Register for Webinar Wednesday: The 10 Most Useful Databases for Eastern European Research by Lisa Alzo

Register
 
With more information available online, it is often possible to find key records for your Eastern European ancestors in free and subscription databases. Learn about the various record sets available, how to access them, and how to overcome privacy and language issues and other research roadblocks.
 
Join us and Lisa Alzo for the live webinar Wednesday, May 15, 2019 . Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion. 

Registerbut 

Or register for multiple webinars at once by clicking here.

Not sure if you already registered?

Login to view your registration status for this webinar (available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers).

Test Your Webinar Connection

To ensure that your webinar connection is ready to go, click here.

Can't make it to the live event?

No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

Lisa-alzo-144x144Lisa A. Alzo M.F.A. is a freelance writer, instructor, and internationally recognized lecturer, specializing in Slovak/Eastern European genealogical research, writing your family history, and using the Internet to trace female and immigrant ancestors. She is the author of ten books, including the award-winning Three Slovak Women, and hundreds of magazine articles, and writes the blog "The Accidental Genealogist."

 

Add it to your Google Calendar

With our Google Calendar button, you will never forget our upcoming webinars. Simply click the button to add it to your calendar. You can then optionally embed the webinar events (and even turn them on and off) into your own personal calendar. If you have already added the calendar, you do not have to do it again - the new webinar events will automatically appear.

Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Wednesday, May 15, 2019 at:

  • 2pm Eastern (U.S.)
  • 1pm Central
  • 12pm Mountain
  • 11am Pacific

Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email both 1 day and 1 hour prior to the live webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone. 

We look forward to seeing you all there!


Tuesday's Tip - The Source Clipboard Part I (Intermediate)

TT - The Source Clipboard Part I

Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

The Source Clipboard Part I (Intermediate)

I had someone ask to see more about the Source Clipboard so here it is. The Source Clipboard is there to save you some time. I will give you an example from my file. I very often get death certificates or marriage certificates in batches. I can load a master source onto the clipboard and then just change the detail when I change certificates. Here is the process step by step.

Source Clipboard icon
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Step 1
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Select a source
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Enter the detail
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Save the detail
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Assigned Sources screen
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Paste icon
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The Source Clipboard has already saved you some time but here is where it will save you even more. Now I am going to add another Louisiana Death Certificate. I don’t need to change the Master Source, only the Detail. I go to my new person and click the Source Clipboard icon.

Source Clipboard icon
(click image to enlarge)
Change the detail
(click image to enlarge)
New detail
(click image to enlarge)

 

I can now paste this citation in all the places it needs to go. When I am done I will go to the next person.

In Part II, I will show you how to save source citations to use again later and also how paste more than one source at a time.

 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips check out the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis, CG® is part of the Legacy Family Tree team at MyHeritage. She handles the enhancement suggestions that come in from our users as well as writing for Legacy News. You can usually find her hanging out on the Legacy User Group Facebook page answering questions and posting tips.

 

 


MyHeritage Genealogy Seminar this Wednesday - live in Israel or online at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

MyHeritage Genealogy Seminar Webinars Now Available online for Free

MyHeritage is hosting a live genealogy seminar at its headquarters in Or Yehuda, Israel this Wednesday. If you're not in the area, but still want to attend classes taught by renowned genealogical educators Thomas MacEntee, Daniel Horowitz and Garri Regev, you can attend the live broadcasts (free) via FamilyTreeWebinars.com. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com/mhseminar2019.

The presentations include:

  • Genealogy Pit Stop: Research in 15 Minute Increments by Thomas MacEntee
  • MyHeritage: New Advanced Features and Technologies by Daniel Horowitz
  • City Directories: No Town Too Small, No Clue Too Little by Thomas MacEntee
  • APPsolutely Genealogy! by Garri Regev

We'll see you in Or Yehuda or online at FamilyTreeWebinars.com!


