Previous month:
January 2016
Next month:
March 2016

Register for Webinar Friday - Problem Solving with FANs by Beth Foulk

Beth Foulk - Problem Solving with FANs

Often the answer to climbing a genealogy brick wall is simply to go around it. By broadening our research to include our ancestor’s friends, associates and neighbors, we can find answers that were previously elusive. Further, we paint a much broader, richer story of the ancestor's life by including their FANs. This class deconstructs the FAN concept then demonstrates how to use them in analysis through multiple examples.

Logotransparent

Join us and Beth Foulk for the live webinar Friday, February 19, 2016 at 2pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion.  

Download the syllabus

In preparation for the webinar, download the supplemental syllabus materials here. The syllabus is available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers. Log in here or subscribe here.

Registerbut 

Or register for multiple webinars at once by clicking here.

Not sure if you already registered?

Login to view your registration status for this webinar (available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers).

Test Your Webinar Connection

To ensure that your webinar connection is ready to go, click here.

Can't make it to the live event?

No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

BethFoulk-144x144Beth discovered her love of genealogy through her father, who built a 115-name family tree with every family member’s name he knew. While Beth continues to research her family, she shares her knowledge through lectures, articles, her blog, and one-on-one assistance. She particularly enjoys speaking at regional conferences. Her focus is Early American Genealogy.

Add it to your Google Calendar

With our Google Calendar button, you will never forget our upcoming webinars. Simply click the button to add it to your calendar. You can then optionally embed the webinar events (and even turn them on and off) into your own personal calendar. If you have already added the calendar, you do not have to do it again - the new webinar events will automatically appear.

Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Friday, February 19, 2016 at:

  • 2pm Eastern (U.S.)
  • 1pm Central
  • 12pm Mountain
  • 11am Pacific

Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email both 1 day and 1 hour prior to the live webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone.

We look forward to seeing you all there!


FamilySearch Records Update: New records for Canada, England, Honduras, Italy, Liberia, New Zealand, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, South Africa, Spain, Ukraine, United States, and Venezuela

FamilySearch Records Update

It will take some time to peruse this week's updates--50 in all! Check out all of the marriage records from a variety of states, including New York, Indiana, Illinois, and Ohio. Other highlights include New York New York Index to Alien Crewmen Who Were Discharged or Who Deserted 1917-1957, California San Francisco Airplane Arrival Card Index 1936-1949, Ukraine Kyiv Orthodox Consistory Church Book Duplicates 1734-1920, and New Zealand Auckland Waikumete Cemetery Records 1886-1943 . Find these and more by following the links bellow.

COLLECTION

INDEXED RECORDS

DIGITAL RECORDS

COMMENTS

BillionGraves Index

227,783

227,783

Added indexed records and images to an existing collection

British Columbia Marriage Registrations 1859-1932; 1937-1938

6,123

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

California San Francisco Airplane Arrival Card Index 1936-1949

22,858

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

England and Wales Census 1861

2,504,271

111,092

Added indexed records and images to an existing collection

England Durham Diocese Marriage Bonds & Allegations 1692-1900

35,079

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Florida and South Carolina Airplane Arrival Manifests 1944-1945

0

127

New browsable image collection.

Florida Knights Keys Passenger Lists 1908-1912

5,399

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Honduras Civil Registration 1841-1968

0

609

Added images to an existing collection

Idaho Birth Index 1861-1911

60,430

0

New indexed records collection

Idaho Death Certificates 1938-1961

118,152

0

New indexed records collection

Illinois Cook County Deaths 1878-1994

3,732,138

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Indiana Marriages 1811-2007

276,945

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Italy Bergamo Civil Registration (State Archive) 1866-1901

6,965

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Italy Caltanissetta Civil Registration (State Archive) 1820-1935

78,629

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Italy Grosseto Civil Registration (State Archive) 1851-1907

113,690

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Italy Modena Civil Registration (State Archive) 1806-1942

67,474

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Italy Prato Civil Registration (State Archive) 1866-1923

7,183

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Italy Reggio Calabria Civil Registration (State Archive) 1784-1943

0

2,143,899

Added images to an existing collection

Italy Viterbo Civil Registration (State Archive) 1870-1943

90,051

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Kansas County Marriages 1855-1911

311,857

2,333

Added images to an existing collection

Kansas Marriages 1811-1911

185,068

0

New indexed records collection

Liberia Marriage Records 1941-1974

24,625

24,406

New browsable image collection.

