Tuesday's Tip - Known Associates (Intermediate)

  Known Associates

Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

Known Associates (Intermediate)

One of the best ways to break down a brick wall is by looking at your ancestor's FAN Club*  I use a combination of Unlinked Individuals/Trees, Hashtags, and Shared Events to record this information. 

 *FAN Club stands for Friends, Associates, and Neighbors which was coined by Elizabeth Shown Mills. You can read more about it HERE. This concept is also called "Cluster Genealogy." We also have several WEBINARS about this research strategy.

I use a three-method approach because each method brings something to the table.  

Unlinked Individuals/Trees

When working on a brick wall I add FANs as unlinked individuals. This gives me the opportunity to work with them just like I work with anyone else in my file. I research these associated people even though I don't know how they fit in yet because the more research I do, the more likely the connection will emerge. As I expand their family, sometimes it is easy to see the link. Even if I can't link their line to my main tree through a familial relationship, I will be able to link them to the main line using shared events (keep reading).

Hastags

I have hashtags like this..

FANs of Freeman, James (1752 - 1823)
FANs of McMichael, John (1727 - 1803)
FANs of  Simmons, James (1764-1843)

If I have more than one person with the same name, I can put further qualifiers in the Description field such as, "of Perry County, married Ellenor Lee"

I only do this for my "brick wall" ancestors and not for everyone.  I have a lot of other Hashtags related to my brick walls that help me find connections that I don't readily see. For example, men that served in the the same military unit, known DNA matches, lived in the same area at the same time, etc. This helps me see how the "FANs" are interrelated to each other.

Events

Whenever I am looking at a document that has multiple people named, I will share the event with those people. The only events that I don't share are census events. I copy and paste these (just my preference). Legacy will allow you to share events with people that aren't in your database but I always add them. (see point 1)

Bringing it all together

With Hashtags I am looking for people that are grouped together on more than one Hashtag. This is a clue that those people were closely associated. I can search by Hashtag and print out little mini reports that I can compare. I can also Tag a group of people, search by that Tag, and then print a report that include all of the Hashtags they have. There are several possibilities here.

With Events I like to run an Individual Chart Report on my brick walls from time to time. Sometimes just seeing it on paper will cause me to notice something that I didn't notice before like a couple of events that are shared with the same person.

Speaking of reports, another helpful report is the Chronology Comparison Report. Many times you are using this to see if two people in your database are really the same person but you can also compare two totally unrelated people to compare their timelines for dates and locations. This is especially helpful if you notice that two people were in two different places at the same time. Family and friends travel together.

I would love to hear your ideas about how you document an ancestor's FAN Club in Legacy.

  

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips check out the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis, CG® is part of the Legacy Family Tree team at MyHeritage. She handles the enhancement suggestions that come in from our users as well as writing for Legacy News. You can usually find her hanging out on the Legacy User Group Facebook page answering questions and posting tips.


Tuesday's Tip - Set Relationships (Intermediate)

Set Relationships

Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

Tuesday's Tip - Set Relationships (Intermediate)

The Set Relationships tool is one of those features in Legacy that is fun and helpful all at the same time. To set the relationships, navigate to the person you want to be as the anchor. This is usually you but you might be working on a project that requires the anchor to be someone else. You can change the anchor person on the Set Relationships screen but I just think it is easier to navigate to the correct person first. Now go to Tools > Set Relationships and this is what you will see.

Set Relationships
(Click image to enlarge)

 

There are a couple of things I want to explain on this screen. The Limit to the closest X relationships confuses some users. They think that Legacy can only have a maximum of 999 relationships but that isn't what this means. You can be related to someone in more than one way. This box tells you the maximum number of ways Legacy will calculate. I normally have this set to 20 so that Legacy doesn't have to think quite as hard. In my personal file the most ways I am related to a person is 8. For those of you with royal lineages you will see much higher numbers. I have seen files with people related to each other in 40 different ways. 

The other thing that can confuse users is the difference between Show the closest relationship vs. Show the closest direct-line relationship (if any). This too pertains to someone that you are related to in more than one way. Your 3rd great-granduncle may also be your 4th great-grandfather. The closest relationship is the 3rd great-granduncle but the closest direct-line relationship would be the 4th great-grandfather.

