Previous month:
February 2016
Next month:
April 2016

FamilyBrowse - Another Way to Look at FamilySearch - new webinar by Mary Roddy now available

FamilySearch.org has millions of images on its website, many of which are unindexed and not yet searchable. But if you know how to get into the catalog and browse around, you can find the unindexed images of birth and death certificates, naturalization papers, deeds, wills, estate inventories and more. Learn tricks to get into the catalog, why using the map on the FamilySearch search page might not be the best way to find records, and learn about some of the many and varied indexing schemes used in county record books.

2016-03-31-image500blog

_WatchVideo

_WatchPreview

This webinar joins 9 other excellent FamilySearch webinars already available in the library: 

 Not a member yet?

Legacy Family Tree Webinars provides genealogy education where-you-are through live and recorded online webinars and videos. Learn from the best instructors in genealogy including Thomas MacEntee, Judy Russell, J. Mark Lowe, Lisa Louise Cooke, Megan Smolenyak, Tom Jones, and many more. Learn at your convenience. On-demand classes are available 24 hours a day! All you need is a computer or mobile device with an Internet connection.

Subscribe today and get access to this BONUS members-only webinar AND all of this:

  • All 334 classes in the library (480 hours of quality genealogy education)
  • 1,430 pages of instructors' handouts
  • Chat logs from the live webinars
  • Additional 5% off anything at FamilyTreeWebinars.com
  • Chance for a bonus subscribers-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Additional members-only webinars

It's just $49.95/year or $9.95/month.

Subscribe

 We've got a brand new line up of speakers for 2016! All live webinars are free to watch.

2016speakers3

Print the 2016 webinar brochure here.


Why Knowing Jurisdiction Leads To More Records

Pioneer Cabin in Grafton County New Hampshire

A couple months back in my post for Legacy News titled “Deconstructing The Deed,” I was able to showcase one of my favorite records that I found in my personal research. The genealogical treasure was a deed located in the Grafton County, New Hampshire land records naming my 5x great-grandfather Elisha Freeman and all of his siblings granting a tract of land to their sibling as a gift for taking care of their widowed mother. I remember the day of the discovery vividly over seven years ago. I was researching at the New England Historic Genealogical Society whose staff members were graciously working with me to research my family tree. One of the staff members gave me a tip that I don’t regret following.

They suggested that after looking in land index for Grafton County, I check Rockingham County’s index as well because the township of Hanover, in which my ancestors had been among the first settlers, was a part of Rockingham County. I didn’t hesitate to check those indexes as well and sure enough, I located two more land records, including a deed in which Elisha’s father, Sylvanus granted Elisha the original tract of land in Hanover he received as a proprietor of the township. Only recently did I begin to do a little research around why this turned out to be the case.

New Hampshire did not split into counties until 19 March 1771, when the colonial court divided the province into five counties; Cheshire, Grafton, Hillsborough, Rockingham, and Stratford.1 Of the two new deeds that I found, one preceded the formation of the counties and the other was created after in 1772. This was a head scratcher because I assumed that upon the creation of the county, the administrative and legal powers for selling land would be transferred to Grafton county and wouldn’t remain in Rockingham County.

My answer was resolved using local history sources and colonial legislation in the New Hampshire state papers. Upon creation of the five counties, the legal jurisdiction remained in Rockingham County because Grafton did not receive full county privileges. Settlement was sparse in these years, but after motions by Governor Wentworth and other statesmen, full county privileges would be granted to Grafton on 27 Jan 1773.For genealogists, this means that after 1773 your ancestor's deeds would be in Grafton County Register of Deeds, while any transactions previous to this are held in records of Rockingham County. 

