Tuesday's Tip - Using Trees

  TT - Using Trees

Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

Using Trees

Adding unlinked individuals to your file is a great way to capture people that you "think" are related but you aren't quite sure. You can add them as an unlinked individual and then you treat them just like anyone else in your file. You can add their family members and you will create a separate tree for this family group. If you ever find the connection you can simply link them to the main tree and all of the members of that tree will be linked.

Here is a screenshot of the trees in my One-Name Study. A One-Name Study inherently has a lot of unlinked individuals but with any luck you will find family connections and start linking people. This is actually a small ONS file because Glaentzer is a rare surname. You can see that my ONS file has 229 separate trees all in one file. I can use the scroll bar to see them all or I can print a list. You can also see that I can tag all of the members of a specific tree which is very helpful. I can also tag the "anchors" of each tree. Legacy has so many cool features.

  Trees

 

To reach the Tree Finder screen, choose Trees on the View tab of the Ribbon bar.  The first time this screen is displayed, Legacy builds the list.  When you return to this screen in the future, the same list is shown (for speed reasons).  If you have added new trees or just want to make sure that the list is up-to-date, click the Refresh button.

 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips checkout the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis is part of the technical support team at Millennia, the makers of the Legacy Family Tree software program. With over 20 years of research experience, Michele’s passion is helping new genealogists get started on the right foot through her writings, classes and lectures. She is the former staff genealogist and weekly columnist for the McDuffie Mirror and now authors Ancestoring, a blog geared toward the beginner/intermediate researcher.


Tuesday's Tip - Global Changes

TT - Global Changes


Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

Making Global Changes

If you are going to make any changes to your file that have a global impact you need to make a backup of your file first. The biggie is when you are doing any merging. Legacy will make a temporary backup for you before you start merging and then put a nice little icon on your ribbon so that you can revert back.

You need to turn this on in the Options menu:

Options > Customize > 12. Other Settings

Scroll all the way to the bottom to Option 12.5

Click the button Turn of or off Optional Reminder Messages

Click the Prompts/Reminder Tab

Click the box Prompt to do an automatic backup before merging

When you do that, you will see the temp backup on the toolbar as soon as you start Find Duplicates routine.

Merge

This backup is only good for the current merging session! As soon as you close the merge the icon on the ribbon will disappear. I always make a real backup too in case I change my mind after I close the session.

You need to make a backup before you start working in any of the Master Lists. When you make a change here it affects your entire file and if you accidentally make a mistake a backup with save you a lot of tears.

If you ever use the Advanced Deleting you will want to make a backup first. Once you click the Apply button you can't go back. I highly suggest you keep the box "Confirm Each Deletion" checkmarked. Same with Advanced Sourcing. If you send a source to 462 people you can imagine that it won't be fun to go through there and delete them one at a time if you accidentally made a mistake.

 

 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips checkout the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

 

Michele Simmons Lewis is part of the technical support team at Millennia, the makers of the Legacy Family Tree software program. With over 20 years of research experience, Michele’s passion is helping new genealogists get started on the right foot through her writings, classes and lectures. She is the former staff genealogist and weekly columnist for the McDuffie Mirror and now authors Ancestoring, a blog geared toward the beginner/intermediate researcher.


Tuesday's Tip - Editing Children's Information

TT-EditChildren

Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

Editing Children's Information

You can get to the Edit Children screen by right clicking in the Children's List in the Family View and then selecting Children's Settings OR you can click on the cute little shortcut icon that will take you right to it.

 

TT-EditChildren

 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips checkout the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

 

Michele Simmons Lewis is part of the technical support team at Millennia, the makers of the Legacy Family Tree software program. With over 20 years of research experience, Michele’s passion is helping new genealogists get started on the right foot through her writings, classes and lectures. She is the former staff genealogist and weekly columnist for the McDuffie Mirror and now authors Ancestoring, a blog geared toward the beginner/intermediate researcher.


Webinar Wednesdays (and more) Now Available on your TV with Chromecast

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What's that on my TV? If you said "Webinar Wednesday" you're right!

My brand new Chromecast from Google arrived in today's mail and now I can watch anything in our webinar library from the comfort of my living room recliner on my 55" wide-screen TV without having to connect my laptop to the TV. Talk about genealogy and technology heaven!

ChromecastHere's how it works. 

1. Purchase the Chromecast device. Amazon sells it for $30-35 here.

2. Plug it in to one of the HDMI ports on your television.

3. Plug the included USB power cable into one end of the Chromecast, and the other end into an open USB port on your television.

4. Follow the on-screen instructions to complete the setup.

What you can watch

OK, it's not just webinars from our library you can watch on your TV using Chromecast. You can broadcast anything to your TV from your:

  • Main computer (using the Chrome browser and extension)
  • Laptop (using the Chrome browser)
  • Tablet (using the Google Cast app)
  • Smart phone (using the Google Cast app)

Also look for the Google Cast button in video apps such as Netflix, YouTube, Hulu and more. 