The Non-blood relationships option will give you your "in-law" type relationships. Most of these relationships will not appear on the Family View though the closest relationships will (father and mother-in-law, brother and sister-in-law, and son and daughter in-law). All others will appear on the Relationship Calculator

Here is what the relationship looks like on the Family View. The label will be above the person's name.

Relationship label
(Click image to enlarge)

 

And here is what you will see if you are related to someone in more than one way.

Multiple relationships
(Click image to enlarge)

 

There are actually TWO symbols here. The + (plus sign) means that there is more than one relationship. The * (asterisk) means that this person is in a younger generation than your anchor person. You will see this * on the Relationship Chart Report, The Relationship Report, and on the Relationship Calculator as well. 

If you hover your mouse over the relationship you will see a popup telling you who the anchor person is. This is VERY handy if you change anchor people (which I do). Notice that the anchor person is now my dad and not me.

Hover your mouse
(Click to enlarge image)

 

Now RIGHT click the + and this is what you will see.

Right click menu
(Click image to enlarge)

 

You can do some color customizations and you can see what this relationship would be in other languages. I will let you play with those feature. We are going to click View Additional Relationships which will bring up the Relationship Calculator. You can see that my dad is related to this person in 6 different ways (you would use the scroll bar to see the other ones). You can see my dad's lineage up to the Most Recent Common Ancestor as well as the other person's lineage. When you highlight another relationship this will change. From here you can print a Relationship Chart Report. You can print the highlighted relationship or all of the relationships. There are several options to customize the report. I will let you experiment with that.

Relationship Calculator
(Click to enlarge image)

 

There is another Relationship Report. You will see it by going to Reports > Other Reports > Relationship Report. You will not be able to access this report until you have set the relationships to someone. This report is great for DNA researchers. You can limit the report to blood relationships and/or to a group of tagged individuals. By default this report is in alphabetical order but you can export to a CSV file, open the file in any spreadsheet program, and then sort (or filter) by any column. Don't forget what those * mean!

Relationship Report
(Click to enlarge image)

 

I hope this has taken some of the mystery out of the Set Relationships and its related tools.

 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips check out the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis, CG® is part of the Legacy Family Tree team at MyHeritage. She handles the enhancement suggestions that come in from our users as well as writing for Legacy News. You can usually find her hanging out on the Legacy User Group Facebook page answering questions and posting tips.


Tuesday's Tip - Sorting the Name/Search and Marriage Lists (Beginner)

TT - Sorting the Name  Search and Marriage List

Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

Sorting the Name/Search and Marriage Lists (Beginner)

Did you know that you can sort the Name List, Search List and Marriage List

To sort the Name List or a Search List you can click the buttons at the top labeled #, Given, Surname and Legacy will sort your list by that criteria.

Name List

 

You can also go to Options > Show User ID# in the list and the RIN column with be replaced by the User ID. You can then sort by that.

Options Menu

 

On the Marriage List you can sort by MRIN, Husband (if using Gender Neutral this will be L Spouse), and Wife (if using Gender Neutral this will be R Spouse).

Marriage List

 

I like being able to sort my data in different ways. Not only does it help me find what I am looking for but I also notice things that I might not have readily seen otherwise.

 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips check out the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis, CG® is part of the Legacy Family Tree team at MyHeritage. She handles the enhancement suggestions that come in from our users as well as writing for Legacy News. You can usually find her hanging out on the Legacy User Group Facebook page answering questions and posting tips.


Tuesday's Tip - Using the Soundex (Intermediate)

TT - Using the Soundex

Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

Using the Soundex (Intermediate)

Old school researchers will know what the Soundex is but you don't hear much about it anymore. Newer researchers are probably not familiar with it. The funny thing is, you are using it and you don't even know it. Back to that in a bit.