Panoramic Map on Lebanon, Grafton County, New Hampshire
Panoramic Map on Lebanon, Grafton County, New Hampshire.
Photo: Library of Congress

Researching local history in relation to where our ancestors lived and understanding the jurisdiction of legal entities like the courts is critical to finding all the records. In particular with early New England, the county and state borders changed quite often and it can be confusing. So often the records are right under our nose, but we just happen to be looking in the wrong place for that time period.  In this case, I was thankful to receive a tip from a more knowledgeable expert than myself, one of the many advantages of visiting a genealogical library. For researchers who don’t always have this luxury, don’t be dismayed, because there are many resources online that can assist in this area of genealogical research:

FamilySearch Wiki

This has become my go-to resource whenever I begin researching in a location I am unfamiliar with. Even though some pages are a work in progress, the wiki pages for many counties are very accurate and thorough, making this an invaluable resource for researching local history and genealogy. A particularly good example would be Norfolk County, Massachusetts which lost and gained several towns over the years. The article features a very-detailed and nicely put together timeline displaying the changes in the county borders over the years.

Historical Laws of the States  

State laws and statutes are published on a regular basis by the state governments. As in my example, New Hampshire’s State and Legislative papers provided invaluable insight as to what county the records were held in at a particular time. A plethora of the older volumes are made available on digital public libraries like Google Books, Internet Archive, and Hathitrust Digital Library. These digitization projects not only provide bound volumes of historical laws, but also local histories published in the 19th and early 20th century, another great resource for genealogists. A smaller collection is also available on Family History Books from FamilySearch. The websites of state archives and libraries should also be consulted, because many have published their historical laws online as well.

AniMap Software

For those who are intimidated by legal records and may be more visual learners, the AniMap Software is a great choice for understanding county and state borders at a particular time and place. You can search your town of interest and see over time on your computer screen what county or colonial province the town belonged to, potentially leading you to.  Geoff Rasmussen gives a great tutorial of the program in his webinar, "Mapping Software for Genealogists" and the software is available in the Legacy Family Tree Store. A free version of the AniMap Software is integrated into a website called MapofUS.org, providing researchers with the changing county and state borders overtime for the 48 continental states. Within each page for each state, there are links to other historical maps and atlases that could prove useful in your research.  The one drawback is that it doesn’t allow you to pinpoint your exact township, something that’s only available in the full software.

Understanding where the legal jurisdiction existed in the time period we are researching can help solve brickwalls and lead to more records we hadn’t thought of checking previously. Don’t overlook the geography and law for the area in which your ancestor presided. It will lead to becoming a more thorough researcher.

 

1. Chase, Frederick and Lord, John K. ed. A History of Dartmouth College and the Town of Hanover, New Hampshire. 2 vols. (Cambridge, MA: John Wilson & Son, 1891), 422: accessed at Google Books.  

2. Bouton, Nathaniel D.D. ed. Provincial Papers: Documents and Records Relating to the Province of New Hampshire, From 1764 to 1776. Vol 7 of 40. (Nashua, NH: Orren C. Moore, State Printer, 1873.), 312: accessed at the website of the Secretary of State of New Hampshire, https://sos.nh.gov/nhsos_content.aspx?id=47297&terms=state%20papers

---


Jake Fletcher is a genealogist, lecturer, and blogger. Jake has been researching and writing about genealogy since 2008 on his research blog Travelogues of a Genealogist. He currently volunteers as a research assistant at the National Archives in Waltham, Massachusetts and is Vice President of the New England Association of Professional Genealogists (NEAPG).


Proof Arguments - How to Write Them and Why They Matter - free webinar by Warren Bittner now online for limited time

2016-03-30-image500blog

The recording of today's webinar, "Proof Arguments - How to Write Them and Why They Matter" by Warren Bittner is now available to view for free for a limited time at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com. 

See examples of analyzing and correlating evidence, and how to resolve conflicts in genealogical evidence to reach conclusions. The genealogist owes it to herself and future generations to write down the mental reasoning that leads to these conclusions. Learn how to write down the mental process of establishing genealogical proof.

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 44 minute recording of "Proof Arguments - How to Write Them and Why They Matter" PLUS the after-webinar party is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership.

Coupon code

Use webinar coupon code - proof - for 10% off anything at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com or www.LegacyFamilyTreeStore.com, valid through Monday, April 4, 2016.