Louisiana Parish Marriages 1837-1957

46,810

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Maine Crew List Arriving at Eastport 1949-1958

7,239

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Maryland County Marriages 1658-1940

53,762

0

New indexed records collection

Minnesota County Marriages 1860-1949

570,213

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Mississippi Tippah County Marriages 1858-1979

19,583

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Missouri County Marriage Naturalization and Court Records 1800-1991

57,837

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

New York County Marriages 1847-1848; 1908-1936

252,052

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

New York New York Index to Alien Crewmen Who Were Discharged or Who Deserted 1917-1957

1,270,298

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island) 1891-1924

0

3,243,611

New browsable image collection.

New York Passenger Lists 1820-1891

30,480

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

New Zealand Auckland Waikumete Cemetery Records 1886-1943

0

971

New browsable image collection.

North Carolina County Marriages 1762-1979

1,796

1,796

Added indexed records to an existing collection

North Dakota Manifests of Immigrant Arrivals 1910-1952

11,631

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Ohio County Marriages 1789-2013

92,719

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Ohio Washington County Court Records 1810-1930

0

6,421

Added images to an existing collection

Oklahoma County Marriages 1890-1995

126,532

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Ontario Births 1869-1910

125,109

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Pennsylvania Crew Lists arriving at Erie 1952-1957

44,119

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Peru Áncash Civil Registration 1888-2005

0

3,146

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Peru Cajamarca Civil Registration 1938-1996

0

3,175

Added images to an existing collection

Philippines Civil Registration (National) 1945-1984

180,213

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Poland Radom Roman Catholic Church Books 1587-1966

1,884

62

Added indexed records and images to an existing collection

Portugal Portalegre Catholic Church Records 1859-1911

4,441

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

South Africa Netherdutch Reformed Church Registers (Pretoria Archive) 1838- 1991

48,422

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Spain Province of Cádiz Municipal Records 1784-1956

0

57

Added images to an existing collection

Ukraine Kyiv Orthodox Consistory Church Book Duplicates 1734-1920

0

189,353

Added images to an existing collection

Utah County Marriages 1887-1937

337,714

124,465

Added indexed records and images to an existing collection

Venezuela Archdiocese of Mérida Catholic Church Records 1654-2013

0

405,819

Added images to an existing collection

Help Us Publish More Free Records Online

Searchable historical records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of online volunteers worldwide. These volunteers transcribe (or index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are always needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published weekly online on FamilySearch.org. Learn how you can volunteer to help provide free access to the world’s historical genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/Indexing.
 
About FamilySearch International
 
FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,893 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Microsoft Word Series - #1 Getting Started with Microsoft Word - free webinar by Thomas MacEntee now available for limited time

2016-02-17-image500blog

The recording of today's webinar, the first of the Microsoft Word Training Series, "Getting Started with Microsoft Word" by Thomas MacEntee is now available to view for free for a limited time at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com. 

While Microsoft Word – part of the Microsoft Office Suite – is one of the most dynamic software programs for document creation, various features can quickly frustrate even the most patient user. Learn the basics of Microsoft Word including “why” certain functions and features operate the way they do. Topics to be covered include basic document setup, styles, formatting and more.

Microsoft Word Training Series - all 11 courses now available

Brand new - the entire series of 11 classes which contains more than 7 hours of professional and incremental training on using Word is now available for webinar subscribers here.

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 44 minute recording of "Getting Started with Microsoft Word" PLUS the after-webinar party is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership.

Mp4Digital Download

This webinar recording is also available as a digital download for just $9.95. It includes the .mp4 and the syllabus for one low price. Click here to purchase. Or, subscribe for a month or a year and also have access to the recording and handouts for the duration of your membership.

Coupon code

Use webinar coupon code - word - for 10% off anything at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com or www.LegacyFamilyTreeStore.com, valid through Monday, February 22, 2016. 

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 317 classes, 460 hours of genealogy education)
  • On-demand access to the instructor handouts (now 1,365 pages)
  • On-demand access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Chance for a members-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
  • Ability to view which webinars you are registered for
  • Use of the playlist, resume watching, and jump-to features

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year
  • Monthly membership: $9.95/month

Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • Problem Solving with FANs by Beth Foulk. February 19.
  • A Guided Tour of Cyndi's List 2.0 by Cyndi Ingle. February 24.
  • The War of 1812 Records - Preserving the Pensions by Rebecca Koford. March 2.
  • Making YDNA and mtDNA Part of Your Family History by Diahan Southard. March 4.
  • How Do I Know That's My Ancestor? by Amy Johnson Crow. March 9.
  • The Private Laws of the Federal and State Governments by Judy Russell. March 16.
  • Introduction to German Parish Records by Gail Blankenau. March 23.
  • Proof Arguments - How to Write Them and Why They Matter by Warren Bittner. March 30.
  • Getting to Know Findmypast - Your Source for British and Irish Genealogy by Jen Baldwin. April 6.
  • Confirming Enslaved Ancestors Utilizing DNA by Melvin Collier. April 8.
  • U.S. Land Records - State Land States by Mary Hill. April 13.
  • Fire Insurance Maps - The Google Maps of Their Day by Jill Morelli. April 20.
  • England and Wales - Rummaging in the Parish Chests by Kirsty Gray. April 27.
  • Google Drive for Genealogists by Thomas MacEntee. May 4.
  • Dirty Pictures - Save Your Family Photos from Ruin by Denise Levenick. May 11.
  • Messages from the Grave - Listening to Your Ancestor's Tombstone by Elissa Scalise Powell. May 13.
  • Mining the Über-sites for German Ancestors by Jim Beidler. May 18.
  • Discover American Ancestors (NEHGS) by Lindsay Fulton. May 25.
  • Get the Most from AmericanAncestors.org by Claire Vail. June 1.
  • Researching Your Washington State Ancestors by Mary Roddy. June 8.
  • Introduction to the Freedmen's Bureau by Angela Walton-Raji. June 10.
  • Ticked Off! Those Pesky Pre-1850 Census Tic Marks by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen. June 15.
  • Digging Deeper in German Parish Records by Gail Blankenau. June 22.
  • Circles or Triangles? What Shape is Your DNA? by Diahan Southard. June 29.
  • Navigating Naturalization Records by Lisa Alzo. July 6.
  • A Genealogist's Guide to Heraldry by Shannon Combs-Bennett. July 13.
  • Finding French Ancestors by Luana Darby. July 15.
  • Organize Your Online Life by Lisa Louise Cooke. July 20.
  • Researching Women - Community Cookbooks and What They Tell Us About Our Ancestors by Gena Philibert-Ortega. July 27.
  • The Germanic French - Researching Alsatian and Lorrainian Families by John Philip Colletta. July 30.
  • Solutions for Missing and Scarce Records by Tom Jones. July 30.
  • Getting Started with Microsoft PowerPoint by Thomas MacEntee. August 3.
  • The Battle for Bounty Land - War of 1812 and Mexican-American Wars by Beth Foulk. August 10.
  • Homestead Act of 1862 - Following the Witnesses by Bernice Bennett. August 12.
  • Successfully Applying to a Lineage Society by Amy Johnson Crow. August 17.
  • Using Findmypast to Unlock Your Irish Ancestry by Brian Donovan. August 24.
  • The Treasure Trove in Legislative Petitions by Judy Russell. September 14.
  • Clooz - A Document-Based Software Companion by Richard Thomas. September 16.
  • How to Use FamilySearch.org for Beginners by Devin Ashby. September 21.
  • Beginning Polish Genealogy by Lisa Alzo and Jonathan Shea. September 28.
  • AHA! Analysis of Handwriting for Genealogical Research by Ron Arons. October 5.
  • Time and Place - Using Genealogy's Cross-Hairs by Jim Beidler. October 12.
  • Finding Your Ancestors' German Hometown by Ursula Krause. October 14.
  • Social History Websites That Bring Your Ancestor's Story to Life by Gena Philibert-Ortega. October 19.
  • Flip for Flickr - Share, Store and Save Your Family Photos by Maureen Taylor. October 26.
  • Analysis and Correlation - Two Keys to Sound Conclusions by Chris Staats. November 2.
  • Publishing a Genealogy E-Book by Thomas MacEntee. November 9.
  • Dating Family Photographs by Jane Neff Rollins. November 16.
  • Nature & Nurture - Family History for Adoptees by Janet Hovorka and Amy Slade. November 18.
  • Multi-Media Story Telling by Devin Ashby. November 30.
  • Becoming a Genealogy Detective by Sharon Atkins. December 7.
  • From the Heartland - Utilizing Online Resources in Midwest Research by Luana Darby. December 14.
  • Tracing Your European Ancestors by Julie Goucher. December 16.
  • An Introduction to BillionGraves by Garth Fitzner. December 21.

Click here to register.

Print the 2016 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


Tuesday's Tip - Keeping Track of DNA Contacts in Legacy

  Keeping Track of DNA Contacts in Legacy

Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

Keeping Track of DNA Contacts in Legacy

Did you know that you can keep track of contact information for living relatives in Legacy Family Tree? With a little creativity you can also keep track of cousins who are DNA matches. 

DNA is a big thing these days and you will talking to more and more distant relatives that are shared matches. It is important that you have a way to record all of the person's contact info as well as some notes about the connection. Legacy can do that!

All you need to do is make sure that the person is in your database. You know they are related (shared DNA) but even if you don't know how yet you can add them as an unlinked individual. Click on the Address icon, the one on the main Individual's Information screen.

