Maintaining an Organized Computer - free webinar by Cyndi Ingle now online for limited time

Maintaining an Organized Computer - free webinar by Cyndi Ingle now online for limited time

The recording of Wednesday's webinar, "Maintaining an Organized Computer” by Cyndi Ingle is now available to view at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com for free for a limited time.

Webinar Description

Files here, programs there, lost bits and bytes everywhere. Are you tired of searching your computer fruitlessly? Frustrated when you can't find the notes you created in your word processor? Learn how to set up a foolproof filing system and an electronic workbook to correspond with your offline research.
 
View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 32 minute recording of "Maintaining an Organized Computer" is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership

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Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

Visualizing Information for Genealogists 1/15/2019

Margaret R. Fortier, CG

What Would You Do If You Had Five Days in Washington DC? 1/16/2019

Pamela Boyer Sayre, CG, CGL

Using OneNote with your Genealogy 1/23/2019

Tessa Keough

Patriot or Not?: Using the Genealogical Proof Standard on a Closed DAR Line 1/25/2019

Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL

You Can Do This: Photo Organization and Preservation 1/30/2019

Thomas MacEntee

Six Feet Under Down Under - Cemetery records in Australia 2/5/2019

Jill Ball

Applying Evidence to Genealogical Research Questions 2/19/2019

Melissa Johnson, CG

Polled! Finding your Ancestors in New South Wales Colonial Muster and Census Returns 3/5/2019

Carol Baxter

The Five-story Fall: Correlating Indirect and Direct Evidence to Extend the Pedigree 3/19/2019

Debra S. Mieszala, CG

One Touch Genealogy Research: How to Handle a Record Just Once 4/2/2019

Thomas MacEntee

Transcribing Documents: There is More Than Meets the Eye! 4/16/2019

LaBrenda Garrett-Nelson, JD, LLM, CG

English Parish Records: More than Hatch, Match and Dispatch 4/30/2019

Helen Smith

Valid and Unsound Assumptions: What Was She Thinking? 5/21/2019

Jeanne Bloom, CG

They really didn't swim! Finding your ancestors in New South Wales Colonial Shipping Records 6/4/2019

Carol Baxter

Using Another Library Source: the Government Document Section 6/18/2019

Patricia Stamm, CG, CGL

Remedies for Copy & Paste Genealogy 7/2/2019

Cyndi Ingle

Lesser Used Records for Research in the Netherlands 7/16/2019

Yvette Hoitink, CG

Finding Families in New Zealand 8/6/2019

Fiona Brooker

Ten Tools for Genealogical Writing 8/20/2019

Harold Henderson, CG

Are you Lost? Using Maps, Gazetteers and Directories for British Isles Research 9/3/2019

Paul Milner

Civil Law Concepts and Genealogy 9/17/2019

Claire Bettag, CG

The Stories Behind the Segments 10/1/2019

Blaine Bettinger, Ph.D., J.D.

Civil Law Records in Genealogical Research: Notarial Records 10/15/2019

Claire Bettag, CG

Trove: An Australian and Beyond Genealogical Treasure 11/5/2019

Helen Smith

Native American Research: Things You May Not Know 11/19/2019

Paula Stuart-Warren, CG, FMGS, FUGA

Buried Treasures: What's in the English Parish Chest 12/3/2019

Paul Milner

Marriages Here, There, and Nowhere: Finding Gretna Greens and Borders 12/17/2019

J. Mark Lowe, CG, FUGA

Print the 2019 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


Tuesday's Tip - FamilySearch Filters (Intermediate)

FamilySearch Filters

Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

FamilySearch Filters (Intermediate)

On the FamilySearch interface screen there are two ways to filter the list of ancestors/relatives that you see. The first filter governs what you see related to FamilySearch itself. This is the drop down box you see at the top left. My favorite filter here is the Possible Duplicates.  Notice that whenever you use a filter the number of people will be updated as well as your percentage of completion. 

FamilySearch filter

The second filter governs filtering the people in your file. Click the Edit button. You have five different filters at the top and then at the bottom you can either suppress living people or include them but indicate that they are living. If you choose that option they will have a little red heart next to their name. I love this filtering because I like to work on specific groups of people. You can use this filtering in conjunction with the drop down list filtering. 