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 333 classes, 479 hours of genealogy education)
  • On-demand access to the instructor handouts (now 1,418 pages)
  • On-demand access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Chance for a members-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
  • Ability to view which webinars you are registered for
  • Use of the playlist, resume watching, and jump-to features

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year
  • Monthly membership: $9.95/month

Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • Getting to Know Findmypast - Your Source for British and Irish Genealogy by Jen Baldwin. April 6.
  • Confirming Enslaved Ancestors Utilizing DNA by Melvin Collier. April 8.
  • U.S. Land Records - State Land States by Mary Hill. April 13.
  • Fire Insurance Maps - The Google Maps of Their Day by Jill Morelli. April 20.
  • England and Wales - Rummaging in the Parish Chests by Kirsty Gray. April 27.
  • Google Drive for Genealogists by Thomas MacEntee. May 4.
  • Dirty Pictures - Save Your Family Photos from Ruin by Denise Levenick. May 11.
  • Messages from the Grave - Listening to Your Ancestor's Tombstone by Elissa Scalise Powell. May 13.
  • Mining the Über-sites for German Ancestors by Jim Beidler. May 18.
  • Discover American Ancestors (NEHGS) by Lindsay Fulton. May 25.
  • Get the Most from AmericanAncestors.org by Claire Vail. June 1.
  • Researching Your Washington State Ancestors by Mary Roddy. June 8.
  • Introduction to the Freedmen's Bureau by Angela Walton-Raji. June 10.
  • Ticked Off! Those Pesky Pre-1850 Census Tic Marks by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen. June 15.
  • Digging Deeper in German Parish Records by Gail Blankenau. June 22.
  • Circles or Triangles? What Shape is Your DNA? by Diahan Southard. June 29.
  • Navigating Naturalization Records by Lisa Alzo. July 6.
  • A Genealogist's Guide to Heraldry by Shannon Combs-Bennett. July 13.
  • Finding French Ancestors by Luana Darby. July 15.
  • Organize Your Online Life by Lisa Louise Cooke. July 20.
  • Researching Women - Community Cookbooks and What They Tell Us About Our Ancestors by Gena Philibert-Ortega. July 27.
  • The Germanic French - Researching Alsatian and Lorrainian Families by John Philip Colletta. July 30.
  • Solutions for Missing and Scarce Records by Tom Jones. July 30.
  • Getting Started with Microsoft PowerPoint by Thomas MacEntee. August 3.
  • The Battle for Bounty Land - War of 1812 and Mexican-American Wars by Beth Foulk. August 10.
  • Homestead Act of 1862 - Following the Witnesses by Bernice Bennett. August 12.
  • Successfully Applying to a Lineage Society by Amy Johnson Crow. August 17.
  • Using Findmypast to Unlock Your Irish Ancestry by Brian Donovan. August 24.
  • The Treasure Trove in Legislative Petitions by Judy Russell. September 14.
  • Clooz - A Document-Based Software Companion by Richard Thomas. September 16.
  • How to Use FamilySearch.org for Beginners by Devin Ashby. September 21.
  • Beginning Polish Genealogy by Lisa Alzo and Jonathan Shea. September 28.
  • AHA! Analysis of Handwriting for Genealogical Research by Ron Arons. October 5.
  • Time and Place - Using Genealogy's Cross-Hairs by Jim Beidler. October 12.
  • Finding Your Ancestors' German Hometown by Ursula Krause. October 14.
  • Social History Websites That Bring Your Ancestor's Story to Life by Gena Philibert-Ortega. October 19.
  • Flip for Flickr - Share, Store and Save Your Family Photos by Maureen Taylor. October 26.
  • Analysis and Correlation - Two Keys to Sound Conclusions by Chris Staats. November 2.
  • Publishing a Genealogy E-Book by Thomas MacEntee. November 9.
  • Dating Family Photographs by Jane Neff Rollins. November 16.
  • Nature & Nurture - Family History for Adoptees by Janet Hovorka and Amy Slade. November 18.
  • Multi-Media Story Telling by Devin Ashby. November 30.
  • Becoming a Genealogy Detective by Sharon Atkins. December 7.
  • From the Heartland - Utilizing Online Resources in Midwest Research by Luana Darby. December 14.
  • Tracing Your European Ancestors by Julie Goucher. December 16.
  • An Introduction to BillionGraves by Garth Fitzner. December 21.