Casting

Once everything's set up (it's really pretty easy) look for the Google Cast button in the upper right of your Chrome browser and click.

Cast1

 

Here's what the button's options look like:

Cast2

 

And here's another options screen (click the small arrow in the upper right). This lets you cast not just a browser's tab, but your entire monitor.

Cast

And here's what my 9-year-old, Braden, looks like as he watches our Genealogy Serendipity webinar from the couch.

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I'm not a big TV watcher, but with this technology, I love that I can catch up on or re-watch webinars in our library on the big screen. I might even do it with a bowl of popcorn tonight.


Tuesday's Tip - Husband and Wife Toolbars

Welcome to the Legacy Tuesday's Tip!

 

TuesdayTip

Tuesday Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn how to use the Legacy Family Tree Software with new tricks and techniques.

Husband and Wife Toolbars

Did you know that you can customize the Husband and Wife Toolbars?

These are the icons you see below the husband and wife details on the Family View (see icons in red boxes below).

To customize the toolbars:

Go to Design > Toolbars > Husb/Wife Toolbars.  If you have trouble finding it, the design link will be on the top right of your screen as in the image.

The default setting includes all available icons. You can customize the feature by deleting icons that you don't use or use less frequently.

  HusbandWifeToolbars

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips checkout the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

 

Michele Simmons Lewis is part of the technical support team at Millennia, the makers of the Legacy Family Tree software program. With over 20 years of research experience, Michele’s passion is helping new genealogists get started on the right foot through her writings, classes and lectures. She is the former staff genealogist and weekly columnist for the McDuffie Mirror and now authors Ancestoring, a blog geared toward the beginner/intermediate researcher. 


Windows 10 and Legacy Family Tree

Windows10

Windows 10 is here and we are pleased to report that Legacy Family Tree software works great!

While I just installed Windows 10 this morning, many of our Legacy users have been testing Legacy with Windows 10 for months now without issue. Both look really good. From all the reviews I've read, like this one here, the new operating system is a good, solid release.

It's also one of our hot topics right now on our new Legacy Facebook Group. Join the conversation or share your experience here.


Reserve Your Free Upgrade to Windows 10

This morning I glanced at the "notification area" (formerly known as system tray) of my Windows 8 desktop and noticed a brand new icon:

Notificationarea

Nervous to click it (I had a dream last night where I clicked on an email and got a virus...) yet excited to see what it was - I clicked.

What a welcome way to begin my week! It was a notification to reserve my free upgrade to Windows 10.

Windows

Clicking on the "Reserve your free upgrade" button, this screen appeared:

Windows2

After clicking the "Send confirmation" button, it stated that I will receive a notification when Windows 10 is ready:

Windows3

Cool!

What's New in Windows 10?

Click here for the list of what's new.

When will Windows 10 be available?

July 29, 2015

Who is eligible for the free upgrade?

Microsoft's website says:

The only requirements are that a) your device is compatible, and b) you're running genuine Windows 7 Service Pack 1 or Windows 8.1. Windows 10 is designed to run on Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 PCs. That means your device is likely compatible and will run Windows 10.

Other Q&A

Click here

Reserve Your Copy of Windows 10 today!

If you do not see the notification in your notification area, click here to reserve your copy of Windows 10 today.

Does Legacy Family Tree work with Windows 10?

Yes, from what I hear it works great!


Spreadsheets 201: Excel-lent Examples - brand new BONUS webinar for subscribers

Spreadsheet

Spreadsheets can help you analyze your genealogy data and keep track of your research. In this webinar, Mary Roddy teaches how to use this powerful tool to gain perspective and further your genealogy research. You’ll learn how to quickly take search results from Familysearch and Ancestry.com and create a spreadsheet for further analysis. You'll also get lots of ideas for using spreadsheets in genealogy such as city directory research, recording census birth places of families, keeping track of spelling variations for your online searching, and learn amazing spreadsheet tips and tricks along the way. Spreadsheets 201 is the brand new companion to Mary's Spreadsheets 101: Excel-lence in Genealogy.

How to view:

If you are an annual or monthly webinar subscriber, this webinar's recording is now available in the Webinar Library. Just head over to the library, login, and enjoy! Fix pages of supplemental syllabus materials also accompany this webinar.

Click here to watch the webinar.

If you are not yet a webinar subscriber...when you join as an annual or monthly subscriber you, too, will have access to these bonus members-only webinars. This is the tenth we've added since January. Take a look at all of these benefits:

  • Unlimited access to the entire Webinar Library (currently 228 classes to choose from)
  • Access to the instructors' handouts (currently 960 pages)
  • Access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • Chance for a bonus subscribers-only door prize during each live webinar
  • 5% off anything in the FamilyTreeWebinars.com store
  • See which live webinars you have registered for

For more information, or to subscribe, click here.

