Applications and Soldiers' Home Admission Applications
  • South Carolina Compiled Service records of Confederate Soldiers (NARA M267)
  • South Carolina Probate 1671-1977
  • South Carolina Probate Records, Files, and Loose Papers, 1732-1964
  • United States, 1890 Census of Union Veterans and Widows
  • United States, Index to General Correspondence of the Pension Office, 1889-1904
  • United States Union Provost Marshall's Office Files of Papers Relating to Two or More Civilians, 1861-1866
  • U.S. Soldiers Index, 1855-1865
  • U.S. Navy Widows' Certificates, 1861-1910 (NARA M1279)
  • U.S. Registers of Enlistments in the U.S. Army, 1798-1914, Veterans Administration Pension Payment Cards, 1907-1933
  • Vermont Enrolled Militia, 1861-1867

"These records are significant because nearly every family in the United States at that time was impacted either directly or indirectly by the war," FamilySearch project manager Ken Nelson said. "Each soldier has a story to tell based on what his unique experience was during the war. Each family has their own story to tell. This is the paper trail that tells the stories about that period in our nation's history."

Many of the records are specific to the war itself, such as enlistment or pension records. These documents can provide key family data, including age, place of birth, or even name of spouse. Other collections, such as census records, tell the story of ordinary civilians who lived during that turbulent time. Even a local or state death record far away from the battlefront may contain death information on a soldier that was submitted by a family member back home.

FamilySearch's chief genealogical officer, David Rencher, said many people can benefit from the records.  "With the wealth of records created by the Civil War, I am inspired by the plan laid out by FamilySearch to make a substantial amount of this material available on their website over the next four to five years. This growing collection will be one that will serve the needs of the numerous descendants of the participants on both sides of the conflict," Rencher said.

About 10 million of FamilySearch's Civil War records are already indexed, so they can be easily searched by a specific name. However, there are many more records that need to be indexed, and that's where FamilySearch indexing volunteers come in. These volunteers view a digital image online of the record and enter in important information such as names, dates, and places.

FamilySearch project manager Jim Ericson said that this data will be used to create free searchable indexes that enable people to more easily find records about their Civil War ancestors. "Once these records are indexed and published online, anyone can search for the name of an ancestor and link to a digital image of the original record, if the image is also available online," according to Ericson. "Indexing helps people save time when finding records and enables a more powerful, engaging search experience."

Ericson said that more than 130,000 people helped enter other FamilySearch indexing projects in the last year, but more volunteers are needed for the multi-year Civil War era project. "We expect to maintain some focus on indexing records from the U.S. Civil War for the next three or four years to make the collection of Civil War era records extremely robust," Ericson said.

For those who want to learn more about their Civil War ancestors, there is also additional help on the FamilySearch ResearchWiki. This includes information about each regiment that fought in the conflict and records created by each states that participated in the war. There is also information for beginners who are just getting started learning about their ancestors who livied during the Civil War.

About FamilySearch

FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch has been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through 4,500 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.


Winners of the Legacy Family Tree Facebook Contest

Congratulations to the winners below of our Legacy Family Tree Facebook Contest. Thanks to everyone who participated by "liking" us on our new Facebook page.

Grand Prize Winner

Mary Joy Wells (of www.IdoCustomBooks.com) wins the brand new Acer Netbook Computer.

First Prize (five-CD webinar bundle) Winners

  • Wayne Lawrence (of Rochester, Massachusetts)
  • Kathy Thomson (of Brisbane, Queensland, Australia)
  • Linda Larner (of Manchester, United Kingdom)
  • Kitty L. Brown (of ?)
  • Jacob Czelusta (of Buffalo, New York)

Winners are required to contact Millennia via email at CustomerService@LegacyFamilyTree.com (send your name, your Facebook page's web address, and your mailing address). Winners must claim their prize no later than Friday, May 13, 2011. See the Legacy Family Tree blog for complete contest rules.