Click here to register.

Print the 2016 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


FamilySearch Records Update: New records for Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Japan, and United States

FamilySearch Records Update3

Explore the new record collections for Denmark Deeds and Mortgages 1572-1928, Czech Republic School Registers 1799-1953, United States War of 1812 Index to Service Records 1812-1815, and more than 7 million additions to the Find A Grave Index. Search these and more by following the links below.

COLLECTION

INDEXED RECORDS

DIGITAL RECORDS

COMMENTS

Belgium Antwerp Civil Registration 1588-1913

5,142

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Belgium Brabant Civil Registration 1582-1914

28,028

2,055

Added indexed records and images to an existing collection

Belgium East Flanders Civil Registration 1541-1914

41,927

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Belgium Hainaut Civil Registration 1600-1913

4,729

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Belgium Liège Civil Registration 1621-1914

5,655

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Belgium West Flanders Civil Registration 1582-1910

43,815

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Czech Republic School Registers 1799-1953

0

1,158,164

Added images to an existing collection

Denmark Deeds and Mortgages 1572-1928

0

2,993,164

Added images to an existing collection

Find A Grave Index

7,586,038

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Japan Genealogies 850-2012

0

59,303

Added images to an existing collection

Japan Village Records 709-1982

0

223,187

Added images to an existing collection

South Carolina Georgetown Passenger Lists 1904-1942

1,302

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Texas and Arizona Arrivals 1903-1910

59,299

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

United States Passport Applications 1795-1925

38,025

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

United States War of 1812 Index to Service Records 1812-1815

1,130,851

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Help Us Publish More Free Records Online

Searchable historical records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of online volunteers worldwide. These volunteers transcribe (or index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are always needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published weekly online on FamilySearch.org. Learn how you can volunteer to help provide free access to the world’s historical genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/Indexing. 

About FamilySearch International

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.


Register for Webinar Wednesday - Proof Arguments: How to Write Them and Why They Matter by Warren Bittner

Register

See examples of analyzing and correlating evidence, and how to resolve conflicts in genealogical evidence to reach conclusions. The genealogist owes it to herself and future generations to write down the mental reasoning that leads to these conclusions. Learn how to write down the mental process of establishing genealogical proof.

Logotransparent

Join us and Warren Bittner for the live webinar Wednesday, March 30, 2016 at 2pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion. 

 

Registerbut 

Or register for multiple webinars at once by clicking here.

Not sure if you already registered?

Login to view your registration status for this webinar (available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers).

Test Your Webinar Connection

To ensure that your webinar connection is ready to go, click here.

Can't make it to the live event?

No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

WarrenBittner-144x144F. Warren Bittner, CGSM, is a genealogical researcher and lecturer, with thirty years of research experience. He holds a Master of Science degree in history from Utah State University, and a Bachelors of Science degree in Business from Brigham Young University. His master’s thesis looked at the social factors affecting illegitimacy in nineteenth-century Bavaria. He is fluent in Mandarin Chinese, and in 1989-1990 he studied Chinese at a graduate level at the Inter-University Program for Chinese Language Studies in Taipei, Taiwan, R.O.C.

He is the owner of Ancestors Lost and Found, a small genealogical research firm. For six years he was the German Collection Manager for the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, where he coordinated contracts to microfilm and index records at 102 archives in seven countries and where he planned the German book acquisitions and internet publications. Before that he worked for four years in the extraction unit of the Family History Library, where he was coordinator of third-party indexing projects and where he developed and trained volunteers in Spanish indexing projects. He has also worked as a Reference Consultant at the Family History Library on both the U.S. and International reference counters. He has done research in more than fifty German archives and in more than forty U.S. archives and record repositories.