AddressIcon

You can add their complete postal address, two phone numbers, email and a webpage, if they have one. You can write everything you need to know about this person in the notes tab. You can copy and paste correspondence in here if you need to. If you save your correspondence as a file, you can simply attach it via the media link. You can attach screenshots of their chromosome browser when compared to you either here or in their main Media Gallery via a DNA event that you add.

ContactInfoScreen


HINT #1 - If they use a screen name on the DNA websites that is different than their real name enter that as an AKA. This is especially helpful if they are on all three of the DNA sites but use different names on each. You can easily look someone up by their AKA to see if you have had contact with them before. It is impossible to memorize 800 matches. If you put the AKA in privacy brackets [[IndianPrincess04]] these AKAs won't print in reports.

HINT #2 - I would reserve a tag just for known DNA matches.

HINT #3 - You can use the USER ID field to record important info that you can see at a glance, for example, you can record which line they are in. There are many different possibilities that you can use this field for. You also have the Prefix and Suffix fields at your disposal. Just remember to use privacy brackets if you are putting DNA info in the Prefix and Suffix fields.

HINT #4 - This one is a little timesaver. If you pull up their address in Legacy you can email them from within the program by clicking the << to the right.

HINT #5 - Next to their name on the Address screen you can put some extra info in privacy brackets. If you put [[DNA]] before their name all of the DNA addresses will default to the top. You can then put any specifics after their name also in privacy brackets [[SIMMONS yDNA kit 469534]]. None of this will print. You can then print labels just on these people if you need to do a mailing. There is an option to included only tagged addresses.

The more information you can keep in a single program (Legacy) the easier things are!

I am sure you can come up with some more creative ways to keep track of DNA matches in Legacy.

 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips checkout the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis is part of the technical support team at Millennia, the makers of the Legacy Family Tree software program. With over 20 years of research experience, Michele’s passion is helping new genealogists get started on the right foot through her writings, classes and lectures. She is the former staff genealogist and weekly columnist for the McDuffie Mirror and now authors Ancestoring, a blog geared toward the beginner/intermediate researcher.

 

 


Register for Webinar Wednesday - Getting Started with Microsoft Word by Thomas MacEntee

 

ThomasMacEntee-MSWord

While Microsoft Word – part of the Microsoft Office Suite – is one of the most dynamic software programs for document creation, various features can quickly frustrate even the most patient user. Learn the basics of Microsoft Word including “why” certain functions and features operate the way they do. Topics to be covered include basic document setup, styles, formatting and more.

Logotransparent

Join us and Thomas MacEntee for the live webinar Wednesday, February 17, 2016 at 2pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion.  

Download the syllabus

In preparation for the webinar, download the supplemental syllabus materials here. The syllabus is available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers. Log in here or subscribe here.

Registerbut 

Or register for multiple webinars at once by clicking here.

Not sure if you already registered?

Login to view your registration status for this webinar (available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers).

Test Your Webinar Connection

To ensure that your webinar connection is ready to go, click here.

Can't make it to the live event?

No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

ThomasMacEntee-144x144What happens when a “tech guy” with a love for history gets laid off during The Great Recession of 2008? You get Thomas MacEntee, a genealogy professional who’s also a blogger, educator, author, social media connector, online community builder and more.

Thomas was laid off after a 25-year career in the information technology field, so he started his own genealogy-related business called High Definition Genealogy. He also created an online community of over 3,000 family history bloggers known as GeneaBloggers. His most recent endeavor, Hack Genealogy, is an attempt to “re-purpose today’s technology for tomorrow’s genealogy.”

Thomas describes himself as a lifelong learner with a background in a multitude of topics who has finally figured out what he does best: teach, inspire, instigate, and serve as a curator and go-to-guy for concept nurturing and inspiration. Thomas is a big believer in success, and that we all succeed when we help each other find success.

Add it to your Google Calendar

With our Google Calendar button, you will never forget our upcoming webinars. Simply click the button to add it to your calendar. You can then optionally embed the webinar events (and even turn them on and off) into your own personal calendar. If you have already added the calendar, you do not have to do it again - the new webinar events will automatically appear.

Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Wednesday, February 17, 2016 at:

  • 2pm Eastern (U.S.)
  • 1pm Central
  • 12pm Mountain
  • 11am Pacific

Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email both 1 day and 1 hour prior to the live webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone.

We look forward to seeing you all there!


Original Sources: Are They Always Accurate?

Is your genealogy accurate? Genealogists strive for accuracy. We want to be sure we have the right great-grandmother, the correct year of birth or death, the correct parents for our 3rd great-grandfather.

