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October 2019

New "Member Friday" Webinar - Online German Church Registers, Duplicates and Substitutes by James M. Beidler

New "Member Friday" Webinar - Online German Church Registers, Duplicates and Substitutes by James M. Beidler

Every Friday we're pleased to offer Legacy Family Tree Webinar subscribers a new bonus webinar just for them! This Friday enjoy "Online German Church Registers, Duplicates and Substitutes" by James M. Beidler. 

Online German Church Registers, Duplicates and Substitutes

No genealogist with German-speaking ancestors avoids using church records, and the good news is that many more of them are coming online in digital form. It’s important, however, to know whether you’re looking at originals, duplicates or extracts from these records – this presentation will explain the differences.

Online German Church Registers, Duplicates and Substitutes by James M. Beidler


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About the Presenter

James BeidlerJames M. Beidler is the author of several commercially published books and writes “Roots & Branches,” an award-winning weekly newspaper column and blog (www.roots-branches.com)  on genealogy. He is also a columnist for German Life magazine and a research-reports editor for Legacy Tree Genealogists.  

Beidler is also frequent contributor to other periodicals ranging from scholarly journals such as The Pennsylvania Genealogical Magazine to popular-interest magazines such as Family Tree Magazine. He also wrote the chapter on genealogy for Pennsylvania: A History of the Commonwealth, published jointly by the Penn State Press and the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission.  

As a lecturer, he was a part of the Pennsylvania Humanities Council's acclaimed Commonwealth Speakers program from 2002 to 2009, and has been a presenter at numerous conferences. In addition to being a member of numerous genealogical, historical, and lineage societies, Beidler also sits on Pennsylvania's State Historic Records Advisory Board as well as the selection committee for the Pennsylvania Digital Newspaper Project.  

Beidler was born in Reading, PA, and raised in nearby Berks County, where he currently resides and is an eighth-generation member of Bern Reformed United Church of Christ. He graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Hofstra University in Long Island, NY, with a BA in Political Science in 1982.

See all the webinars by James Beidler in the Legacy library.
 
Not a member yet?

Legacy Family Tree Webinars provides genealogy education where-you-are through live and recorded online webinars and videos. Learn from the best instructors in genealogy including Thomas MacEntee, Judy Russell, J. Mark Lowe, Lisa Louise Cooke, Megan Smolenyak, Tom Jones, and many more. Learn at your convenience. On-demand classes are available 24 hours a day! All you need is a computer or mobile device with an Internet connection.

Subscribe today and get access to this BONUS members-only webinar AND all of this:

  • All 1,058 classes in the library (1,341 hours of quality genealogy education)
  • 4,584 pages of instructors' handouts
  • Chat logs from the live webinars
  • Additional 5% off anything at FamilyTreeWebinars.com
  • Chance for a bonus subscribers-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Additional members-only webinars

It's just $49.95/year.


Soldier’s Homes (1865-1930): Caring for our Veterans - free webinar by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA, now online for limited time

Soldier’s Homes (1865-1930): Caring for our Veterans - free webinar by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA, now online for limited time

The recording of Wednesday's webinar, "Soldier’s Homes (1865-1930): Caring for our Veterans” by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA, is now available to view at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com for free for a limited time.

Webinar Description

The National Home for Volunteer Soldiers, was established by an act of Congress in 1865. The purpose of the home system (initially called the National Asylum) was to provide for the care of the large number of wounded and disabled veterans from the Civil War. Records of kinship and other treasures abound in these records—over 400,000 records of these veterans are online free of charge. The home from its inception was intended to be more like a planned community of today, than a simple home and hospital. Extensive amenities and vocational training were provided. The largest branch and showpiece of the system was the Central Branch at Dayton, Ohio, Eventually growing to 11 homes or branches spread across the country, they are today Veteran’s Administration hospitals. Additionally, state and Confederate homes were established. We will also discuss strategies for finding these records.
 
View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 31 minute recording of "Soldier’s Homes (1865-1930): Caring for our Veterans" is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. If you have a webinar membership, it is available anytime.