Free webinar now online - "Watch Geoff Live: Adding a Death Certificate"

LogoThis morning I received a death certificate for an ancestor and I was about ready to start adding it to Legacy when I had the idea to turn it into a "reality show" - with the death certificate as the star.

My boss called me right after today's impromptu webinar and said, "that was the best class you've ever given..." While I don't know about that, I am on cloud nine for how successful it was. I'm really excited for all of you to be able to watch it.

Just three hours before the event, I announced the impromptu mini-webinar on our Facebook page and blog, and couldn't believe that so many of you got the notice in time. The webinar turned out to be much more than a boring (I hope it wasn't boring anyways) class on typing in a death certificate. We discussed different websites, the Family History Library catalog, the source clipboard, how to analyze the evidence, and even how to organize your digital pictures - all with real documents using my personal database. It ended with a great question and answer session.

View the recording

If you could not make it to the live event, the 1 hour 23 minute recording of Watch Geoff Live: Adding a Death Certificate is now available in our webinar archives. Visit www.LegacyFamilyTree.com/webinars.asp to watch. Don't worry though - it won't take you 1 hour and 23 minutes to type in a death certificate. Click here to print the death certificate so you can follow along.

The recording will be available in the webinar archives until at least May 16, 2011.

Viewers' comments

Thanks to all the live attendees for your participation. It was so fun to interact with you the way we did. And from your comments, it sounds like we should plan many more of this type of webinar:

  • Enjoyed watching you work. It helped build my confidence in how I'm using Legacy, and I learned a few new tricks.
  • Watching you go through the steps you use and commenting as you do each one showed me so much more than just how to add a death certificate.
  • Very helpful to use real source (death certificate) and real family - and address all the problems that arise and watch the way you use Legacy and set up your files.
  • Excellent-citing the sources properly is one area where I am always questioning whether I am doing it properly. There were lots of tips today that I didn't know previously, so I am excited about trying some new things.Thank you!!!
  • I REALLY enjoyed this one more than almost all of the other ones.  I learned more about how to input informtion (and what all information I have not been inputting that I should have) today than I have from any other source - videos, webinars, books, etc.
  • It was very good. I think the things that didn't go so smoothly made it seem a lot more realistic than if it had been canned.
  • THANK YOU, I have been hesitant to use the source writer.  You explained it beautifully.  I will be able to add sources now.  This was a very informative webinar.  I hope you will do more like this!
  • This was a GREAT Webinar. I have the training CD's and watch them often. However, this live presentation is the most powerful learning tool you have provided.
  • This was a great webinar. I picked up a couple of tips that I didn't know. I will certainly forward the link to the recording to our local Legacy User Group as I am sure they would surely benefit for the "Reality Show".

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • Further Your Research and Unify Your Family Reunion with Beautiful Genealogy Charts with Janet Hovorka - Wednesday, May 11, 2011
  • Google Docs for Genealogists with Thomas MacEntee - Wednesday, May 18, 2011
  • Google Forms for Genealogists with Thomas MacEntee - Wednesday, June 1, 2011.
  • Ready, Set, Write! Share Your Family's Story with Lisa Alzo - Wednesday, June 29, 2011
  • The Power of DNA in Unlocking Family Relationships with Ugo Perego - Wednesday, July 13, 2011
  • Google Images and Beyond with Maureen Taylor - Wednesday, July 20, 2011
  • Organizing for Success with Karen Clifford - Wednesday, August 3, 2011

Click here to register.


Watch Geoff live: how to add a death certificate in Legacy Family Tree

GeoffMug2 In this mini-webinar (happening today at 4PM Eastern), Legacy's Geoff Rasmussen (that's me) will demonstrate what to do with a death certificate. You are invited to watch live as Geoff adds the information to his real, personal Legacy family file. This live, unscripted, and unplanned session will give you ideas on how to use the source clipboard, custom events, and some analysis.