Advanced Features on Geni.com - register for Tuesday's free MyHeritage webinar by Mike Stangel

Register-mh
 
Take a deep dive into the Geni website and learn how you can manage individual profiles, upload images, take notes, and much more to further your genealogical research.
 
Join us and Mike Stangel for the live webinar Tuesday, May 14, 2019 . Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion. 

Registerbut 

Or register for multiple webinars at once by clicking here.

Not sure if you already registered?

Login to view your registration status for this webinar (available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers).

Test Your Webinar Connection

To ensure that your webinar connection is ready to go, click here.

Can't make it to the live event?

No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

MikeStangel-144x144Mike Stangel is the General Manager of Geni (a MyHeritage company based in Burbank, California), where he started as a developer in 2006. Mike is responsible for managing the Geni team, overseeing the product roadmap and still enjoys writing code. He holds a M.S. in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and has previously worked on optimized networking protocols for mobile-enabled applications. Mike currently lives in the San Fernando Valley north of Los Angeles with his wife, three children and a house full of animals.

 

Add it to your Google Calendar

With our Google Calendar button, you will never forget our upcoming webinars. Simply click the button to add it to your calendar. You can then optionally embed the webinar events (and even turn them on and off) into your own personal calendar. If you have already added the calendar, you do not have to do it again - the new webinar events will automatically appear.

Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Tuesday, May 14, 2019 at:

  • 2pm Eastern (U.S.)
  • 1pm Central
  • 12pm Mountain
  • 11am Pacific

Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email both 1 day and 1 hour prior to the live webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone. 

We look forward to seeing you all there!


Maximize Your Immigration Research with MyHeritage

Passenger lists provide genealogists with key information about an ancestor's arrival in the New World. Once located, these records can help us discover an immigrant’s original name and potentially assist with determining an immigrant's place of origin.

The MyHeritage Immigration & Travel Collection includes passenger arrival records, naturalization records, border crossings, emigration records, passports, and convict transportation records. You will need a subscription or free 14-day trial to view your search results.

I started working on my genealogy in 1989 to learn more about my maternal grandmother, Verona Straka, and eventually published her story in my book Three Slovak Women. My early research involved family documents and interviews with my mother. My mother shared a story about how my grandmother was detained at Ellis Island for health reasons and almost did not make it into the United States.

At that time, I had no documentation to prove this story. In the old days of genealogy research (before online databases), obtaining a ship's manifest required a several step process of submitting forms to the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration. I did eventually track down the passenger list showing my grandmother's arrival in New York on 8 August 1922. There was a notation "hospital discharged" above her name, which meant she had spent time in the Ellis Island hospital upon arrival, and confirmed what my mother told me.

One of the benefits of indexed online immigration records is the possibility of more than one type of record turning up in the search results. So even if you have located the manifest for your ancestor through correspondence (as I did), via microfilm, or by using free sites such as The Statue of Liberty Foundation Ellis Island Database, FamilySearch, or subscription websites, it is worth searching for your ancestor’s name in all available immigration record collections.

The New York Passenger Lists on MyHeritage.com

I typed my grandmother's name into the "Ellis Island and Other New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957" database collection on MyHeritage.com, and found her arrival record listed on the first page of results. This database contains over 113+ million records. My grandmother arrived in 1922 and the manifest spanned two pages consisting of 33 columns. MyHeritage has also indexed the answers to two vital supplemental questions: The name and address of the relative or friend whom they were joining in the USA (added to the form in 1897) and the name and address of their closest relative or friend in their home country (added in 1907), yielding an additional 26.6 million names to this database (see the post "New: Ellis Island and other New York Passenger Lists" from November 2017 on the MyHeritage Blog for details). So be sure to look for your ancestor’s name in these columns too. With a different search, I found my paternal grandfather listed as the "Relative joined in the U.S." on the 1920 passenger manifest for his sister. This is a great way to perform cluster and collateral searches.