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 1,057 classes, 1,341 hours of genealogy education)
  • On-demand access to the instructor handouts (now 4,584 pages)
  • On-demand access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Chance for a members-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
  • Ability to view which webinars you are registered for
  • Use of the playlist, resume watching, and jump-to features

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year

Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

Native American Research: Things You May Not Know 11/19/2019

Paula Stuart-Warren, CG, FMGS, FUGA

MyHeritage's SuperSearch (German) 11/20/2019

Silvia da Silva

A la Karte: Borders, Maps and Gazetteers for German Genealogists 11/20/2019

James M. Beidler

No Will? No Problem! 11/22/2019

Sharon Monson

MyHeritage: les fonctionnalités à utiliser absolument (French) 11/25/2019

Elisabeth Zetland

Genealogie voor beginners: hoe start ik mijn familiestamboom op MyHeritage? (Dutch) 11/25/2019

Willeke Binnendijk

MyHeritage DNA - en oversikt (Norwegian) 11/26/2019

Yael Beck

I Received DNA Matches, Now What? 11/26/2019

Daniel Horowitz

Buried Treasures: What's in the English Parish Chest 12/3/2019

Paul Milner

Marriages Here, There, and Nowhere: Finding Gretna Greens and Borders 12/17/2019

J. Mark Lowe, CG, FUGA

Print the 2019 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


Using Newspaper Resources on FamilySearch

Recently I wrote an article called Navigating Newspaper Research and one of our readers asked a really good question that needs to be explored.

James Stevenson wrote:

    I have missed something along the way and came to a dead-end. I have not made much use of FamilySearch and perhaps that is the problem. When you say, "Now, you’ll notice FamilySearch is not on the above list. FamilySearch doesn’t have newspapers per se but they still should be searched. Check the FamilySearch Catalog first. You can search by the Place your ancestor lived in and then the category Newspapers." I thought I was going to  be able to search newspapers or at least indexes. In clicking on the link "FamilySearch Catalog" I can indeed put in a place name and then see a list of newspapers (categories) associated with that place, but what then? I was not able to see how to search for my ancestor's name in the newspapers. Perhaps you could elaborate. Thank you.

Sure! I can definitely elaborate on using FamilySearch for newspaper research. Let’s take a look at what it can and cannot provide you in terms of your research.

First, it’s important to remember that FamilySearch has databases, digitized items, and catalog entries. The “newspaper records” on FamilySearch are likely going to be in the form of the latter two, digitized items and catalog entries. The Catalog entries will list sources found in books or on microforms (microfilm or microfiche). So what that means is that if it’s found in a catalog entry, it will not be automatically searchable or browseable. You will need to either go to the Family History Library or one of its branches (if that’s where the item is located) to view it. You could also ask or hire someone else to view it for you. The FamilySearch Catalog also provides the option to find items in other libraries using WorldCat (more on that below).

Second, FamilySearch does not have actual newspapers. What they do have are books of indexes and abstracts. Prior to the days of digitized newspaper websites, this type of resource was invaluable to learning that an ancestor’s vital record information was printed in a newspaper. While indexes are not the best source because of the errors they can contain, they can be valuable finding aids.

FS Catalog

So let’s take a look at some examples. Let’s do a FamilySearch Catalog search for the state of North Carolina. When we do a Catalog search this is what we see in terms of the subject Newspapers.

North Carolina Newspapers

Notice that the subject categories include:

  • Newspapers
  • Newspapers - Bibliography
  • Newspapers - Indexes
  • Newspapers – Sources

But , also notice that there is also a category for Obituaries and Obituaries- indexes that also contain items from newspapers. So it’s important to go beyond just the Newspaper category.

Now, if I click on Newspapers, it expands to show me these results.

Newspapers expanded

As I look through the list I need to evaluate what looks like it might be helpful to my research. Clicking on any entry will help with that decision should the title be too generic. For the sake of our example, let’s go ahead and click on “Abstracts of births, deaths, marriages and other items of interest from Mount Airy, North Carolina newspapers."

Mount Airey Example

In this case, this is available as a book at the Library and it is not available online. So I need to figure out a way to access it.

Mount Airey Example with arrow to WorldCat

I can  check WorldCat to see if the book is available closer to where I live in Southern California. All I need to do is click on the WorldCat link (see my red arrow above). I will be redirected to the WorldCat website and a card catalog view of the book I’m looking at. If I enter my zip code the website will reveal what libraries nearest me have that item. In this case, I‘m in luck since it is at a FamilySearch Library branch about 40 miles from where I live. I can take a trip out there to look at the book and see if it has the information I need.

WorldCat example

Now, once I do that, it’s important to remember that this book was filled with abstracts, not the original newspaper articles. So I need to note the information I find and then see if I can track down the newspaper that originally published that article. Why? Because abstracts can be filled with errors.