OriginalSources3

We spend hours, days, weeks, even months looking for original sources. But what are original records and sources? They are documents and records that were created at or around the time that an event occurred. These include such documents as vital statistic registrations, newspapers, tax lists, court records, church records, land records, funeral home documents, census records, personal letters and diaries, and other more obscure items such as funeral cards, coffin plates, and so on.

Primary versus Secondary Information

An original source might contain primary information or secondary information.

  • Primary information is information given by a witness to the event, or a knowledgeable participant.
  • Secondary information is information provided by someone who was not a witness to the event.

Our joy at finding such important records results in what is often referred to as the “Genealogy Happy Dance!”

Original Sources: Are They Always Accurate?
Original Sources image by Lorine McGinnis Schulze


But beware! Original sources are not always accurate. As careful and methodical genealogists we must consider the possibility that there may be errors in a record. What are the ways this can happen?

  1. The informant (the person giving the information) might not be the person who is participating in the event. For example, it’s obvious that the deceased does not provide the personal information on a death registration. A third party such as a son, a daughter, a spouse, a family friend, a doctor or other invidividual provides personal information about the deceased.
  1. The informant may not know the answers and may thus provide incorrect details. Don’t assume, for example, that details on a tombstone are correct. Remember that the information on a tombstone was almost certainly provided by a family member, who may or may not have known the correct details. For example, my great-grandfather’s stone was erected by his daughter who told the stonemaker the wrong birth date for her father. His baptismal record provides his birth and his baptism year which was two years before the date his daughter gave.
  1. The informant might lie. This is especially true where ages are concerned. Sometimes brides subtract a few years from their ages when asked by the minister at their marriage.
  1. The clerk recording the information may not hear the response correctly and may enter it incorrectly.
  1. The information on the record might have been entered after the event took place. Memories are often wrong, and the recorder is relying on memory. Here’s an example – a minister or priest performs a baptism but doesn’t enter it immediately in the register book. A day or two later he sits down to enter the past week’s baptisms, marriages and burials. He forgets the exact day little Henry Smith was baptised. Worse, he can’t recall the first name of the child he baptised, he only knows their parents’ names. But he thinks it was James so he records that in the book. In actuality James is the name of an older brother and the child he baptised was called John.
  1. The informant might be confused by the question. In my own family tree, my great-grandmother's official government death registration is incorrect. Her parents' names are wrong. Since I already knew who her parents were (Isaac Vollick & Lydia Jamieson) from other genealogy sources, I was completely bewildered by seeing her parents’ names recorded as Stephen Vollick and Mary.

    Then it dawned on me - Stephen was my great grandmother's husband's first name (Stephen Peer). Mary was my great grandmother's own name. (Mary Vollick)

But who was the informant? The informant was Mary's 17-year old son. Her husband had died when their son was a toddler, and their older children were married and gone. The task of answering the official questions fell to her 17-year old son who had cared for her in her final days.

It is easy to see how the young boy, when asked by a government clerk "Father's name?" (meaning father of the deceased), might have replied "Stephen", for in fact Stephen was HIS own father's name.

The question "Mother's name?" referring to the mother of the deceased, would be answered with "Mary" which was HIS mother's name.

And thus the official death registration for parents of Mary (Peer) Vollick daughter of Isaac and Lydia Vollick, is forever rendered as Stephen and Mary Vollick.

So be cautious when you encounter an original source that simply doesn't match other reliable sources. Investigate! Think! Don't just accept the new details without further research to prove or disprove them.

You can read more about original sources here:

You can also watch these classes in the Legacy Family Tree Webinars library:

 

Lorine McGinnis Schulze is a Canadian genealogist who has been involved with genealogy and history for more than thirty years. In 1996 Lorine created the Olive Tree Genealogy website and its companion blog. Lorine is the author of many published genealogical and historical articles and books.

 

 

 


The Scots-Irish in America - free webinar by Peggy Lauritzen now online for limited time

2016-02-10-image500blog

The recording of last night's webinar, "The Scots-Irish in America" by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen is now available to view for free for a limited time at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com.

Many Americans can trace their ancestry back to the British Isles. Some have even heard that their background was “Scotch-Irish”. We will focus on who these people were and where they came from in the British Isles.

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 19 minute recording of "The Scots-Irish in America" is now available to view in our webinar library for free. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership.

Mp4Digital Download

This webinar recording is available as a digital download for just $9.95. It includes the .mp4 and the syllabus for one low price. Click here to purchase. Or, subscribe for a month or a year and also have access to the recording and handouts for the duration of your membership.

Coupon code

Use webinar coupon code - irish - for 10% off anything at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com or www.LegacyFamilyTreeStore.com, valid through Monday, February 15, 2016. 