First some information on what the Soundex is. The Soundex was a project of the Works Progress Administration (WPA). In the 1930s they came up with this indexing system for certain census records. It was a way to search for your ancestors even if the spelling of their name was off a bit. The censuses that have a Soundex Index are:

1880 - Only those families with children age 10 or younger
1890 - Very limited because of the fire that destroyed most of the 1890 census, Side note: HERE is an excellent history of the 1890 census from the National Archives
1900
1910 - Only for Alabama, Arkansas, California, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and West Virginia
1920
1930
- Only for Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky (only counties of Bell, Floyd, Harlan, Kenton, Muhlenberg, Perry and Pike), Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia (only counties of Fayette, Harrison, Kanawha, Logan, McDowell, Mercer, and Raleigh)

You can see the rules for creating the Soundex Codes HERE. Back in the day you did this by hand using these rules. Now you don't have to. There are Soundex Calculators that will do this for you and of course Legacy has one of these calculators. Go to Tools > Soundex. Type in the surname you want to calculate and then click Calculate Soundex Code.

Soundex Calculator

Simmons is my maiden name and I still have that code memorized! When you first access this tool it will automatically calculate the Soundex code for the person you had highlighted on your screen. If you click Search Name List it will give you everyone in your file that has the same Soundex code.

The WPA created index cards grouping everyone by their Soundex code. This was a way you could try and find your ancestor if the regular index wasn't turning up anything. We used to use big index books for the census but if you couldn't find your ancestor there you would turn to the Soundex. To see what a Soundex index card looks like click HERE. You can see that there was quite a bit of information extracted from the census on these cards! They were invaluable. You can still access the old Soundex microfilms through FamilySearch. HERE is a list of the available microfilms (along with some print Soundex indexes). Some, not all, of these are available to browse online (not part of the regular FamilySearch online collections). You can see an example HERE.

The good news is, you don't have to do this anymore. Online indexes have Soundex options built in and that is what I meant when I said you were using the Soundex and you didn't even know it. Sometimes it is obvious but sometimes it isn't. For example, here is a screenshot from MyHeritage's Search page and you will see that the Soundex is an option. Notice that MyHeritage uses the "refined" Soundex. If a certain surname has an secondary "refined" value, Legacy will show you both when you use the built in calculator.

MyHeritage Search
 

Other search sites such as FamilySearch have the algorithm built into to their "fuzzy" search so you won't see a separate option for it. 

So if everything is automated, why do you need to know what the Soundex codes are and why do you need a Soundex code calculator? One thing that the Legacy calculator will do for you is generate a Search List of everyone with the same Soundex code which might help you find a duplicate that you didn't know you had. My One Name Study is for the surname Glaentzer. When I run the calculator using this surname I see all of the variations that I am accustomed to seeing in the records which solidifies the theory that these variations are in fact valid.

If you are doing a search on a website that doesn't specifically have a Soundex option you can check a potential match to see if they do have the same Soundex code which is additional evidence that you might be dealing with the same person.

Is the Soundex perfect? Of course not but it is another weapon in your genealogy arsenal. 

Easter Egg alert!  There is a bit of an Easter Egg on the Soundex Calculator screen. Did you notice the little globe icon? If you click that you will be taken to FamilySearch's Place Locator. This is a VERY useful tool. I am not sure how it ended up on this screen. I have asked the developers to consider moving this to a more conspicuous location. Until then, since you guys read my articles you will know where to find this.

 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips check out the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis, CG® is part of the Legacy Family Tree team at MyHeritage. She handles the enhancement suggestions that come in from our users as well as writing for Legacy News. You can usually find her hanging out on the Legacy User Group Facebook page answering questions and posting tips.


Tuesday's Tip - How to Delete a File (Beginner)

 
Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

How to Delete a File (Beginner)

If you ever need to delete a file, there is a right way and a wrong way to do it. The correct way is to open the file and go to File > Delete File. If you do it this way Legacy will also delete the associated helper files. There are quite a few which will be unnecessary clutter if you don't delete them. You will get a confirmation dialog box to give you the opportunity to change your mind.

File > Delete File
 
Sometimes we create temporary files for a specific purpose. For example, if you want to create a report or a chart that only includes certain people you can export those people to a temporary file, create your report/chart there, and then delete this file. You might want to send just a portion of your file to a relative who also uses Legacy. When you create temporary files make sure you name them in such a way so that there is no chance you will accidentally delete the wrong file.
 
If you are not 100% sure of what you are doing, always backup the file before you delete it. If you ever change your mind you will still have the file.
 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips check out the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis, CG® is part of the Legacy Family Tree team at MyHeritage. She handles the enhancement suggestions that come in from our users as well as writing for Legacy News. You can usually find her hanging out on the Legacy User Group Facebook page answering questions and posting tips.