MH-Indexed-passenger-record

Another benefit of searching for New York passenger lists on MyHeritage is being able to view a two-page manifest such as the one listing my grandmother as one whole image and not have to move forward or backward to see each individual page as with other databases (MyHeritage took the 2.2 million paired images and married the pages together resulting in 1.1 million stitched images). To learn more about this particular indexing project, watch the free Legacy Family Tree webinar “Find Your Immigrant Ancestors AND Their Relatives in the NY Passenger Arrival Records” by Mike Mansfield.

Manifest-myheritage-007658683_00558-s

One More Result: My Favorite Ancestor Find

In addition to the main arrival record I located for my grandmother, one of the results returned was for a Record of Detained Alien Passengers for the Orduna, arriving in New York on 8 August 1922. This record is my favorite ancestor find because it not only confirmed a family story, but also gave me additional insights into the immigration experience of my maternal grandmother.

In her article "A Guide to Interpreting Passenger List Annotations" Marian L. Smith, Historian, U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service, explains the purpose of the Record of Detained Aliens form:  "Passenger list annotations from the early 1890's indicate that some immigrants were held or detained for further questioning, but there are no additional records on the microfilm about the detained immigrants. Beginning in 1903, at New York (Ellis Island), new forms came to be filed with each manifest and bound in the manifest volumes. One of these is the list or Record of Detained Aliens. Information on the record helps to clarify why a given immigrant was detained, how long they remained in detention, and how the case was resolved."  An electronic version of this article is found on the JewishGen website.

When I viewed The Record of Detained Alien Passengers for the Orduna, my grandmother's name was listed along with her cause of detention (Hosp. on arrival), the date and time of her discharge, and her next of kin, "Mother, Maria, 129 Crawford St. Duquesne, PA.” The “next of kin” information is actually incorrect as Maria was my grandmother’s sister, the mother of her niece, also named “Maria Straka” who traveled with my grandmother and also appears on the main passenger list. Passenger lists were prepared at the port of departure. The wrongly noted “next of kin” information” offers a good example of why we should always carefully evaluate any record we obtain about an ancestor.

Recordofdetainedalienstraka

Searching Other Ports

If your searches in the New York database collection are unsuccessful, you may be looking in records for the wrong port. While millions of immigrants arrived in the United States at the port of New York between 1820 and 1957, it is quite possible your ancestor landed elsewhere. The Immigration collection on MyHeritage also includes searchable indexes and/or records for the ports of Philadelphia, Boston, Baltimore, and Atlantic and Gulf Ports, as well as other collections such as Port of New York, Index to Discharged or Deserted Crew, 1917-1957, and United States Passport Applications, 1795-1925. For tips on immigration research, watch the free Legacy webinar "Following Your Family's Immigration Trail on MyHeritage."

Of course, your mileage and search success with immigration records may vary. But, as with any genealogy site, you should keep checking MyHeritage for new and updated database collections. You never know where you will find that new clue about an immigrant ancestor.

 

For over two decades, author and instructor Lisa A. Alzo has been educating and inspiring genealogists around the world to research and write about their ancestors. She has presented 44 webinars for Legacy Family Tree Webinars, include nine on Writing and Publishing. Lisa coaches aspiring family history writers through her online courses at Research, Write, Connect https://www.researchwriteconnect.com 

 


New "Member Friday" Webinar - Formatting Your Family History Book for Print by Lisa Alzo

New "Member Friday" Webinar - Formatting Your Family History Book for Print by Lisa Alzo

Every Friday we're pleased to offer Legacy Family Tree Webinar subscribers a new bonus webinar just for them!   This Friday enjoy "Formatting Your Family History Book for Print" by Lisa Alzo. If you're not a member, remember the webinar previews are always free.

Formatting Your Family History Book for Print

Learn the step-by-step process to correctly format a family history book for print distribution and the tips and tools to ensure successful self-publishing.

Formatting Your Family History Book for Print by Lisa Alzo


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_WatchPreview 

About the Presenter

Lisa AlzoLisa A. Alzo M.F.A. is a freelance writer, instructor, and internationally recognized lecturer, specializing in Slovak/Eastern European genealogical research, writing your family history, and using the Internet to trace female and immigrant ancestors. She is the author of ten books, including the award-winning Three Slovak Women, and hundreds of magazine articles, and writes the blog "The Accidental Genealogist."