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 306 classes, 458 hours of genealogy education)
  • On-demand access to the instructor handouts (now 1,347 pages)
  • On-demand access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Chance for a members-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
  • Ability to view which webinars you are registered for
  • Use of the playlist, resume watching, and jump-to features

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year
  • Monthly membership: $9.95/month

Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • Getting Started with Microsoft Word by Thomas MacEntee. February 17.
  • Problem Solving with FANs by Beth Foulk. February 19.
  • A Guided Tour of Cyndi's List 2.0 by Cyndi Ingle. February 24.
  • The War of 1812 Records - Preserving the Pensions by Michael Hall. March 2.
  • Making YDNA and mtDNA Part of Your Family History by Diahan Southard. March 4.
  • How Do I Know That's My Ancestor? by Amy Johnson Crow. March 9.
  • The Private Laws of the Federal and State Governments by Judy Russell. March 16.
  • Introduction to German Parish Records by Gail Blankenau. March 23.
  • Proof Arguments - How to Write Them and Why They Matter by Warren Bittner. March 30.
  • Getting to Know Findmypast - Your Source for British and Irish Genealogy by Jen Baldwin. April 6.
  • Confirming Enslaved Ancestors Utilizing DNA by Melvin Collier. April 8.
  • U.S. Land Records - State Land States by Mary Hill. April 13.
  • Fire Insurance Maps - The Google Maps of Their Day by Jill Morelli. April 20.
  • England and Wales - Rummaging in the Parish Chests by Kirsty Gray. April 27.
  • Google Drive for Genealogists by Thomas MacEntee. May 4.
  • Dirty Pictures - Save Your Family Photos from Ruin by Denise Levenick. May 11.
  • Messages from the Grave - Listening to Your Ancestor's Tombstone by Elissa Scalise Powell. May 13.
  • Mining the Über-sites for German Ancestors by Jim Beidler. May 18.
  • Discover American Ancestors (NEHGS) by Lindsay Fulton. May 25.
  • Get the Most from AmericanAncestors.org by Claire Vail. June 1.
  • Researching Your Washington State Ancestors by Mary Roddy. June 8.
  • Introduction to the Freedmen's Bureau by Angela Walton-Raji. June 10.
  • Ticked Off! Those Pesky Pre-1850 Census Tic Marks by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen. June 15.
  • Digging Deeper in German Parish Records by Gail Blankenau. June 22.
  • Circles or Triangles? What Shape is Your DNA? by Diahan Southard. June 29.
  • Navigating Naturalization Records by Lisa Alzo. July 6.
  • A Genealogist's Guide to Heraldry by Shannon Combs-Bennett. July 13.
  • Finding French Ancestors by Luana Darby. July 15.
  • Organize Your Online Life by Lisa Louise Cooke. July 20.
  • Researching Women - Community Cookbooks and What They Tell Us About Our Ancestors by Gena Philibert-Ortega. July 27.
  • The Germanic French - Researching Alsatian and Lorrainian Families by John Philip Colletta. July 30.
  • Solutions for Missing and Scarce Records by Tom Jones. July 30.
  • Getting Started with Microsoft PowerPoint by Thomas MacEntee. August 3.
  • The Battle for Bounty Land - War of 1812 and Mexican-American Wars by Beth Foulk. August 10.
  • Homestead Act of 1862 - Following the Witnesses by Bernice Bennett. August 12.
  • Successfully Applying to a Lineage Society by Amy Johnson Crow. August 17.
  • Using Findmypast to Unlock Your Irish Ancestry by Brian Donovan. August 24.
  • The Treasure Trove in Legislative Petitions by Judy Russell. September 14.
  • Clooz - A Document-Based Software Companion by Richard Thomas. September 16.
  • How to Use FamilySearch.org for Beginners by Devin Ashby. September 21.
  • Beginning Polish Genealogy by Lisa Alzo and Jonathan Shea. September 28.
  • AHA! Analysis of Handwriting for Genealogical Research by Ron Arons. October 5.
  • Time and Place - Using Genealogy's Cross-Hairs by Jim Beidler. October 12.
  • Finding Your Ancestors' German Hometown by Ursula Krause. October 14.
  • Social History Websites That Bring Your Ancestor's Story to Life by Gena Philibert-Ortega. October 19.
  • Flip for Flickr - Share, Store and Save Your Family Photos by Maureen Taylor. October 26.
  • Analysis and Correlation - Two Keys to Sound Conclusions by Chris Staats. November 2.
  • Publishing a Genealogy E-Book by Thomas MacEntee. November 9.
  • Dating Family Photographs by Jane Neff Rollins. November 16.
  • Nature & Nurture - Family History for Adoptees by Janet Hovorka and Amy Slade. November 18.
  • Multi-Media Story Telling by Devin Ashby. November 30.
  • Becoming a Genealogy Detective by Sharon Atkins. December 7.
  • From the Heartland - Utilizing Online Resources in Midwest Research by Luana Darby. December 14.
  • Tracing Your European Ancestors by Julie Goucher. December 16.
  • An Introduction to BillionGraves by Garth Fitzner. December 21.