In 2010 he was assistant director of the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy and he is a former member of the board of directors for Utah Genealogical Association. He made several appearances on the PBS television series, Ancestors 2. He is a member of the Association of Professional Genealogists, the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society, the National Genealogical Society, Mid-Atlantic Germanic Society, and the Palatines to America, Colorado Chapter, and the Sacrament German Society. He is married to Nancy Ruth Christensen and is the father of three children.

Add it to your Google Calendar

With our Google Calendar button, you will never forget our upcoming webinars. Simply click the button to add it to your calendar. You can then optionally embed the webinar events (and even turn them on and off) into your own personal calendar. If you have already added the calendar, you do not have to do it again - the new webinar events will automatically appear.

Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Wednesday, March 30, 2016 at:

  • 2pm Eastern (U.S.)
  • 1pm Central
  • 12pm Mountain
  • 11am Pacific
  • 6pm GMT

Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email both 1 day and 1 hour prior to the live webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone.

We look forward to seeing you all there!


Why Do We Do Genealogy?

A friend asked an interesting question. "Why do you do genealogy?" The answer should be simple. One would think it would be something along the lines of:

"I do genealogy because I want to know who my ancestors were."

Why do we do Genealogy?
But guess what? Like most questions in life, the answer is not that simple. There are a myriad of reasons why we delve into genealogy research. Wanting to find out who our ancestors were is just the tip of the genealogy iceberg.

The reasons I currently "do genealogy" are not the same reasons I had twenty or thirty years ago. When I began my genealogy quest it was because my father had repeatedly expressed curiousity about our Irish origins. He died when I was 14 years old, and after his death I vowed to find out about our Irish McGinnis ancestors.

So my answer to that question, had it been asked those many years ago, would have been. "I do genealogy because I want to remember and honour my father."

It was a specific reason, very narrow in scope, but it sparked a broader interest in history. In fact, that is not my main reason anymore, and hasn’t been for a long time. I've grown. Genealogy has been a journey, and as on any journey, my needs and desires and goals along the way have changed.

For example I’m extremely curious. Some would say nosy. I think most of us who love genealogy would make great detectives. My personality is such that I can't let a mystery lie without digging into it. I need to find answers.

So my current answer to the original question of why I do genealogy is now much more complex.

"I do genealogy for many reasons. One is my curiousity about my ancestors - who were they, what were they like, what experiences did they live through. My love of history is part of the reason I do genealogy. My desire to solve mysteries is a huge part of my passion for genealogy. And I do genealogy because I want my children and grandchildren to know and recognize the individuals over the centuries whose lives helped make us who we are today."

Born Died written in sand


Genealogy isn't a pursuit well suited for those who require instant gratification. It's a long-term process and to those who are not like-minded it seems an incomprehensible pursuit. I've spent more hours scrolling through microfilm searching for that one entry with an ancestor's name, then I care to remember. Many people would consider those wasted hours. I don't.

Some of my family are not the least bit interested in our ancestors. Some are interested to a degree. Tell them stories of the more interesting or outrageous ancestors such as our daredevil Peer ancestor who walked Niagara Falls on a tightrope and they listen. Tell them about great great grandpa, the farmer in England, and their eyes glaze over. 

I once had a friend say to me "But why do you care? They're all dead!" I care because they made me who I am. Without them I would not be here. They are part of me, part of my genetic makeup. They also deserve to be remembered, and to continue to be part of our lives. Our children and grandchildren need to hear about those ancestors. They need to speak of them to their children, and to carry on the stories they hear from me.


Some of my relatives are not interested in my treasured photos of our ancestors. To me those are the icing on the cake! Photos make my ancestor come alive. One of my relatives told me she wasn't interested in seeing a photo of our 2nd great-grandfather. Why wasn't she interested? Because, she said "Why do I care what he looked like? I never knew him."