Ss6

Using the two different filtering options will help you stay focused and not overwhelmed with the number of people in your file when using FamilySearch's FamilyTree.

 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips check out the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis, CG® is part of the Legacy Family Tree team at MyHeritage. She handles the enhancement suggestions that come in from our users as well as writing for Legacy News. You can usually find her hanging out on the Legacy User Group Facebook page answering questions and posting tips.


FamilyTreeWebinars.com's 2019 Members-only Webinars Announced

MemberFriday

MyHeritage and FamilyTreeWebinars.com are pleased to announce the release of the schedule for its 2019 members-only webinar series. In addition to the free, live webinars broadcast each week and available to the general public (and announced here), Legacy releases a bonus webinar every Friday for its annual/monthly webinar subscribers. This member series provides unique genealogy classes that enrich the overall subject matter of the Legacy Family Tree Webinars educational library. Only subscribers have access to the Member Webinar series.

In 2019, choose from 59 exclusive members-only classes from genealogy's leading educators on topics ranging from the Underground Railroad to Italian Research, from publishing eBooks to planning a trip to Ireland or Salt Lake City, from German newspaper research to land platting. There's something for everyone. No need to pre-register for these bonus classes - they will appear in the "Webinar Library - New!" section of www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com each Friday.

FamilyTreeWebinars.com memberships

With a webinar subscription you get these additional benefits:

  • Access to 1) all the existing 841 classes in the library (1,088 hours of quality genealogy education), 2) plus the 73 live webinars that will be added during the 2019 season, 3) plus the additional 59 bonus subscribers-only webinars - all available for the duration of your membership
  • Access to all 3,614 pages of instructors' handouts plus the new handouts of the 2019 season
  • Chat logs from the live webinars
  • Additional 5% off anything at FamilyTreeWebinars.com
  • Chance for a bonus subscribers-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Additional members-only BONUS webinars
  • Playlist, resume watching, and jump-to features

It's just $49.95/year.

Subscribe

Nowhere else - on land, at sea, or online - will you find genealogy courses as comprehensive, diverse, or as numerous as you will find at FamilyTreeWebinars.com.

2019 Schedule

January

  • Focused Research VS Information Overload by DearMYRTLE / Russ Worthington. 1/4
  • A Nose for News: 20+ Tips for Getting the Most Out of Newspapers by Mary Kircher Roddy. 1/11
  • Three DNA Tests = Three Times the Fun by Diahan Southard. 1/18
  • Get set, GO! Planning and Executing a Successful Research Trip by Nicka Smith. 1/25

February

  • Massachusetts Vital Records by Marian Pierre-Louis. 2/1
  • 1) Crossing the 38th Parallel: Researching Your Korean War Ancestors and 2) Modern Military: Researching Your Vietnam War Ancestors by Michael Strauss. 2/8
  • Preparing for your Trip to the Family History Library by Jim Beidler. 2/15
  • Online Resources for French Genealogy part II by Paul Woodbury. 2/22

March

  • Online Resources for French Genealogy part III by Paul Woodbury. 3/1
  • 1) A Recipe for Well-being: Health and Illness in Colonial New England and 2) Impact of the 1918 flu epidemic: A personal stories-based approach by Lori Lyn Price. 3/8
  • Planning Your Irish Research Trip by David Ryan. 3/15
  • Rescuing Orphaned Items: How to Save and Share Ebay, Etsy and Flea Market Finds by Thomas MacEntee. 3/22
  • US Genealogy for Australians by Thomas MacEntee. 3/29

April

  • Formatting Your Family History eBook for ePub and PDF by Lisa Alzo. 4/5
  • So, You've Found Your German Town of Origin, Now What? by Teresa McMillan. 4/12
  • Organizing (or Reorganizing!) That Family Reunion by Jim Beidler. 4/19
  • 1) Making Sense of the English Census ; 2) Finding Your 17th Century Ancestors in England; 3) England’s Quarter Sessions Records by Paul Milner. 4/26

May

  • 50 Websites for Finding Maps by Gena Philibert-Ortega. 5/3
  • Researching Your Orphaned Ancestors by Debra Renard. 5/10
  • Formatting Your Family History eBook for Print by Lisa Alzo. 5/17
  • Abstract versus Original, Do I need both? by Kelvin Meyers. 5/24
  • Misbegotten Children; Tracing the Family Lines of the Illegitimate by Peggy Lauritzen. 5/31