Click here to register.

Print the 2016 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


Tuesday's Tip - Using the USA County Verification Feature

TT - County Verification3

Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

Using the USA County Verification Feature

USA County Verification is a feature in Legacy Family Tree that checks the county you are entering as you type it. If Legacy thinks the county is incorrect it will let you know.

1) You turn this feature on in Options > Customize > 2. Data Entry.
Option 2.1 - check the box for Verify USA Counties in Place Names

I keep this ON because this option does two things. It will tell you if you have entered a county that never existed in that state (possibly a simple spelling error or you totally have the wrong name) and it will also tell you if you are entering a county that didn't exist when your event occurred. For example, if I were to enter a death that occurred in Lamar County, Mississippi in 1850 I will get an error message because Lamar wasn't formed until 1904.

2) See the screenshot for information about what the error message can tell you.

CountyVerifier


3) Check your current data by going to Reports > Other Reports > USA County Verification. You can then see if there are any locations in your file that you still need to address. You might have overridden the error message because you weren't sure about the location and you told yourself that you would look into it. If you forgot, it will show up on this report.

Making sure your locations are accurate is the first step in getting your genealogy database organized. Give it a try and you’ll be on your way to clean data. Any questions? Head for the Facebook Legacy User Group (info below).

 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips checkout the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis is part of the technical support team at Millennia, the makers of the Legacy Family Tree software program. With over 20 years of research experience, Michele’s passion is helping new genealogists get started on the right foot through her writings, classes and lectures. She is the former staff genealogist and weekly columnist for the McDuffie Mirror and now authors Ancestoring, a blog geared toward the beginner/intermediate researcher.


Maritime Occupations in the US Federal Census

How would you react if you discovered your ancestor's occupation was listed as "wharf rat?"In the 1880 US Census, 19 year old Major Thomas living in Mobile, Alabama is called just that! In that particular schedule, young Major was a prisoner in the Mobile County Jail.[1] Without knowing that wharf rat is a term for someone who loads/unloads cargo off ships, you might have come to a different conclusion.

Sailor-loc-09957v-final

Back in June, I wrote about records specific for researching seafaring ancestors in the United States. However, clues about their occupation can be gleaned from standard genealogical sources that are not specific to maritime life. When searching for sailors, captains, privateers, etc. it's always good to look at the standard genealogical sources before delving into shipping records because researchers more often than not need certain details to find a record of their ancestor on a maritime voyage.

Since 1850, the United States Census has instructed enumerators to note the individual’s occupation, thus these records are direct accounts of what they did for work. I have been curious, though, as to the diversity of maritime occupations in U.S. Census Records because sometimes the occupations they list are unfamiliar. What I also found unusual in learning about maritime trades is how descriptions of occupations are interchanged frequently. For example, a person who was a seaman, sailor, seafarer or a mariner essentially meant the same thing.

As an example, I searched the 1880 US Federal Census on Ancestry.com. I used Ancestry because the census search form allows you to search by occupation-only if desired. Below are examples of occupations for seafaring ancestors found in the U.S. Census:

  • Boatswain’s/Bosun’s Mate - Boatswain's mates are senior members of a ship’s crew. They supervise members of the ship’s department related to the hull and deck.

  • Customs Collector - Head officer at the customs house. Administered maritime and navigation laws, trade regulations, and protection of American seamen.

  • Inspector of Customs - There was no official title of inspector in the U.S. Customs Service, so this occupation could encompass the other positions of surveyor, weigher, and gauger. These positions were responsible for the collection of duties, assessment of cargo, and confiscation of illegal goods.

  • Longshoreman - A manual laborer who loaded and unloaded cargo off ships. Other names for this occupation that are recorded in the U.S. Census are dock loader, stevedore, lumper, and wharf rat.

  • Master Mariner - A master mariner is not the captain of the ship, but rather he is second in command and the only one eligible to command the ship in the event the captain is unable to.

  • Oiler - A member of the ship’s engine department.

  • Pilot - Pilots were instructed to navigate other ships through hazardous waters outside the port of arrival. They were required to have a substantial knowledge of waterways, inlets, and other landmarks surrounding a particular port.

  • Ship Commercial Agent - Agents for shipping companies consigned or invested in commercial ships and their cargo as insurance for any loss that would be incurred during the voyage.

  • Ship Caulker - Caulkers worked with shipbuilders; they were specifically assigned to making the hull of a ship watertight.

  • Ship Master - The captain of the ship, but could also be the ship’s owner.