Why do we do genealogy?
That absolute lack of curiousity is incomprehensible to me, just as my desire to know more is incomprehensible to her. A photo allows us to know our ancestors. With a photo in my hand I can study a face then ponder over whether or not great-grandma's nose is just like my granddaughter’s.  I can visualize the ancestors in those photos living their daily lives, just as we do today. With a photo I feel a connection I can’t quite feel with only a name and a date.

I’ve been asked when my research will be done. Many family members want to know why I am still looking when I know the names of ancestors back several generations. Non-genealogists rarely understand that genealogists want to find as many details and as much information about each ancestor as they possibly can.

Even though my answer to the original question is complex and multi-faceted, I can sum my reasons up in one sentence:

Without the past there is no present, nor can we build a future.

How would you answer my friend's question, "Why do you do genealogy?"

 

Lorine McGinnis Schulze is a Canadian genealogist who has been involved with genealogy and history for more than thirty years. In 1996 Lorine created the Olive Tree Genealogy website and its companion blog. Lorine is the author of many published genealogical and historical articles and books.

 


Introduction to German Parish Records - free webinar by Gail Blankenau now available for limited time

2016-03-23-image500

The recording of Wednesday's webinar, "Introduction to German Parish Records" by Gail Blankenau is now available to view for free for a limited time at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com. 

Few researchers realize that many early federal and state laws were private laws -specifically for the benefit of individuals or families. The records can be fabulous for genealogists. Learn how to find these genealogical gems in federal and state collections.

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 44 minute recording of "The Private Laws of the Federal and State Governments" PLUS the after-webinar party is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership.

Coupon code

Use webinar coupon code - germany16 - for 10% off anything at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com or www.LegacyFamilyTreeStore.com, valid through Monday, March 28, 2016.

 

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 329 classes, 473 hours of genealogy education)
  • On-demand access to the instructor handouts (now 1,411 pages)
  • On-demand access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Chance for a members-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
  • Ability to view which webinars you are registered for
  • Use of the playlist, resume watching, and jump-to features

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year
  • Monthly membership: $9.95/month

Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • Proof Arguments - How to Write Them and Why They Matter by Warren Bittner. March 30.
  • Getting to Know Findmypast - Your Source for British and Irish Genealogy by Jen Baldwin. April 6.
  • Confirming Enslaved Ancestors Utilizing DNA by Melvin Collier. April 8.
  • U.S. Land Records - State Land States by Mary Hill. April 13.
  • Fire Insurance Maps - The Google Maps of Their Day by Jill Morelli. April 20.
  • England and Wales - Rummaging in the Parish Chests by Kirsty Gray. April 27.
  • Google Drive for Genealogists by Thomas MacEntee. May 4.
  • Dirty Pictures - Save Your Family Photos from Ruin by Denise Levenick. May 11.
  • Messages from the Grave - Listening to Your Ancestor's Tombstone by Elissa Scalise Powell. May 13.
  • Mining the Über-sites for German Ancestors by Jim Beidler. May 18.
  • Discover American Ancestors (NEHGS) by Lindsay Fulton. May 25.
  • Get the Most from AmericanAncestors.org by Claire Vail. June 1.
  • Researching Your Washington State Ancestors by Mary Roddy. June 8.
  • Introduction to the Freedmen's Bureau by Angela Walton-Raji. June 10.
  • Ticked Off! Those Pesky Pre-1850 Census Tic Marks by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen. June 15.
  • Digging Deeper in German Parish Records by Gail Blankenau. June 22.
  • Circles or Triangles? What Shape is Your DNA? by Diahan Southard. June 29.
  • Navigating Naturalization Records by Lisa Alzo. July 6.
  • A Genealogist's Guide to Heraldry by Shannon Combs-Bennett. July 13.
  • Finding French Ancestors by Luana Darby. July 15.
  • Organize Your Online Life by Lisa Louise Cooke. July 20.
  • Researching Women - Community Cookbooks and What They Tell Us About Our Ancestors by Gena Philibert-Ortega. July 27.
  • The Germanic French - Researching Alsatian and Lorrainian Families by John Philip Colletta. July 30.
  • Solutions for Missing and Scarce Records by Tom Jones. July 30.
  • Getting Started with Microsoft PowerPoint by Thomas MacEntee. August 3.
  • The Battle for Bounty Land - War of 1812 and Mexican-American Wars by Beth Foulk. August 10.
  • Homestead Act of 1862 - Following the Witnesses by Bernice Bennett. August 12.
  • Successfully Applying to a Lineage Society by Amy Johnson Crow. August 17.
  • Using Findmypast to Unlock Your Irish Ancestry by Brian Donovan. August 24.
  • The Treasure Trove in Legislative Petitions by Judy Russell. September 14.
  • Clooz - A Document-Based Software Companion by Richard Thomas. September 16.
  • How to Use FamilySearch.org for Beginners by Devin Ashby. September 21.
  • Beginning Polish Genealogy by Lisa Alzo and Jonathan Shea. September 28.
  • AHA! Analysis of Handwriting for Genealogical Research by Ron Arons. October 5.
  • Time and Place - Using Genealogy's Cross-Hairs by Jim Beidler. October 12.
  • Finding Your Ancestors' German Hometown by Ursula Krause. October 14.
  • Social History Websites That Bring Your Ancestor's Story to Life by Gena Philibert-Ortega. October 19.
  • Flip for Flickr - Share, Store and Save Your Family Photos by Maureen Taylor. October 26.
  • Analysis and Correlation - Two Keys to Sound Conclusions by Chris Staats. November 2.
  • Publishing a Genealogy E-Book by Thomas MacEntee. November 9.
  • Dating Family Photographs by Jane Neff Rollins. November 16.
  • Nature & Nurture - Family History for Adoptees by Janet Hovorka and Amy Slade. November 18.
  • Multi-Media Story Telling by Devin Ashby. November 30.
  • Becoming a Genealogy Detective by Sharon Atkins. December 7.
  • From the Heartland - Utilizing Online Resources in Midwest Research by Luana Darby. December 14.
  • Tracing Your European Ancestors by Julie Goucher. December 16.
  • An Introduction to BillionGraves by Garth Fitzner. December 21.