June 

  • "Deemed a Runaway" - Black Laws of the North by Judy Russell. 6/7
  • Sharecropping Contracts, Chattel Mortgages and Trust Deeds: Discovering Your Hard Working Family Without Land by Mark Lowe. 6/14
  • Formatting Your Family History eBook for Kindle by Lisa Alzo. 6/21
  • Over the Top: Researching Your Canadian Ancestors in World War I by Michael Strauss. 6/28

July

  • Tracing a World War One Soldier from US to Europe and Back Again by Craig Scott. 7/5
  • One Dozen DIY Photo Projects to Share Family Stories by Denise Levenick. 7/12
  • Using DNA for Adoption & Unknown Parentage Work by Mary Eberle. 7/19
  • Finding Your Arkansas Ancestors by Arkansas Gen Society. 7/26 

August

  • Get With the Times: German Newspaper Research by Teresa McMillan. 8/2
  • A Path to Distant Lands: America's Ethnic Settlements by Sharon Monson. 8/9
  • Basics of Land Platting - Part 2 by Mark Lowe. 8/16
  • Working a Probate Case as a Forensic Genealogist by Kelvin Meyers. 8/23
  • The Show Me State: Research in Missouri by Luana Darby. 8/30

September

  • City Directories: No Town Too Small, No Clue Too Little by Thomas MacEntee. 9/6
  • How the Industrial Revolution changed the World by Kirsty Gray. 9/13
  • Italian Civil Registration (Stato Civile): Going Beyond the Basics by Melanie Holtz. 9/20
  • Research in the Equality State: Wyoming Research Tips by Cari Taplin. 9/27

October 

  • Before Statehood: Virginia, Fincastle and Kentucky Records by Mark Lowe. 10/4
  • The Anatomy of BMD: What You Don’t Know About Vital Records by Gena Philibert-Ortega. 10/11
  • Long Distance Italian Genealogy Research by Shellee Morehead. 10/18
  • Decoding Secret Societies: Finding Your Male Fraternal Ancestors by Michael Strauss. 10/25

November

  • Famous DNA: Looking into the genetic history of Joseph Smith Jr., founder of Mormonism by Ugo Perego. 11/1
  • 1) The (Underground) Railroad Runs Through Here and 2) Researching Black Loyalist Communities in Canada by Janice Lovelace. 11/8
  • Online German Church Registers, Duplicates and Substitutes by Jim Beidler. 11/15
  • The Fromelles Genealogy Project: From WW1 Mass Grave to 21st Century Named Grave by Michelle Leonard. 11/22
  • 1) Quaker Migration in North America Prior to the American Revolution and 2) Quaker Migration after the Revolutionary War by Craig Scott. 11/29

December

  • Dark as a Dungeon; Researching Mining Records by Peggy Lauritzen. 12/6
  • 1) Birth, Marriage and Death Records in The National Archives in England and 2) Digitising the records of The National Archives by Audrey Collins. 12/13
  • Virginia Road Orders: an Untapped Source for Genealogical Research by Craig Scott. 12/20
  • Treasures and Hidden Secrets of the Illinois Regional Archives – IRAD by Luana Darby.  12/27

Register for Webinar Wednesday: Maintaining an Organized Computer by Cyndi Ingle

Register
 
Files here, programs there, lost bits and bytes everywhere. Are you tired of searching your computer fruitlessly? Frustrated when you can't find the notes you created in your word processor? Learn how to set up a foolproof filing system and an electronic workbook to correspond with your offline research.
 
Join us and Cyndi Ingle for the live webinar Wednesday, January 9, 2019 at 8pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion. 

Registerbut 

Or register for multiple webinars at once by clicking here.

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Login to view your registration status for this webinar (available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers).

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Can't make it to the live event?