I received this death certificate just this morning, and want to get entering the new information right away. I thought I'd invite all of you too to watch, or at least those of you who read this announcement in time. It will be broadcast today at 4:00PM Eastern (here's the time zone converter if you need it).

Register for the webinar by clicking here (free).

Print out the death certificate here so you can follow along.


Free webinar now online - Preserving Family Photographs

Logo
Anyone with an old photograph needs to watch Maureen Taylor's Preserving Family Photographs webinar. It is free to view in our webinar archives until May 14, 2011. Watch it and you will agree with The Wall Street Journal who called Maureen the nation's foremost historical photo detective.

View the recording

If you could not make it to the live event, the 1 hour 29 minute recording of Preserving Family Photographs is now available in our webinar archives. Visit www.LegacyFamilyTree.com/webinars.asp to watch.

Pre-order the webinar-on-CD and Maureen's book

Bwphoto Own your own copy of Preserving Family Photographs by purchasing the webinar-on-CD for just $9.95. It includes the recording of the class (1 hour 29 minutes) and the complete Q/A session. Click here for more information or to purchase.

Maureen's book, Preserving Your Family Photographs (208 pages) is the perfect companion to the webinar CD. In it, you will learn how to:

  • Identify the types of damage already done to the photos in your collection.
  • Take care of all your photos going forward, so that damage is a thing of the past.
  • Preserve your digital images - for you and future generations.
  • Select a conservator to repair damaged photos and protect them from more deterioration.
  • Select a restoration expert to restore damaged photos using airbrushing, digital manipulation, or photographic enhancements.
  • Create a stunning scrapbook that will endure, using archival quality guidelines.
  • Properly handle cased images such as daguerreotypes, ambrotypes and tintypes.
  • Explore techniques to share your images.
  • Take advantage of low-cost alternatives to traditional photo preservation techniques.

Purchase the book and the webinar-on-CD for just $29.95 (sold separately $34.94).

Special Discount Coupon

The special discount coupon of photos that was announced during the webinar is valid for 10% off anything in our online store through Monday, May 9, 2011.

Viewers' comments

  • An excellent webinar packed with information and ideas. Maureen Taylor speaks in a clear tone and at a measured pace so that all of the information comes through very well.
  • Fantastic! Now to put this welcome information into practice immediately since my project for the week has to do with my many and varied photos. I appreciated the pace of the webinar which allowed me to make notes and pay attention too.
  • I absolutely enjoyed every moment of this webinar. I'm looking forward to her next webinar and I'm going to check out her askmaureentaylor.com website immediately. Thank you so much for all this information. I am a beginner and I think the webinar helped beginners as well as seasoned researchers!
  • I always learn from Maureen Taylor. She truly is the best source of information on photographs.
  • I have made so many mistakes in preserving our family photographs in the past. What I learned today is invaluable. Thank you Maureen for presenting this and thank you Legacy for making this webinar available.
  • Several very, very good points made about handling and storing, and especially good tips about digital storage for future quality of access and printing. Many thanks!
  • This was the best seminar ever. She was onspot, exactly as promised and totally on topic.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • Further Your Research and Unify Your Family Reunion with Beautiful Genealogy Charts with Janet Hovorka - Wednesday, May 11, 2011
  • Google Docs for Genealogists with Thomas MacEntee - Wednesday, May 18, 2011
  • Google Forms for Genealogists with Thomas MacEntee - Wednesday, June 1, 2011.
  • Ready, Set, Write! Share Your Family's Story with Lisa Alzo - Wednesday, June 29, 2011
  • The Power of DNA in Unlocking Family Relationships with Ugo Perego - Wednesday, July 13, 2011
  • Google Images and Beyond with Maureen Taylor - Wednesday, July 20, 2011
  • Organizing for Success with Karen Clifford - Wednesday, August 3, 2011

Click here to register.