In some cases, the Family History Library copy is the only one available.  If so, you may want to consider hiring a researcher to do a look-up, ask a friend who is going to Salt Lake for a favor, or plan your own trip.

You may get lucky and find that the item you need is digitized as in this example from North Carolina.

Digitized

I can click on the word “here” in the red sentence above and see the item I want. Please remember that in order to see digitized items you must be signed into your free FamilySearch account.

FS Digitized example 2

So FamilySearch either can provide you a way to find an ancestor in a resource via digitized books or records or they will have items in the Library, Family History Centers, or FamilySearch Libraries that you can research in person.

Not everything is online, but FamilySearch allows you to identify what you need for your research and then it's up to you to plan your next steps to acquiring it.

Thanks for the question James!

 

Gena Philibert-Ortega is an author, instructor, and researcher. She blogs at Gena's Genealogy and Food.Family.Ephemera. You can find her presentations on the Legacy Family Tree Webinars website.

 


Tuesday's Tip - Internet Toolbar (Beginner)

TT - Internet Toolbar

Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

Internet Toolbar (Beginner)

Internet Toolbar
(click image to enlarge)

 

Some users don't realize that the Web Pages Creation Tool is on the Internet Toolbar. The first five icons are the five different styles of web pages you can create.  Creating web pages is very similar to creating a report. The screens will be familiar to you. Please note that you must have your own web space on the Internet and you must use an FTP client to upload them. Some web servers have built in FTP clients but if not, we recommend the free FileZilla program. This is what we use here at Legacy. 

This isn't the only way you can do web pages. You can upload a gedcom to any of the "tree" websites. Another option is to use The Next Generation of Genealogy Site Building (TNG). You must have your own web space for this one. This is the program that the Guild of One Name Studies (GOONS) uses for their member websites. Many GOONs use Legacy. Your web space must have PHP/MySQL capability. TNG does offer web space.  

The Search the Internet is a great time saver. Legacy will auto fill in all the fields that that particular website needs. There are many default websites already programmed in for you but you can also add your own. For more information on that please consult the Help File.

Search the Internet
(click image to enlarge)

 

For some reason users miss the little down arrow next to the Find a Grave icon. There are some very useful searches here. 

Find a Grave
(click image to enlarge)

 

Next time we will take a look at the My Toolbar.

 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips check out the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis, CG® is part of the Legacy Family Tree team at MyHeritage. She handles the enhancement suggestions that come in from our users as well as writing for Legacy News. You can usually find her hanging out on the Legacy User Group Facebook page answering questions and posting tips.

 

 


Register for Webinar Wednesday - Soldier's Homes (1865-1930) Caring for our veterans by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA

Register
 
The National Home for Volunteer Soldiers, was established by an act of Congress in 1865. The purpose of the home system (initially called the National Asylum) was to provide for the care of the large number of wounded and disabled veterans from the Civil War. Records of kinship and other treasures abound in these records—over 400,000 records of these veterans are online free of charge. The home from its inception was intended to be more like a planned community of today, than a simple home and hospital. Extensive amenities and vocational training were provided. The largest branch and showpiece of the system was the Central Branch at Dayton, Ohio, Eventually growing to 11 homes or branches spread across the country, they are today Veteran’s Administration hospitals. Additionally, state and Confederate homes were established. We will also discuss strategies for finding these records.
 
Join us and Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA for the live webinar Wednesday, November 13, at 8pm eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion. 

Registerbut 

Or register for multiple webinars at once by clicking here.

Not sure if you already registered?

Login to view your registration status for this webinar (available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers).

Test Your Webinar Connection

To ensure that your webinar connection is ready to go, click here.

Can't make it to the live event?

No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA, is a long-time researcher and instructor in genealogical topics. Rick is also a retired colonel having served 31 years in the U.S. Army. Rick and his wife Pam coordinate the Advanced Land course and Researching in Washington, D.C., without Leaving Home offered by the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy (SLIG) and the Advanced Land course at Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh (GRIP). Rick co-coordinates with Judy Russell, JD, CG, CGL, the Law School for Genealogists at GRIP and the FHL Law Library course at SLIG. He also coordinates the Using Maps in Genealogy course at SLIG. Rick also instructs in the Advanced Methodology course offered by SLIG.  He also lectures at national conferences and presents nationwide seminars. His areas of expertise encompass records of the National Archives, the Bureau of Land Management, and the Daughters of the American Revolution, including military records, land records, using maps in genealogy, urban research, and government documents. Rick is experienced in the localities of western Pennsylvania and Ohio. Rick is also a trustee of the Board for Certification of Genealogists. He is also the immediate past president of BCG.