No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

CyndiIngle-144x144Cyndi is the creator, owner and "webmaster" of the award-winning web site Cyndi's List of Genealogy Sites on the Internet, www.CyndisList.com, a categorized index to more than 335,000 online resources. In its first three years, Cyndi's List was three times voted the best genealogy site on the World Wide Web. It helps millions of visitors worldwide each month and has been featured in the media and diverse publications, including ABC News, NBC News, USA Today, Time, Newsweek, Parade Magazine, Wired, Family Tree Magazine, Family Chronicle, and Internet Genealogy magazines. Cyndi has been interviewed for many television and radio broadcasts including ABC News, NBC News, the BBC, and National Public Radio. She has also participated in the Ancestors II television series on PBS. Cyndi, a genealogist for more than 35 years, is a past-member of the board of directors for the National Genealogical Society. Cyndi is an internationally known guest lecturer for various genealogical society meetings and seminars (http://www.CyndisList.com/speaking-calendar/). She has lectured for the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy, GENTECH, Brigham Young University, the Federation of Genealogical Societies, the National Genealogical Society, the Washington Library Association, the Florida Library Association, the American Library Association and numerous local genealogical societies in the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom. Cyndi has authored numerous articles and three books. Before her life on the Internet, Cyndi worked as an international banker specializing in foreign exchange and computer networks. Cyndi, her son, Evan, and three Boston Terriers live in Edgewood, Washington.

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The webinar will be live on Wednesday, January 9, 2019 at:

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We look forward to seeing you all there!


Preservation vs Conservation: What's The Difference?

Preservation vs Conservation: What's The Difference?

The two words, "Preservation" and "Conservation" can be confusing. Many people use them interchangeably but truthfully they are not the same.

Let's Talk About It!

First, let's look at some definitions:

Preservation: n. ~ 1. The professional discipline of protecting materials by minimizing chemical and physical deterioration and damage to minimize the loss of information and to extend the life of cultural property. - 2. The act of keeping from harm, injury, decay, or destruction, especially through noninvasive treatment. - 3. Law · The obligation to protect records and other materials potentially relevant to litigation and subject to discovery.

Conservation: n. ~ 1. The repair or stabilization of materials through chemical or physical treatment to ensure that they survive in their original form as long as possible. - 2. The profession devoted to the preservation of cultural property for the future through examination, documentation, treatment, and preventive care, supported by research and education.

(Source: Society of American Archivists Glossary Terms http://www2.archivists.org/glossary/terms)

My easy definition and explanation that I like to give to genealogists for these two terms is:

"To preserve something is to protect it, to conserve something is to fix it".

Many genealogists have made commitments to organizing their genealogical records in 2019. This could mean filing piles of paper, putting photos in archival sleeves and putting everything in an archival box or filing cabinet. This is preservation at its best! You are "keeping from harm, injury, decay, or destruction" all those wonderful genealogical records that you have in your care. Preserving those records, photographs, memorabilia and family heirlooms for future generations should be part of every genealogist’s commitment to family history. I always encourage genealogists to actively play a part in preserving the family records in their care. It is also important to educate ourselves on the best practices for records preservation. Knowing how to take care of our precious family records will hopefully ensure that they will survive for generations to come.

Knowing what materials to purchase and how to store our records can make a lasting impact on the survival of these records. Obtaining archival materials such as acid free sleeves, archival boxes and archival tissue paper, just to name a few, can mean the difference in the preservation or destruction of our records. I highly recommend purchasing archival materials from reputable archival stores (see list below). It is important to purchase materials that are acid free, lignin free and that have passed the P.A.T. All three of these should be listed on the packaging or in the description of the product. “P.A.T.” is an acronym that stands for Photographic Activity Test. This is a standard procedure to check for potential chemical reactions between materials used to make enclosures and photographs stored in those enclosures. Any archival materials that lists all three of these standards or at least two of the three is an excellent choice to use for your family records.

Now, let's say you have a photograph that is damaged and you want to "repair or stabilize it...to its original form", then you would need to conserve this photograph. Completing conservation work on your own is not recommended.  Most likely, you will want to seek out a professional conservator that specializes in repairing and fixing photographs. Many genealogists don't feel comfortable doing these types of repairs and if you don't have the knowledge of the materials and methods of conservation, then you need to leave it to the professionals. This is also true when it comes to conservation of paper records. You do not want to cause more damage by doing it yourself. Archivists also seek out professional conservators to help with conservation challenges at their facilities. I have had several items at the Houston County, Tennessee Archives sent out to a conservator for repairs with fantastic results. Knowing our limitations and seeking professional conservation help is the best decision when trying to repair a document or photograph.