FamilySearch Records Update: Over 2 million more digital images released for Brazil, Chile, El Salvador, Honduras, Mexico, Switzerland, U.S., and Wales

More digital images poured out of the FamilySearch pipeline this week—over 2 million, in fact. Historic record collections for 8 countries were updated: Brazil, Chile, El Salvador, Honduras, Mexico, Switzerland, U.S., and Wales. The biggest winners were Brazil and Honduras. More than 1.7 million images were added to the Brazil Civil Registration collection, with records from 1870 to 2009. And 346,000 church records were added for Honduras. These birth, marriage, death, and church records are very valuable because they usually include multiple generations in a single document. See the table below for details of all the updates this week. You can search all of the record collections now for free at FamilySearch.org.

If you are enjoying the steady stream of free records added weekly, please consider “giving back” as a FamilySearch volunteer. You can start and stop volunteering at any time. Find out more at indexing.familysearch.org.

Collection

Records

Images

Comment

Brazil Civil Registration, 1870–2009

19,319

1,688,985

Added images and index to existing collection.

Chile, Concepcion, Civil Registration, 1885–1903

0

43,001

Added browsable images to existing collection.

El Salvador, Civil Registration Records, 1867–1910

0

25,938

Added browsable images to existing collection.

Honduras, Church Records, 1895–1931

0

346,448

Added browsable images to existing collection.

Mexico, Puebla, Catholic Church Records, 1545–1970

0

38,391

Added browsable images to existing collection.

Switzerland, Basel City, Local Citizenship Requests, 1348–1798

0

1,751

New browsable image collection.

U.S., Maryland, Register of Wills Books, 1792–1983

0

86,744

Added browsable images to existing collection.

U.S., Mississippi, Tippah County Records, 1836–1923

0

20,542

Added browsable images to existing collection.

U.S., Ohio, Cuyahoga County Probate Files, 1813–1900

0

14,696

Added browsable images to existing collection.

U.S., Ohio, Stark County Court Records, 1809–1917

0

49,819

New browsable image collection.

United States, 1890 Census of Union Veterans and Widows of the Civil War

0

90,497

New browsable image collection.

Wales, Probate Abstracts, 1773–1780

0

34,851

Added browsable images to existing collection.

FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch has been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.


Enter the Legacy Family Tree Facebook Contest

Win a Netbook or a Special Legacy Family Tree Software/Webinar Bundle

May 2, 2011 – Surprise, AZ. Legacy Family Tree from Millennia Corporation announces a contest at its new Facebook page where contestants could win one of five special Legacy Family Tree software/webinar bundles and even a new netbook computer!

Contest Rules

Between May 2 and May 6, 2011, simply visit the new Legacy Family Tree page on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/LegacyFamilyTree and click the Like button. That’s it! And if you’ve already clicked the Like button, you’re already entered in the contest! By liking the Legacy Family Tree page, you’ll automatically be entered in the contest. Winners will be drawn on May 7, 2011 from all those Facebook visitors who have hit the Like button for the Legacy Family Tree page. Millennia will post the list of winners at the Legacy Family Tree blog on Monday, May 9, 2011. Winners are required to contact Millennia via email at CustomerService@LegacyFamilyTree.com. Winners must claim their prize no later than Friday, May 13, 2011. See the Legacy Family Tree blog for complete contest rules.

Legacy Family Tree Expands Its Social Media Presence

You can now get the latest news about Legacy Family Tree software as well as its cutting-edge series of genealogy webinars, by following the Legacy Family Tree Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/LegacyFamilyTree. In addition, check out the Legacy Family Tree blog at http://news.legacyfamilytree.com for additional news.

About Legacy Family Tree
“The most powerful and easy-to-use family tree software," Legacy Family Tree helps you find your ancestors, organize your research, and publish beautiful charts, and more. Take a tour of Legacy Family Tree at http://www.legacyfamilytree.com/Tour.asp

About Millennia Corporation

Founded in 1984, Millennia Corporation publishes the award-winning Legacy Family Tree genealogy software program, with headquarters in Surprise, Arizona. More information can be found at http://www.LegacyFamilyTree.com.