Add it to your Google Calendar

With our Google Calendar button, you will never forget our upcoming webinars. Simply click the button to add it to your calendar. You can then optionally embed the webinar events (and even turn them on and off) into your own personal calendar. If you have already added the calendar, you do not have to do it again - the new webinar events will automatically appear.

Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Wednesday, November 13, 2019 at:

  • 8pm Eastern (U.S.)
  • 7pm Central
  • 6pm Mountain
  • 5pm Pacific

Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email both 1 day and 1 hour prior to the live webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone. 

 

We look forward to seeing you all there!


New "Member Friday" Webinar - Famous DNA: Looking into the genetic history of Joseph Smith Jr. by Ugo Perego, PhD

New "Member Friday" Webinar - Famous DNA: Looking into the genetic history of Joseph Smith Jr. by Ugo Perego, PhD

Every Friday we're pleased to offer Legacy Family Tree Webinar subscribers a new bonus webinar just for them! This Friday enjoy "Famous DNA: Looking into the genetic history of Joseph Smith Jr., founder of Mormonism" by Ugo Perego, PhD. 

Famous DNA: Looking into the genetic history of Joseph Smith Jr., founder of Mormonism

This is a review of nearly 20 years of research work about Joseph Smith Jr. and his family using DNA tools. This case study is also helpful to see DNA in action and how it
can be applied to anyone's own personal family history research. It includes Y chromosome testing to trace both the origin of this particular Smith family and issues regarding alleged posterity; mitochondrial DNA to learn about their ancient maternal origins; and a unique, more than 180 years old paternity case using autosomal DNA.

Famous DNA: Looking into the genetic history of Joseph Smith Jr. by Ugo Perego, PhD


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About the Presenter

Ugo Perego PhDDr. Ugo A. Perego is the owner of the Genetic Genealogy Consultant services, which specializes in helping genealogists with all their DNA needs. He is also a visiting scientist affiliated with the DNA laboratory of Professors Alessandro Achilli and Antonio Torroni at the University of Pavia in Italy, working on human population genetics. He has previously worked for more than a decade as a senior researcher with the Sorenson Molecular Genealogy Foundation and GeneTree.com both based in Utah. Ugo earned a BSc and an MSc in Health Sciences at Brigham Young University (Provo, Utah) and a PhD in Genetic and Biomolecular Sciences at the University of Pavia, Italy. Ugo has contributed numerous lectures and publications on DNA and its applications to population genetics, genealogy, ancestry, forensics, and history. With his family he currently resides in Rome, Italy.

See all the webinars by Ugo Perego in the Legacy library.
 
Not a member yet?

Legacy Family Tree Webinars provides genealogy education where-you-are through live and recorded online webinars and videos. Learn from the best instructors in genealogy including Thomas MacEntee, Judy Russell, J. Mark Lowe, Lisa Louise Cooke, Megan Smolenyak, Tom Jones, and many more. Learn at your convenience. On-demand classes are available 24 hours a day! All you need is a computer or mobile device with an Internet connection.

Subscribe today and get access to this BONUS members-only webinar AND all of this:

  • All 1,056 classes in the library (1,337 hours of quality genealogy education)
  • 4,570 pages of instructors' handouts
  • Chat logs from the live webinars
  • Additional 5% off anything at FamilyTreeWebinars.com
  • Chance for a bonus subscribers-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Additional members-only webinars

It's just $49.95/year.


Navigating Newspaper Research

Newspapers-post

You know newspaper research is important to your family history. It can uncover everything from vital record information to the casual mention of your ancestor's daily life. So go research newspapers! But, is it really that easy? Which website should you  use? If it’s a subscription website, which one should you invest in? It’s the one question I  always get when I give presentations about newspaper research. And my answer is always, “I don’t know.”

Here’s the reason I don’t know. It's not that I don't know what websites exist with digitized newspaper collections.  I don't know which one specifically will be beneficial to your research. Yes, I could recommend a website or two based on my own  research. However, the website’s usefulness depends on the location and time period you are researching. You will want to make sure that the subscription website you choose has the newspapers for the places and time periods that you are researching.

Options for historical newspaper collections are numerous. And they are not all online (but you knew that, right?).