Where to find a conservator?

I suggest contacting the state archive in the state where you live. In the United States, all 50 states have a state archives. Most of them have a professional conservator on staff that works with the records in their facility. Some of these conservators will also take on projects from the public. If they do not accept projects from the public, they should be able to give you a reference name and contact information for one they recommend.  There could be different conservators for different mediums such as one for only photographs, one for only documents, etc.

I would also suggest going to the website:

American Institute for Conservation (http://www.conservation-us.org/). They have a section entitled "Find a Conservator" where you can locate someone in your area to help with your conservation problem. You can search for a conservator by “Geographic Location” by entering your postal code and choosing a specific mile radius to search. The site will give you names of conservators in your area that can be of help. There is also an option to choose what type of medium you need help with such as books and paper, textiles, electronic media, etc. There is also a search feature where you can locate a conservator by a specific name. If you know the name of a conservator or were given a name by the state archives, you can search for them. There is even an option to locate a conservator that is willing to travel to where you are to perform the necessary conservation work.

Now you know the different between Preservation and Conservation. I encourage all genealogists to actively preserve your genealogy research, documents, photographs and family heirlooms.

Archival Stores

Gaylord Archival

http://www.gaylord.com/

Hollinger Metal Edge

https://www.hollingermetaledge.com/

University Products

https://www.universityproducts.com/

Light Impressions

http://www.lightimpressionsdirect.com/

Brodart

http://www.brodart.com/

Archival Methods

https://www.archivalmethods.com/

Print File Archival Storage

https://www.printfile.com/index.aspx

To learn more about archives and genealogy visit the Archives section of the Legacy Family Tree Webinars site.

Melissa Barker, The Archive Lady, is a Certified Archives Manager currently working as the Houston County, Tennessee Archivist. She is also a professional genealogist and lectures, teaches and writes about the genealogy research process, researching in archives and records preservation. She has been researching her own family history for the past 28 years.


New "Member Friday" Webinar - Focused Research VS Information Overload by DearMYRTLE and Cousin Russ

New "Member Friday" Webinar - Focused Research VS Information Overload by DearMyrtle and Cousin Russ

Every Friday we're pleased to offer Legacy Family Tree Webinar subscribers a new bonus webinar just for them!   This Friday enjoy "Focused Research VS Information Overload" by DearMYRTLE and Cousin Russ. If you're not a member, remember the webinar previews are always free.

Focused Research VS Information Overload

Overwhelmed by 3.45 million results of a Google Search? This webinar explains three proven methods for balancing 'staying on task' with serendipitous findings. No more falling down rabbit holes following those bright shiny objects.

New "Member Friday" Webinar - Focused Research VS Information Overload by DearMYRTLE and Cousin Russ


_WatchVideo

_WatchPreview 

About the Presenters

DearMyrtleDearMYRTLE is the nom de plume of Pat Richley-Erickson, author of the award-winning DearMYRTLE Genealogy Blog, consistently among the top 5 family history blogs internationally, where the focus is beginning genealogy topics. DearMYRTLE hosts several weekly hangouts including Mondays with Myrt, Wacky Wednesday, and moderates more intense study groups including Beginning Genealogy, Mastering Genealogical Proof, The Written Conclusion, and Genealogy and the Law. Online since 1985 in membership development with Q-Link's Your Family Tree and later on the leadership team of AOL's Golden Gate Genealogy Forum, Pat is a retired post-secondary computer instructor. She and her husband live in Salt Lake City, Utah, just a stone's throw from the Family History Library. A speaker at regional and national conferences including several livestreamed videocasts at RootsTech 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2017. Ol' Myrt and her team presented two G+ Hangout on Air workshops at RootsTech. She has served RootsTech as an official blogger and ambassador (2011-2017). DearMYRTLE is a co-founder of the Genea-Quilters group on Facebook, and founder of www.GeneaWebinars.com, a centralized calendar and blog for all known genealogy webinar hosts and virtual presenters. She serves as admin for The Organized Genealogist Facebook Group together with her hangout co-host, her real-life Cousin Russ Worthington. Find out more at www.DearMYRTLE.com. (Yup! She’s a dot com!)
 