See all the webinars by Lisa Alzo in the Legacy library.

 
Not a member yet?

Legacy Family Tree Webinars provides genealogy education where-you-are through live and recorded online webinars and videos. Learn from the best instructors in genealogy including Thomas MacEntee, Judy Russell, J. Mark Lowe, Lisa Louise Cooke, Megan Smolenyak, Tom Jones, and many more. Learn at your convenience. On-demand classes are available 24 hours a day! All you need is a computer or mobile device with an Internet connection.

Subscribe today and get access to this BONUS members-only webinar AND all of this:

  • All 907 classes in the library (1183 hours of quality genealogy education)
  • 4,013 pages of instructors' handouts
  • Chat logs from the live webinars
  • Additional 5% off anything at FamilyTreeWebinars.com
  • Chance for a bonus subscribers-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Additional members-only webinars

It's just $49.95/year.

Subscribe

Look at our lineup of speakers for 2019! All live webinars are free to watch.

Print the 2019 webinar brochure here.


Tuesday's Tip - Color Coding Living People (Beginner)

Color Coding Living People

Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

Color Coding Living People (Beginner)

If you do DNA research it is common to kill people off so that they will show up in gedcom uploads. For example, I kill myself off as well as my paternal uncle and mother. I manage their DNA so I have gedcoms uploaded showing their information (with their permission of course). I do this with all DNA testers that I assist or manage (again, with their permission).

HOWEVER, sometimes I forget that I have killed someone off.

Here is my uncle and my aunt. Notice that the word Husband is in black and Wife is in red. Red = Living. Oops. My poor uncle! I can assure you he is alive and well. Also notice that his relationship label says "Self." I have the relationships set to him instead of me and that is a clue that I am currently working with his DNA.

Living Indicator
(click image to enlarge)

 

To turn this option on, go to Options > Customize > Data Format > Option 3.9 and make sure that Highlight Living Individuals is selected. Of course you don't have to be doing DNA research to turn this on. It is a quick way to tell who is alive in your file which can be very important if someone that should be dead isn't. You can see read about this in IntelliMurder!

So what if you don't like red and would prefer purple? Click the Select Color button to the right.

Select Color
(click image to enlarge)

 

Now you can select a color from the boxes at the top left, or a color from one of the Color Palettes on the right, or you can click the Set Custom Color button to pick your own color. I chose #7 from the ArtDeco Color Palette, a nice dusty purple. You can see the old color and the new one. Once the color loads, click Select this Color.

Select a Color
(click image to enlarge)

 

And here is what it looks like on the screen. Hmmmmm, I might need to go a shade darker.

On Family View
(click image to enlarge)

 

My uncle will be happy to know that I just resurrected him from the dead.

 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips check out the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis, CG® is part of the Legacy Family Tree team at MyHeritage. She handles the enhancement suggestions that come in from our users as well as writing for Legacy News. You can usually find her hanging out on the Legacy User Group Facebook page answering questions and posting tips.


New! The essential guide to finding your Scottish ancestors

New 12-part Scotland Series

Legacy Family Tree Webinars is pleased to announce a new 12-part Scottish genealogy series by one of Scotland's most prominent genealogists, Dr. Bruce Durie. The course takes you through the critical aspects of Scottish genealogy. For those with Scottish ancestry, this in-depth course is essential. 

The series debuted with a free live webinar on Friday, May 3rd and was immediately followed by the release of five pre-recorded classes into the Legacy library. These will be followed by another free live webinar on Friday, June 7th, 2019 and the release of the remaining 5 classes that same day.