When we are doing newspaper research your may find that a newspaper is:

  • In a physical form, bound and archived at a library
  • Available as images on a microfilm
  • Transcribed/abstracted/indexed  and available in a book 
  • Transcribed/abstracted/ indexed on a website (for example, GenDisasters)
  • Digitized on a subscription website (genealogy or newspaper website)
  • Digitized on a free website (local library, for example)
  • Not extant (destroyed or not archived)

Finding Aids

So where should you start? Start by seeking out finding aids.

Having so many options for historical newspaper content is great but the difficulty lies in finding the newspapers and the websites that you need for your research.

A few online finding aids to assist you are:

The website Chronicling America, in addition to offering digitized newspapers, also has a US Newspaper Directory, 1690 to the Present (rectangular pink button found at the top right of the website) that allows you to search by place or title to find historical newspapers. 

Newspaper Subscription Websites

Numerous subscription based digitized newspaper websites exist including:

As you explore what various digitized newspaper websites have to offer, it’s important to remember that they are consistently adding to their offerings, so you will need to check back periodically to see if they have the newspapers you need.

As you explore the websites mentioned above, see what newspapers and dates are covered by each website. For example, on the GenealogyBank website you can, at the top toolbar, click on Browse and then search newspapers by state, title or date. 

Don't forget that larger public academic libraries have subscriptions to digitized newspaper websites that are not available to individuals. I highly recommend you look on your local university library's website and see what subscription websites they offer. Most likely they have something that can be of use to you.

Genealogy  Websites

Some genealogy websites also have digitized newspapers or newspaper abstracts including:

Now, you’ll notice FamilySearch is not on the above list. FamilySearch doesn’t have newspapers per se but they still should be searched. Check the FamilySearch Catalog  first. You can search by the Place your ancestor lived in and then the category Newspapers.

FS catalog

Notice that a Catalog Keyword search for the term Newspapers brought up more than 15,000 results.

FS Catalog Newspapers

Most of these results are abstracts which can help you easily locate a mention of an ancestor which can then lead you to the actual newspaper. Finally, use the FamilySearch Research Wiki to locate information on Newspapers for your location of interest.

FS Wiki

Free Newspaper Websites

There are also numerous free digitized newspaper websites including:

So What Should You Do?

I don’t know what’s best for you and your research but what I do know is there are many online options and becoming acquainted with them can help you make the best decision. But you must also remember that not everything is or will ever be online. So after you explore the above options, consult the library catalog for the area you are researching to inquire about collections. If you don’t see what you’re looking for, call or email. My local library has  microfilmed copies of a local newspaper however, you would never find that in their online catalog. When I asked why, I was simply told they didn’t know. So always, reach out to librarians and archivists to learn more.

Learn more about newspaper research from these webinars in the Legacy library.

 

Gena Philibert-Ortega is an author, instructor, and researcher. She blogs at Gena's Genealogy and Food.Family.Ephemera. You can find her presentations on the Legacy Family Tree Webinars website.

 


Understanding Ethnicity Estimates - free webinar by Mary Eberle, JD, now online for limited time

2019-11-06-image500blog-ethnicity

The recording of today's webinar, "Understanding Ethnicity Estimates” by Mary Eberle, JD, is now available to view at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com for free for a limited time.

Webinar Description

Learn how and when ethnicity estimates can be useful. Several case studies where ethnicity estimates helped solve the genealogy mystery will be covered. This talk covers: 1. How ethnicity estimates are generated and the ancestral timeframe they reflect 2. Differences between the DNA testing companies 3. Additional tools to further explore ethnicity estimates 4. How to identify situations in which they can be very helpful 5. Several examples where ethnicity estimates helped solve a genealogy mystery will be covered.
 
View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 21 minute recording of "Understanding Ethnicity Estimates" is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. If you have a webinar membership, it is available anytime.

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 1,055 classes, 1,335 hours of genealogy education)
  • On-demand access to the instructor handouts (now 4,570 pages)
  • On-demand access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Chance for a members-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
  • Ability to view which webinars you are registered for
  • Use of the playlist, resume watching, and jump-to features

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year

Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

Soldier's Homes (1865-1930) Caring for our veterans 11/13/2019

Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA

Native American Research: Things You May Not Know 11/19/2019

Paula Stuart-Warren, CG, FMGS, FUGA

MyHeritage's SuperSearch (German) 11/20/2019

Silvia da Silva

A la Karte: Borders, Maps and Gazetteers for German Genealogists 11/20/2019

James M. Beidler

No Will? No Problem! 11/22/2019

Sharon Monson

MyHeritage: les fonctionnalités à utiliser absolument (French) 11/25/2019

Elisabeth Zetland

Genealogie voor beginners: hoe start ik mijn familiestamboom op MyHeritage? (Dutch) 11/25/2019