Russ WorthingtonRuss Worthington lives in the beautiful Northwest corner of New Jersey that most people don't know exists in his beautiful state (no exit numbers). He started "collecting his ancestors" about 15 years ago when his youngest daughter gave him a genealogy management software program as a gift to "give him something to do." Little did he know where this would lead him and the people he would meet. Russ enjoys helping others in their hunts and in building their family relationships.
 

See all the webinars by DearMYRTLE and Russ Worthington in the Legacy library.

 
Not a member yet?

Legacy Family Tree Webinars provides genealogy education where-you-are through live and recorded online webinars and videos. Learn from the best instructors in genealogy including Thomas MacEntee, Judy Russell, J. Mark Lowe, Lisa Louise Cooke, Megan Smolenyak, Tom Jones, and many more. Learn at your convenience. On-demand classes are available 24 hours a day! All you need is a computer or mobile device with an Internet connection.

Subscribe today and get access to this BONUS members-only webinar AND all of this:

  • All 841 classes in the library (1088 hours of quality genealogy education)
  • 3614 pages of instructors' handouts
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  • Additional 5% off anything at FamilyTreeWebinars.com
  • Chance for a bonus subscribers-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Additional members-only webinars

It's just $49.95/year or $9.95/month.

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Look at our lineup of speakers for 2019! All live webinars are free to watch.

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Learning Family History With The 1918 Pandemic Trail Game

Please Note: Sometimes we have bad luck. Shortly after the publication of this article the CDC pulled this game from their website. It is regrettably no longer available.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

If you grew up in the 1990s or later or had a child or grandchild during this time you may be familiar with the educational video game, The Oregon Trail. In this game you follow the Oregon Trail and experience what pioneers faced in their quest to go west. You begin in  Independence, Missouri and travel the trail while facing various obstacles along the way including hunger, accidents, wagon failures, and death.[1] Anyone who has played is familiar with certain phrases uttered in the game such as  “you have died of dysentery,” one of the fates that can befall a player.

Pandemic start

The Center for Disease Control (CDC) has taken a cue from the popular 1980s game and designed their own game that tells the story of the 1918 Influenza Pandemic. Simply called,  The 1918 Pandemic Trail Game, players take a walk through the streets of Philadelphia in September 1918 as the flu has broken out infecting and even killing soldiers at nearby Fort Dix.

Why does the game focus on Philadelphia? Philadelphia was especially hard hit by the flu due to an influx of soldiers and sailors, overcrowding, and a lack of medical personnel. On top of that, crowds watching the Liberty Loan parade ensured that the flu spread rapidly and devastated the city of two million. Philadelphia would see half a million cases of the flu and 16,000 deaths. 12,000 of these deaths were over a 5 week period. [2]

Pandemic PA

Pancdemic characters

As you begin the 1918 Pandemic Trail Game, you choose to play as one of three characters, a letter carrier, a farmer, or a soldier and your mission is to go about your character's day-to-day life making choices that may put you at risk for the flu.

Pandemic mission

Just like The Oregon Trail, initially this game seems like it should be easy. After all, you just have to get through a few scenarios without your character catching the flu.  But there are hazards that are far removed from our modern everyday lives. I played the game as a letter carrier thinking that although my character would be out in public I could avoid contact infected community members. But, of course I was wrong. One obstacle was that unlike today, mailboxes were not mandatory in 1918 which meant my character was forced many times to interact with coughing community members.

I played other scenarios with one of my sons including the soldier character who experiences everything from digging graves for those lost to the flu to going to the parade. Avoiding groups was one sure way to stay safe from the flu.

Pandemic mail facts

Pandmic wave

Not surprising to me, because I didn’t avoid that coughing family on my mail route, I contracted the flu (and perhaps died since there is the RIP on the tombstone next to the news of my infection). Let’s just say I’m very grateful for the availability of the flu shot in today's world since I have had the flu before and it wasn’t a lot of fun. Today we take for granted vaccines and preventative measures, but our ancestors weren’t so lucky. The 1918 flu pandemic was frightening because it did the opposite of who the flu typically affects - younger, healthier people. Otherwise healthy people contracted and died of the flu. 