  • Shipwright - A builder and repairer of ships. Other terms for this occupation include shipbuilder, ship carpenter, and ship joiner.

Heading farther back in time and across the pond, there are even more peculiar names for occupations that originate in England. While perusing Rodney Hall’s “Index of Old Occupations,” I found some peculiar job titles held by persons in the maritime world. Shipwrights or ship builders used to be called a chippy. A jerquer was an officer at the customs house who searched ships, while a coast waiter surveyed arriving ships and their cargo. How about aquarius ewar, which happens to be a waterman or riverman, someone who ferried passengers across rivers and through tributaries.[2]

Sailor-loc-36950v
Image source: Library of Congress

Many of these terms have faded with history and are no longer in use. The website for the U.S. Census Bureau provides an index for occupations and industry used in the 2010 Census, which provides how various titles for seafarers are described today.[3] It is important for genealogists to investigate occupation titles when we are unsure or they are unfamiliar. In heavily stratified industries such as maritime, these occupations take on very specific roles and we can learn a lot about their day-to-day tasks at sea or in the harbor. Consider the fact also that your ancestor may have to find work elsewhere when the shipping industry was in a slump or on the decline. In 1860, my 3x great-grandfather Owen O’Neill stated his occupation title as sailor[4], but by 1870 he was working as a farmer.[5]

Have these or other peculiar occupation titles appeared in your own research? What sources did you utilize to find out more about their line of work? Learning about your ancestor’s job is a great way to bring his or her story to life.

 

 

[1] 1880 US Federal Census, Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, population schedule, 7th ward, enumeration district (ED) 142, page no. 19, dwelling 112, line 30, Major Thomas; Accessed on Ancestry.com (online database: 29 Jan 2016), image 19 of 66; citing NARA microfilm publication T9.

[2] Rodney Hall, “Hall Genealogy Website – Old Occupation Names,” last updated 22 Mar 2015. http://rmhh.co.uk/occup/index.html: accessed 6 Feb 2016.

[3] United States Census Bureau, “Industry and Occupation - Indexes,” https://www.census.gov/people/io/methodology/indexes.html: accessed 6 Feb 2016.

[4] 1860 US Federal Census, San Mateo County, California, population schedule, Belmont post office (Township no.3), p. 39, Eugine [Owen] O’Neill; NARA Publication M653, roll 65.

[5] 1870 US Federal Census, San Mateo County, California, population schedule, Belmont, p.1, dwelling 9, family no. 12, Owen O’Neill; NARA Publication M593, FHL microfilm 545,586.

----

Jake Fletcher is a genealogist and blogger. Jake has been researching and writing about genealogy since 2008 on his research blog Travelogues of a Genealogist. He currently volunteers as a research assistant at the National Archives in Waltham, Massachusetts and is Vice President of the New England Association of Professional Genealogists (NEAPG).


Register for Webinar Wednesday - The Scots-Irish in America by Peggy Lauritzen

2016-02-10-art
Many Americans can trace their ancestry back to the British Isles. Some have even heard that their background was “Scotch-Irish”. In this webinar, we will focus on who these people were and where they came from in the British Isles.

Logotransparent

Join us and Peggy Clemens Lauritzen for the live webinar Wednesday, February 10, 2016 at 9pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion.  

Registerbut 

Or register for multiple webinars at once by clicking here.

Not sure if you already registered?

Login to view your registration status for this webinar (available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers).

Test Your Webinar Connection

To ensure that your webinar connection is ready to go, click here.

Can't make it to the live event?

No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

PeggyLauritzen-144x144Peggy Clemens Lauritzen, AG, was involved in genealogy before she was even born. The daughter of avid genealogists, she was spending time in courthouses and cemeteries while other children were playing on swings and going to the beach. The love of her family’s history has never left her. With her experience as a former Family History Director, she is a frequent speaker at genealogical societies, workshops, seminars, and webinars where she loves bringing genealogy to life. Some of those would include The Ohio Genealogical Society, The Ohio State University, Brigham Young University, and many other state and local genealogy societies. She has recently completed several Legacy QuickGuides on Appalachia, which are also available on www.legacyfamilytree.com and www.amazon.com.

Add it to your Google Calendar

With our Google Calendar button, you will never forget our upcoming webinars. Simply click the button to add it to your calendar. You can then optionally embed the webinar events (and even turn them on and off) into your own personal calendar. If you have already added the calendar, you do not have to do it again - the new webinar events will automatically appear.

Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Wednesday, February 10, 2016 at:

  • 9pm Eastern (U.S.)
  • 8pm Central
  • 7pm Mountain
  • 6pm Pacific

Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email both 1 day and 1 hour prior to the live webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone.

We look forward to seeing you all there!