The Scottish Course includes:

1. Scottish genealogy – Everything you need is at ScotlandsPeople, ScotlandsPlaces and the NationalLibrary of Scotland (Free until 5/8/2019, introductory)

2. Who Are The Scots? – History, Anthropology, DNA

3. Using ScotlandsPeople for Scottish censuses – 1841 and before to 1911

4. Using ScotlandsPeople for pre-1855 Old Parish Record – Baptisms, Marriages, Burials

5. Using ScotlandsPeople for post-1855 Statutory Records – Births, Marriages, Deaths

6. Scotland has no Probate – Wills and Testaments, Land Inheritance back to 1544

7. Using ScotlandsPlaces for People in Land and Tax Records etc., Maps, Gazetteers - Register for FREE June 7th live webinar

8. Numbers, Dates, Calendars, Money and Measure in Scotland

9. Scots Heraldry and Coats of Arms

10. Other Scottish Records and Sources – NRS, NRAS, SCAN

11. Myths, Stories and Pitfalls in Scottish Genealogy

12. Emigration from Scotland

 

About the Presenter

BruceDurie-400x400Dr. Bruce Durie is considered one of Scotland's top genealogists, with an international reputation. He is perhaps best known for his eight-year BBC radio series, “Digging Up Your Roots” and “A House with A Past”, and he has authored over 30 books, including the best-selling “Scottish Genealogy” now in its 4th edition. His background is in medicine and neuropharmacology, as well as holding a doctoral degree in history and education.
 
Bruce founded, delivered and ran the much-acclaimed Postgraduate Program in Genealogical Studies at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow, including a full-time, online, one-year Masters Genealogical Studies programme. He now teaches courses on Genealogy, Documents and Heraldry as a Teaching Fellow at the University of Edinburgh.
 
He is well known for speaking, lecturing and presenting workshops on various aspects of Scottish genealogy, heraldry, history and culture worldwide but particularly in the UK, USA and Canada.
 
His latest book is "Your Scottish-American Ancestry" and forthcoming are:
  • "Celt-ish: Uncovering the Great 'Celtic' Conspiracy" (The History Press, late 2019/early 2020)
  • “The American Declaration of Independence and the Declaration of Arbroath” (early 2020)

(see www.brucedurie.co.uk/books.html)

Other honours and awards:

  • Shennachie (Genealogist and Historian) to the Chief of Durie
  • Elected to the prestigious Académie Internationale de Généalogie (the only member from Scotland)
  • Recently appointed Chartered Biologist (CBiol) by the Royal Biological Society for his work on the public understanding of Genetic Genealogy
  • Founding Member of the Register of Qualified Genealogists (www.qualifiedgenealogists.org)
  • Founding Member of the Editorial Board of two scholarly, peer-reviewed journals, Genealogy (www.mdpi.com/journal/genealogy) and The Journal of Genealogy and Family History (www.qualifiedgenealogists.org/ojs)
  • Fulbright Senior Scottish Studies Scholar 2016, spending eight months researching “Scottish Migration into Colonial America” at St Andrews University, Laurinburg, North Carolina, USA
  • Right of Audience at the Court of the Lord Lyon

More info at: www.brucedurie.co.uk

 
Not a member yet?

Legacy Family Tree Webinars provides genealogy education where-you-are through live and recorded online webinars and videos. Learn from the best instructors in genealogy including Thomas MacEntee, Judy Russell, J. Mark Lowe, Lisa Louise Cooke, Megan Smolenyak, Tom Jones, and many more. Learn at your convenience. On-demand classes are available 24 hours a day! All you need is a computer or mobile device with an Internet connection.

Subscribe today and get access to this BONUS members-only webinar AND all of this:

  • All 905 classes in the library (1,179 hours of quality genealogy education)
  • 3,971 pages of instructors' handouts
  • Chat logs from the live webinars
  • Additional 5% off anything at FamilyTreeWebinars.com
  • Chance for a bonus subscribers-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Additional members-only webinars

It's just $49.95/year.

Subscribe

Look at our lineup of speakers for 2019! All live webinars are free to watch.

Print the 2019 webinar brochure here.