Pandemic RIP

 

Besides the graphics, this game is definitely old school. It doesn’t currently work on mobile devices and you use your computer’s space bar and enter key to move forward in the game. But technology aside, the history and the information incorporated in this game provides an important message about how the flu affected our ancestors and how we can avoid it today.

So why should family historians care about this game? This is one way you can help tell the story of how the pandemic affected your ancestors. Consider learning more about your ancestor in the year 1918 and then write about it. Use documents and images to help illustrate the facts. Invite family members to play this CDC game and then tell them how this same flu affected your family. It’s a great way to introduce this time period to your family and will make the story of their ancestors even more poignant and interesting.

You can learn more about the 1918 flu pandemic  from the CDC's 1918 Commemoration web page including  a history, a timeline, and stories about those working on understanding the 1918 pandemic better.

Pandemic stats

 

[1] “The Oregon Trail  (1985 video game),” Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Oregon_Trail_(1985_video_game): accessed 20 December 2018).

[2] "Influenza (“Spanish Flu” Pandemic, 1918-19)," The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia (https://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/archive/influenza-spanish-flu-pandemic-1918-19/: accessed 20 December 2018). 

 

Gena Philibert-Ortega is an author, instructor, and researcher. She blogs at Gena's Genealogy and Food.Family.Ephemera. You can find her presentations on the Legacy Family Tree Webinars website.

 


DNA Rights and Wrongs: The Ethical Side of Testing - free webinar by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL now online for limited time

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The recording of today's webinar, "DNA Rights and Wrongs: The Ethical Side of Testing” by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL is now available to view at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com for free for a limited time.

Webinar Description

Whose permission is needed to test a child or an adult unable to consent? Who owns our DNA? What can we disclose about a cousin who has tested? The rules of the road for the ethical challenges facing genealogists interested in using DNA evidence as part of their family history research. Learn the ethical rules that can guide us through many if not most of the situations in which we as genetic genealogists find ourselves.
 
View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 22 minute recording of "DNA Rights and Wrongs: The Ethical Side of Testing" is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 840 classes, 1,086 hours of genealogy education)
  • On-demand access to the instructor handouts (now 3,608 pages)
  • On-demand access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Chance for a members-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
  • Ability to view which webinars you are registered for
  • Use of the playlist, resume watching, and jump-to features

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year
  • Monthly membership: $9.95/month

Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

Maintaining an Organized Computer 1/9/2019

Cyndi Ingle

Visualizing Information for Genealogists 1/15/2019

Margaret R. Fortier, CG

What Would You Do If You Had Five Days in Washington DC? 1/16/2019

Pamela Boyer Sayre, CG, CGL

Using OneNote with your Genealogy 1/23/2019

Tessa Keough

Patriot or Not?: Using the Genealogical Proof Standard on a Closed DAR Line 1/25/2019

Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL

You Can Do This: Photo Organization and Preservation 1/30/2019

Thomas MacEntee

Six Feet Under Down Under - Cemetery records in Australia 2/5/2019

Jill Ball

Applying Evidence to Genealogical Research Questions 2/19/2019

Melissa Johnson, CG

Polled! Finding your Ancestors in New South Wales Colonial Muster and Census Returns 3/5/2019

Carol Baxter

The Five-story Fall: Correlating Indirect and Direct Evidence to Extend the Pedigree 3/19/2019

Debra S. Mieszala, CG

One Touch Genealogy Research: How to Handle a Record Just Once 4/2/2019

Thomas MacEntee

Transcribing Documents: There is More Than Meets the Eye! 4/16/2019

LaBrenda Garrett-Nelson, JD, LLM, CG

English Parish Records: More than Hatch, Match and Dispatch 4/30/2019

Helen Smith

Valid and Unsound Assumptions: What Was She Thinking? 5/21/2019

Jeanne Bloom, CG

They really didn't swim! Finding your ancestors in New South Wales Colonial Shipping Records 6/4/2019

Carol Baxter

Using Another Library Source: the Government Document Section 6/18/2019

Patricia Stamm, CG, CGL

Remedies for Copy & Paste Genealogy 7/2/2019

Cyndi Ingle

Lesser Used Records for Research in the Netherlands 7/16/2019

Yvette Hoitink, CG

Finding Families in New Zealand 8/6/2019

Fiona Brooker

Ten Tools for Genealogical Writing 8/20/2019

Harold Henderson, CG

Are you Lost? Using Maps, Gazetteers and Directories for British Isles Research 9/3/2019

Paul Milner

Civil Law Concepts and Genealogy 9/17/2019

Claire Bettag, CG

The Stories Behind the Segments 10/1/2019

Blaine Bettinger, Ph.D., J.D.