About the presenter

Presenter-6281Mary Roddy, a Certified Public Accountant, has been a genealogist for 13 years, becoming interested in the subject in anticipation of an extended trip to Ireland. She earned a certificate from the Genealogy and Family History program at the University of Washington in 2005. She is an active member of the Seattle Genealogical Society, having served in multiple board positions and on the seminar and education committees and is a regular facilitator on the SGS Brick Wall panel. She lectures frequently on various genealogical topics in the Seattle area. Her articles, “Mark Golden: A Case Study in World War II Research,” and “Sailing in Their Wake,” were published in Family Chronicle Magazine in 2012 and 2013, respectively. Her article, “Five Tips for Online Newspaper Research,” appeared in the June/July 2013 issue of Internet Genealogy. She presented her research on Mark Golden as part of the Southern California Genealogy Jamboree webinar series. She is currently working on a novel set in the San Francisco area in 1900 and 1901, based on stories of several of her ancestors and their associates which she discovered in her genealogical research.

Click here for all of Mary's webinars.


Protect an Overlooked Genealogy Treasure

by Marian Pierre-Louis

  Mail

When it comes to recording, preserving and conservation genealogists have impressive skills. Genealogists will scan or photograph original documents for later review. They will enter their data in a genealogy program - and even cite the sources! They will put family letters into protective sleeves and precious photos into acid free boxes. But there's one area that genealogists often overlook.

When was the last time you saved your email? While all email can be considered important, let's just consider the email related to your family history. This could be correspondence with a distant cousin or sending a request to an archive for a document. It could be a group collaboration on a sticky genealogical puzzle. Or it could be correspondence with a genealogical professional located in your ancestor's home town.

The Problem

Many people feel that saving email in their email program is good enough. That's a dangerous game to play. Email programs were never intended to be database repositories. Many of them even have a size capacity limit. After that limit has been reached the programs can get glitches, crash or stop working.  For instance, when using Outlook 2003 or 2007 the size limit of the file (a .pst file) is 20 GB.  That may seem large but if you are emailing photos or videos you could reach capacity very quickly. The size limit for Outlook 2010 is 50 GB but from what I've read online 5GB is a good practical working limit for any of those programs.

While you may not experience software crashes with Google Mail (Gmail), you will encounter mailbox size limits. Most users have the standard free 15GB limit. Schools and businesses may have 30 GB limits. Items in your spam and trash folders count toward your limit. Beyond that you will either have to delete email to make more room or have to purchase extra space.

Even if your inbox doesn't reach capacity there are other threats to the safety of your email. In my case, my HP laptop overheated (a known issue) and the hard drive crashed not once, but twice. Some of my data was salvaged but much of it was lost.

Over the years I have been negligent about saving my email properly. I did make backup copies but over a 10 year period sometimes even the backup copies get lost.

The Solution

So what is the solution? Save individual emails to another format. Using the "Save As" feature in Outlook, you can save individual emails as html, text (.txt) as well as some Outlook message formats. My recommendation is to save the email in .txt format to your genealogy directories. Txt is the most basic format and most easily read by other programs. It is the least likely to become obsolete due to software version changes.

Outlook-1

Gmail users have a harder time saving their email beyond using copy and paste.  It is now possible to save your Gmail in the .mbox format (see here for instructions). This will save all of your emails to a single file (which is great for backing up!). If you want to save individual emails to your genealogy folders, you'll have to use the cut and paste method.

Another thing you can do (I would do this in addition to saving individual emails to your computer) is to copy and paste emails to the notes area for the relevant ancestor in your genealogy software program.

While some correspondence, as mentioned earlier, is very obvious and should be saved, there are other emails hiding in your inbox that are even more important. These are the emails you exchange with your parents, siblings and extended family.

Sometimes these emails are very short such as "when was Aunt Louise born?" and its corresponding answer. Others are important gems hidden in the midst of day to day chatting. For instance your mother might mention the weather being windy today and then mention that time when the family gathered together during the 1938 hurricane.

These are the emails that I've lost. I've emailed my uncles with quick queries or received unsolicited stories and memories. But my day to day life was too busy to stop what I was doing to save the emails to a different format on my hard drive in an organized manner. One of my uncles has since passed and all my email exchanges with him are lost.

There's no teacher like experience! I now carefully consider each email I receive and quickly save it to the correct family directory. When saving emails be sure to capture the date and to and from fields Hopefully you will have the chance to learn from my experience before you make the same mistake yourself.

Do you have a different way to save your family history related email? Tell us about it!

Marian Pierre-Louis is the Social Media Marketing Manager for Legacy Family Tree. She is also the host of The Genealogy Professional podcast. Check out her webinars in the Legacy library.


How to receive our announcements and discussions on Facebook - even if you already "like" us

Thanks everyone for "liking" our Facebook page. It's been a fun place to interact, announce our new updates, and share the latest happenings here at Legacy Family Tree.

Unfortunately, lots of you who have liked the page do not receive its announcements or discussions in your Facebook feed. But it doesn't take much on your part to change that. Take a look at the brief video below to see what you can do. By the way - this isn't specific just to our Facebook page. The recommendations in the video will help you for any page you wish to follow.