Willeke Binnendijk

MyHeritage DNA - en oversikt (Norwegian) 11/26/2019

Yael Beck

I Received DNA Matches, Now What? 11/26/2019

Daniel Horowitz

Buried Treasures: What's in the English Parish Chest 12/3/2019

Paul Milner

Marriages Here, There, and Nowhere: Finding Gretna Greens and Borders 12/17/2019

J. Mark Lowe, CG, FUGA

Print the 2019 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


Trove: An Australian and Beyond Genealogical Treasure - free webinar by Helen V. Smith now online for limited time

Trove: An Australian and Beyond Genealogical Treasure - free webinar by Helen V. Smith now online for limited time

The recording of the Down Under webinar, "Trove: An Australian and Beyond Genealogical Treasure” by Helen V. Smith, is now available to view at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com for free for a limited time.

Webinar Description

Australia (and the rest of the world) is very fortunate to have free access to Trove - a website of the National Library of Australia. Trove contains many digitised newspapers, some from all the Australian States and Territories up to 1954. While not every paper ever printed has been digitised there is a wide selection. The Trove site is not just newspapers but also has Picture Australia, theses, maps, and now the New South Wales and Commonwealth Government Gazettes. There are a number of ways to make your search more directed and ways to organise your research using the site.
 
View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 13 minute recording of "Trove: An Australian and Beyond Genealogical Treasure" is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. 

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 1,054 classes, 1,334 hours of genealogy education)
  • On-demand access to the instructor handouts (now 4,570 pages)
  • On-demand access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Chance for a members-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
  • Ability to view which webinars you are registered for
  • Use of the playlist, resume watching, and jump-to features

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year

Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

Understanding Ethnicity Estimates 11/6/2019

Mary Eberle, JD

Soldier's Homes (1865-1930) Caring for our veterans 11/13/2019

Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA

Native American Research: Things You May Not Know 11/19/2019

Paula Stuart-Warren, CG, FMGS, FUGA

MyHeritage's SuperSearch (German) 11/20/2019

Silvia da Silva

A la Karte: Borders, Maps and Gazetteers for German Genealogists 11/20/2019

James M. Beidler

No Will? No Problem! 11/22/2019

Sharon Monson

MyHeritage: les fonctionnalités à utiliser absolument (French) 11/25/2019

Elisabeth Zetland

Genealogie voor beginners: hoe start ik mijn familiestamboom op MyHeritage? (Dutch) 11/25/2019

Willeke Binnendijk

MyHeritage DNA - en oversikt (Norwegian) 11/26/2019

Yael Beck

I Received DNA Matches, Now What? 11/26/2019

Daniel Horowitz

Buried Treasures: What's in the English Parish Chest 12/3/2019

Paul Milner

Marriages Here, There, and Nowhere: Finding Gretna Greens and Borders 12/17/2019

J. Mark Lowe, CG, FUGA

Print the 2019 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


Register for Webinar Wednesday: Understanding Ethnicity Estimates by Mary Eberle, JD

Register
 
Learn how and when ethnicity estimates can be useful. Several case studies where ethnicity estimates helped solve the genealogy mystery will be covered. This talk covers: 1. How ethnicity estimates are generated and the ancestral timeframe they reflect 2. Differences between the DNA testing companies 3. Additional tools to further explore ethnicity estimates 4. How to identify situations in which they can be very helpful 5. Several examples where ethnicity estimates helped solve a genealogy mystery will be covered.
 
Join us and Mary Eberle, JD for the live webinar Wednesday, November 6, at 2pm eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion. 

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Can't make it to the live event?

No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

MaryEberle-144x144Mary Eberle is a DNA expert who founded DNA Hunters,® LLC in 2015. She is also an educator, an international speaker, and the author of “23 Best Tips for DNA Testing and Family History.”  Mary is a retired patent attorney with extensive DNA experience. Over 30 years ago, she began her scientific career. She developed DNA tests for transplant patients. Today, she leads the DNA Hunters team, which finds people’s biological parent and grandparents. 

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Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Wednesday, November 6, 2019 at:

  • 2pm Eastern (U.S.)
  • 1pm Central
  • 12pm Mountain
  • 11am Pacific

Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email both 1 day and 1 hour prior to the live webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone. 

 

We look forward to seeing you all there!