Tuesday's Tip - FamilySearch Filters (Intermediate)

FamilySearch Filters

Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

FamilySearch Filters (Intermediate)

On the FamilySearch interface screen there are two ways to filter the list of ancestors/relatives that you see. The first filter governs what you see related to FamilySearch itself. This is the drop down box you see at the top left. My favorite filter here is the Possible Duplicates.  Notice that whenever you use a filter the number of people will be updated as well as your percentage of completion. 

FamilySearch filter

The second filter governs filtering the people in your file. Click the Edit button. You have five different filters at the top and then at the bottom you can either suppress living people or include them but indicate that they are living. If you choose that option they will have a little red heart next to their name. I love this filtering because I like to work on specific groups of people. You can use this filtering in conjunction with the drop down list filtering. 

Ss6

Using the two different filtering options will help you stay focused and not overwhelmed with the number of people in your file when using FamilySearch's FamilyTree.

 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips check out the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis, CG® is part of the Legacy Family Tree team at MyHeritage. She handles the enhancement suggestions that come in from our users as well as writing for Legacy News. You can usually find her hanging out on the Legacy User Group Facebook page answering questions and posting tips.


Tuesday's Tip - FamilySearch Import Tree (Intermediate)

FamilySearch Import Tree

Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

FamilySearch Import Tree (Intermediate)

You can import directly from FamilySearch by opening the FamilySearch interface and selecting Import Tree. Before we get into the specific importing options here are a few general tips:

  • Don't try and import 200 generations at one time. This make cleanup very difficult. Only import a small section. Once that is cleaned up you can import another section
  • And you WILL be doing cleanup. When you do a direct download you get all of the errors that people have entered. You will have factual errors and data formatting errors (standardization)
  • Always download into a new, empty Legacy file. Do all of your cleanup there and then import this new file into your main file. Before and after the import make sure you check/repair all files involved. You will also need to deal with any duplicates you have introduced once you combine the files. Make sure you name these files in such a way you won't get them confused with your main file

Import Tree

You can start the import with yourself or with any FSID you choose. If you choose someone other than yourself, click the Verify button to make sure that you do indeed have the correct person. The last option, Current person selected..., is greyed out because I am importing into a blank file. If you were to import into an existing file this option would be available to you.

If you select 0 Ancestors and 0 Descendants you will only import that one person. You can select up to 200 generations of Ancestors and 100 generations of descendants but I wouldn't max this out unless you have a lot of time for cleanup. 

ALWAYS check the box to Assign source citations to imported data. The info is no good to you unless you know where it came from.

Include spouses of children is optional. I usually check this because it helps me differentiate between persons of the same name based on who they married.

I would leave the Check for duplicates UNchecked unless you are doing a small import. You can always tell Legacy to check for duplicates later (Update Matches > Recheck linked individuals for duplicates). 

I always check the box to Include only preferred parents. There are some people on FamilySearch that have 20 sets of parents. Most of these are duplicates. I don't need that kind of aggravation. After the import you might still see a few people with two sets of parents. These are parents that you are related to in more than one way and Legacy isn't able to decide which set you would prefer to keep. This is almost always a case of a child being linked to their real parents and also linked to a set of wrong parents. I flag these for later research (Search > Find > Misc. > Individuals with multiple parents).

Once you click the OK button you can go throw a load of laundry in the dryer or empty the dishwasher. Depending on how many generations you chose and whether or not you are including spouses, checking for duplicates, and all parents (not preferred) it can take a while for Legacy to complete the import. You can watch the progress on the screen if you wish. You can also use your computer while it is downloading but I like to shut everything connected to the internet down so that all of the bandwidth can be dedicated for the download (for example, cloud syncing, auto email checking, etc). 

Once you your download has completed, do a check/repair on this file and back it up. Now the clean up fun begins!

 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips check out the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis, CG® is part of the Legacy Family Tree team at MyHeritage. She handles the enhancement suggestions that come in from our users as well as writing for Legacy News. You can usually find her hanging out on the Legacy User Group Facebook page answering questions and posting tips.