A Look at a Few Online World War II Databases

A Look at a Few Online World War II Databases

Want to research your World War II ancestor? Aside from ordering military files from a government archive or searching genealogy websites for records, there are countless online images, databases, and digitized collections that can help you.  When searching for  resources, make sure to utilize archives, museum, and library websites for the country you are researching. The following websites provide just a sample of what is available online.

World War II United States Military Records

The FamilySearch Research Wiki page, World War II United States Military Records, 1941 to 1945  is one of the first places US researchers should peruse.  The Wiki contains links for FamilySearch collections as well as collections found on other genealogy websites. Don’t forget to explore the links on the left-hand side of the wiki page for different record sets including Pension Records, Prisoners of War, Service Records, Soldiers Homes, and Unit Histories If you don’t see your favorite collection, consider contributing that information. Afterall, it’s a wiki and wikis and their users benefit when information is shared.

JDC Archives

For those with Jewish ancestors, the JDC Archives has various digitized images with over 500,000 names in their collection that can be beneficial to family historians. “The JDC Names Index  is an indispensable resource tool for genealogists, personal historians, and scholarly researchers alike. Here you can search for relatives, friends, ancestors; anyone worldwide who has received JDC aid, financial or otherwise.” Beginning in the early 1900s and continuing on through the World War II years you can find names from immigration, refugee, ship, and orphan lists.            

An example of the information found in these lists is Refugees in Polish Border Areas, 1938-1939 which is described as "Lists of Polish Jews expelled from Germany by the Nazi government into the Polish border town of Zbaszyn and others expelled from the German client state of Slovakia to towns in the no-man’s-land across the border in Western Galicia, receiving assistance from the JDC in 1938-1939." The list includes name, birth date, occupation, former residence, marital status and name and address of relatives in the United States.

JDC List
"List of Persons Posessing Relatives in the U.S.A."

UK National Archives Research Guide

The UK National Archives Research Guide, Second World War  will help you better understand what records are available to research your World War II era English ancestors but it also includes links to online collections such as Allied Expeditionary Force papers (1943-1945) and Cabinet Papers (1915-1978). Related National Archives Research Guides you can access from this page include: British Army operations in the Second World War; Royal Air Force operations; Royal Navy operations in the Second World War; and War crimes 1939-1945.

Library and Archives Canada

Library and Archives Canada's Service Files of the Second World War - War Dead, 1939-1947 includes 44,097 references to individuals who were killed in action, died as a result of an accident or illness while in service, and those who subsequently died of injuries from their service. However, this database does not include information about those who survived the war nor "the locations of overseas postings or list battles in which an individual may have participated." The page also includes suggestions for searching the database.

LAC

World War II Nominal Roll 

For those with Australian roots, the the World War II Nominal Roll website honors the "men and women who served in Australia’s defense forces and the Merchant Navy during this conflict." Searchable by "name, service number, honours, or place," this website includes services records of one million individuals who served. The information provided can also include next of kin and date/place of birth.

WW2 nominal roll

Lastly, don’t forget to review Legacy Family Tree World War II webinars and their handouts for other websites and collections. Good luck with your research!

 

Gena Philibert-Ortega is an author, instructor, and researcher. She blogs at Gena's Genealogy and Food.Family.Ephemera. You can find her presentations on the Legacy Family Tree Webinars website.


All Finnish and Danish record in MyHeritage FREE for one week

If you have Danish or Finnish ancestry (like I do!), and you don't yet have a subscription to MyHeritage, here's your chance to gain access to these Nordic records for free for a week. Here's the details.

We recently added the 1940 Denmark Census to our historical records database, making MyHeritage the world’s most comprehensive online resource for Danish historical records.

To mark this milestone, we are opening up access to ALL 105 million Danish records on MyHeritage for FREE, starting today and until May 12, 2019 (inclusive).

As a bonus to delight our users with Nordic roots, we are also providing FREE access to ALL 48.6 million Finnish records on MyHeritage.

Free Finnish and Danish Records

Search the Danish collections here.

Search the Finnish collections here.

You can read more details at the MyHeritage blog.