Click here to register.

Print the 2016 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


Tuesday's Tip - Why add an unlinked individual?

  Why add an unlinked individual in Legacy Family Tree?


Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

Why add an unlinked individual?

Right now, most of the people in your Legacy Family Tree database are probably linked to you. Another way to say it is that they are all related to you in some way no matter how distant. Sometimes you need to add someone to your database who isn't related to you - or at least you can't figure out how - yet!  In a case like this you can add an unlinked individual in Legacy.

I've been working on my personal file and I have a perfect example of why you would want to add an unlinked individual.

I am looking at the civil registry books on the Köln Archives website. I am trying to find the marriage certificate and the death certificate of Catharina (Müller) Bodenheim because I do not know who her parents are. Her parents should be listed on both of these documents (Germans are thorough).

Bodenheim isn't a common name in Köln so every one I run across is of interest to me. I have found a couple of people already that were known to me but I didn't have their documents (now I do), but I just found this death certificate...

Friedrich Adolf Bodenheim born 17 Jan 1888 and died 29 Jun 1943. His parents are listed as Theodor Bodenheim and Sophia (Kröll) Bodenheim. He is listed as being widowed with his wife being Anna Sophia (Hövel) Bodenheim. All of this on one document!

 

New unlinked individual in Legacy Family Tree
New unlinked individual in Legacy Family Tree

 
There is no way I am going to pass this information up. Friedrich has to be related somehow but I have no idea how yet.

All I have to do is go to ADD > ADD UNLINKED > ADD MALE to add Friedrich. I will then link his parents and his wife to him and he will be a little mini tree in my file. His little mini tree will be completely sourced and the death certificate will be attached to his death field. In the meantime, if I find more documents for his family I can continue to grow his little mini tree. One day I will figure out who he is and then it is a simple matter of linking him to where he belongs.

By the way, what do you think my next move will be? I will connect to FamilySearch and see if my new friend Friedrich is there and if not I will add him (he wasn't so I did). If he had been there I might have gotten a clue as to how he fits in. Now that I have added him I will know if anyone manipulates him in anyway because my green arrow will turn red.