FamilySearch - New "Lock" Feature

FamilySearch - New "Lock" Feature

We have added something new to the Legacy FamilySearch screen. You will now see Lock icons on anyone that has been marked private/invisible and on any event that has been marked private. If you see the lock you will not be able to transfer that person or event until you change their status.

Notice in the screenshot that Asa has been marked as private. All of the transfer arrows have been removed from the left side of the screen. You can't transfer any information to FamilySearch. You can still transfer information from FamilySearch to Legacy. The transfer arrows are still intact on the right side of the screen.

Private individuals

I changed Asa to private AFTER he had been linked to FamilySearch. If he had been marked private before I tried to add him, I would not have been able to add him to FamilySearch. Notice that Nathan Brown has a lock icon in the filtered list to the left. Notice he does not have arrows next to his name which means he wasn't previously linked. I will not be able to transfer him to FamilySearch at all.

In this next screenshot you will see that I have a single event marked as private. I will not be able to transfer this event to FamilySearch.

Private event

If you have marked a VITAL event as private using privacy brackets, you will be able to see those privacy brackets on the screen to alert you that the information is indeed private (this is not a new change).

Private vital events

We made these changes so that you don't accidentally transfer anyone who has been marked as private/invisible nor any events marked as private.  If you want to transfer any of this information you will need to change the privacy setting in Legacy first.

 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips check out the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis, CG® is part of the Legacy Family Tree team at MyHeritage. She handles the enhancement suggestions that come in from our users as well as writing for Legacy News. You can usually find her hanging out on the Legacy User Group Facebook page answering questions and posting tips.

 


Tuesday's Tip - Mailing Lists (Beginner)

Mailing Lists

Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

Mailing Lists (Beginner)

Legacy has a really nifty built in feature where you can build Mailing Lists of your relatives. You will see these lists on the Mailing Address screen for each person. You can add each person to one or more lists.

Mailing Lists

 

You can get to this screen in two ways, from the Family View and from the Individual's Information screen.

Family View


Individual's Information screen

 

You will use this in conjunction with the Address Labels. On the main toolbar go to Reports > Other Reports > Address Labels. On the Who to Print tab you must have Mailing Addresses selected or you won't see the Mailing Lists.

Address Labels

 

Now you can print address labels for a mass mailing like a quarterly family newsletter or holiday cards.  For more information, please see:

Working with Addresses Part I
Working with Addresses Part II
Working with Addresses Part III
Legacy 101 - Reports

 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips check out the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis, CG® is part of the Legacy Family Tree team at MyHeritage. She handles the enhancement suggestions that come in from our users as well as writing for Legacy News. You can usually find her hanging out on the Legacy User Group Facebook page answering questions and posting tips.


Tuesday's Tip - Birthdays, Death Dates, and Anniversaries (Beginner)

TT- Birthdays

Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

Birthdays, Death Dates, and Anniversaries (Beginner)

You can tell Legacy to remind you of birthdays, death dates, and anniversaries. These reminders will display on the Legacy Home tab.

To set a birthday and/or death date reminder, open the person's Individual's Information screen and you will see the check boxes at the bottom right. If you haven't entered any dates these boxes will be greyed out. It has to be a full date with a day and month.

Birthday and death reminders

 

You can also access this on the Name List by clicking the Detail tab over on the right

Name List

 

To set an Anniversary reminder you will check the box on the Marriage screen. 

Anniversary Reminder

 

You can also set this on the Marriage List.

Marriage List

 

Now you will see these displayed on the Legacy Home tab.

Legacy Home tab

 

You can tell Legacy how far in advanced you want to be reminded. On the Legacy Home tab click Options in the upper right corner and then click Options again. Make sure you are on the Reminder Options tab.

Reminder Options

 

This option is very important to me. I am a bit of a scatterbrain so I rarely even know what day of the week it is. Now I am able to send out birthday and anniversary cards to my family (on time!) and I can send a loved one a note in remembrance of a death. You have complete control over who will show up on your Reminders list.

 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips check out the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis, CG® is part of the Legacy Family Tree team at MyHeritage. She handles the enhancement suggestions that come in from our users as well as writing for Legacy News. You can usually find her hanging out on the Legacy User Group Facebook page answering questions and posting tips.