Civil Law Records in Genealogical Research: Notarial Records 10/15/2019

Claire Bettag, CG

Trove: An Australian and Beyond Genealogical Treasure 11/5/2019

Helen Smith

Native American Research: Things You May Not Know 11/19/2019

Paula Stuart-Warren, CG, FMGS, FUGA

Buried Treasures: What's in the English Parish Chest 12/3/2019

Paul Milner

Marriages Here, There, and Nowhere: Finding Gretna Greens and Borders 12/17/2019

J. Mark Lowe, CG, FUGA

Print the 2019 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


The Top 10 Genealogy Webinars of 2018

What a year it was for our webinar series! At the beginning of the year we promised to bring you 106 genealogy webinars. We miscalculated. We brought you 200 of them. 200 new ways to find your family history at FamilyTreeWebinars.com. We compiled the top 10 most-watched webinar recordings for you below.

Top 10 Overall

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#1

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Is your favorite among the top 10 in 2018?


This Month's Top 10 Genealogy Webinars

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We've tallied the numbers and made a list of the Top 10 FamilyTreeWebinars.com classes for December 2018! Are your favorite topics or instructors among the list? Need something new to learn? Use the list to get inspired!

Each month thousands of Legacy Family Tree Webinar subscribers head for the library to learn new skills and techniques to help improve their genealogy research. Among the now-839 genealogy classes in the members-only library, these were the most frequently played during the month of December 2018.  They aren't necessarily the newest classes but rather the topics that were sought out by our members.

Have you seen any of these classes? Are these among your favorites too? Some of these classes (and topics) might be new to you! Get inspired to learn more and make your genealogy journey more fun!

The Top 10 for December 2018

1. MyHeritage LIVE 2018 Opening Session: A love affair with genealogy PLUS Industry-changing announcements by Gilad Japhet

2. Turning MyHeritage Clues Into Genealogy To Do's by Thomas MacEntee

3. 101 Ways to Design a Genealogy Chart by Janet Hovorka

4. How I Use MyHeritage by Vidar Øverlie

5. Legacy 9 Unlocked (part 9): Adding an Entry from an Online Database by Geoff Rasmussen

6. Citation for Beginners by Shellee Morehead, PhD, CG

7. Legacy 9 Unlocked (part 8): The Smoking Gun by Geoff Rasmussen

8. Ins and Outs of Indexes: Keys to Unlocking County and State Records by Mary Kircher Roddy

9. Researching with MyHeritage SuperSearch by Daniel Horowitz and Tal Erlichman

10. That's New to Me: Unfamiliar Websites for Your Genealogy by Gena Philibert-Ortega

The Runner-Ups

11. How to Find Your Family in Newspapers with MyHeritage SuperSearch by Lisa Louise Cooke

12. A Guide to Scandinavian Records on MyHeritage by Mike Mansfield

13. Two Ways to Approach Your MyHeritage DNA Match List by Diahan Southard

14. MyHeritage DNA 101 by Ran Snir

15. Proving Identity and Kinship Using the GPS: Finding a Freedman's Family by Nancy A. Peters, CG, CGL

16. An Introduction to Geni by Mike Stangel

17. Railroad Records and Railroad History: Methods for Tracking by Paula Stuart-Warren, CG, FMGS, FUGA

18. MyHeritage DNA: Advanced Features by Ran Snir

19. Genealogy 101, a 3-Session Course in Beginning Genealogy - Part 1 by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen, AG

20. Using MyHeritage's Unique Technologies & Learning Online with FamilyTreeWebinars.com by Geoff Rasmussen

Access to classes in the Legacy Family Tree Webinar library are available with an annual or monthly membership. Not a member? Become one! Or watch one of our free classes here.