 

Friedrich Adolf Bodenheim viewed in Legacy's FamilySearch screen
Friedrich Adolf Bodenheim viewed in Legacy's FamilySearch screen

 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips checkout the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis is part of the technical support team at Millennia, the makers of the Legacy Family Tree software program. With over 20 years of research experience, Michele’s passion is helping new genealogists get started on the right foot through her writings, classes and lectures. She is the former staff genealogist and weekly columnist for the McDuffie Mirror and now authors Ancestoring, a blog geared toward the beginner/intermediate researcher.

 

 

 


New Legacy QuickGuide Now Available - Deciphering Germanic Script: Common Words in Church Books

Legacy QuickGuidesTM have quickly become one of the more popular resources for genealogists. Each guide contains four (sometimes five, sometimes more) pages of valuable information covering a variety of genealogy research topics, dozens of clickable links, and are written by genealogists and family historians who are experts in the subject areas. We've added a brand new Legacy QuickGuide: Deciphering Germanic Script: Common Words in Church Books by Gail Blankenau. Now choose from 93 Legacy QuickGuides!

Deciphering Germanic Script: Common Words in Church Books by Gail Blankenau - $2.95  

Deciphering Germainc ScriptChurch books are critical for researching German genealogy but deciphering the script can be very difficult! Because Germany was not a unified country until 1871, there are many dialect words found in these records. In this new Legacy QuickGuidesTM, Gail Blankenau takes you through tips and tricks to make the process of understanding those words easier. In addition, she includes 4 pages of actual German script to use as examples when conducting your own research.
 
German Script Examples by Gail Blankenau
 
The Deciphering Germanic Script: Common Words in Church Books Legacy QuickGuide™ contains valuable research strategy to help you find your German ancestors This handy 5-page PDF guide can be used on your computer or mobile device for anytime access.
 
Buybutton-144 

Now choose from 92!

Purchase for just $2.95

Buybutton-144

United States - State Guides

United States - other Guides

Canada

United Kingdom

Europe

Religion

General


Register for Webinar Wednesday - Introduction to German Parish Records by Gail Blankenau

Register

Gail Shaffer Blankenau will introduce you to the gold mine of German genealogy--German church books, both in the United States and in the Germanic states. She discusses proven strategies to identify your ancestor’s home church and how to approach the records when you find them—even if you don’t speak German.

Logotransparent

Join us and Gail Blankenau for the live webinar Wednesday, March 23, 2016 at 2pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion. 

Download the syllabus

In preparation for the webinar, download the supplemental syllabus materials here. The syllabus is available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers. Log in here or subscribe here.

Registerbut 

Or register for multiple webinars at once by clicking here.

Not sure if you already registered?

Login to view your registration status for this webinar (available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers).

Test Your Webinar Connection

To ensure that your webinar connection is ready to go, click here.

Can't make it to the live event?

No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

GailBlankenau-144x144Gail Blankenau is an experienced genealogist, speaker and author. Her publications include articles in the New England Historical and Genealogical Register and The Genealogist. She is also a contributor to Family Chronicle and Internet Genealogy magazines. Based in Nebraska, she specializes in Nebraska records, Midwestern roots, German genealogy, land records, 19th-Century photographs and tracing lineages. More than half her ancestors came from New England, but she has roots in almost every state east of the Mississippi.

Add it to your Google Calendar

With our Google Calendar button, you will never forget our upcoming webinars. Simply click the button to add it to your calendar. You can then optionally embed the webinar events (and even turn them on and off) into your own personal calendar. If you have already added the calendar, you do not have to do it again - the new webinar events will automatically appear.

Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Wednesday, March 23, 2016 at:

  • 2pm Eastern (U.S.)
  • 1pm Central
  • 12pm Mountain
  • 11am Pacific
  • 6pm GMT

Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email both 1 day and 1 hour prior to the live webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone.

We look forward to seeing you all there!